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Technology Plan for Your Small Business in Nine Easy Steps

Technology Plan for Your Small Business in Nine Easy Steps

As businesses come to rely more on technology, there is an urgent need to plan for it. However, technology planning is hardly ever on the “to do” list of a small business; this is because many entrepreneurs are not aware of the importance of a technology plan or consider the process tedious and time-consuming. However, this does not have to be the case, and in this article we share vital information to help you develop and implement an effective technology plan for your small business.

Technology planning is not just about deciding on the right time to change out computers and update software. It involves the strategic process of determining how your business can utilize technology to enhance its objectives and productivity.

1- Assessing the Technology Resources of Your Business

Before you start the planning process, it is important to evaluate your existing technology resources. You will need to complete an assessment that covers all aspects of innovation in your business. This will include not just listing your physical equipment and software, but will also involve identifying what works and whether the resources in your business meet the current standards for your industry and efficiency.

2- Management

Management is paramount in technology planning for a small business. Strong leadership will motivate the use of technology to further the business mission, contribute to staff’s willingness to use new equipment and software, help with credibility with investors, and minimize any reluctance on the part of technophobes. Ideally, the owner of the business provides strong leadership, but it can likewise come from supervisors and other managers.

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3-  Planning Team

Whenever possible, technology planning ought to be a team activity. The team should:

  • evaluate existing technology
  • recognize innovation requirements and concerns
  • prepare a technology vision statement
  • develop a budget and timeline
  • write the technology plan
  • keep track of the project’s implementation
  • Guarantee stakeholder buy-in.

Ideally, the team should consist of the owner or the chief executive officer (CEO), a project manager, administrative assistant, accountant, and system administrator or tech specialist. Not every small business will have enough human resources for such an elaborate team. Nevertheless, it is important to have some representation from the major operational departments of the company to make up the planning group.

4- Identify and Prioritize Technology Requirements

After you have examined the existing state of your technology resources, the next step for your planning team in the preparation process is to recognize your company’s future innovation needs and to prioritize them. Every organization will have its requirements but should include:

  • Purchasing new software and updates
  • Software customization
  • Personnel training
  • Replacing and upgrading equipment
  • Computer networking
  • Developing an Internet presence
  • Improving online marketing
  • Designing or revamping the business website
  • Developing policies for the use of computers and other technology devices
  • Implementing backup systems and security procedures
  • Replacing outdated hardware
  • Employing appropriate technology personnel

Quite naturally as you brainstorm your technology needs, you will generate a list longer than the reach of your budget. Accordingly, the next task in your technology planning is to prioritize. As a small business owner you will need to be realistic about what you can achieve and set reasonable timelines.

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5- Vision Statement   

Following prioritizing, it is time to prepare a vision statement for your technology plan. Start by evaluating your company’s mission statement. Key considerations in this process should include how technology will help your business meet its mission and enhance organizational effectiveness.

6- Budgeting

The next step is establishing a budget. This can be a challenge for a small business but is critical in creating a technology plan. Thorough research is essential to ascertain the real cost for the implementation of the technology priorities of the business. It is common for a business owner to leave out expenses such as the loss of working hours for staff training, monthly updates to software, and other operational costs that are in additional to the acquisition price.

7- Implementation

Another important step in your technology plan is to establish a timeline for implementation. Preferably you’ll be working on a strategy that can be carried out over a period and the team should consider the following:

  • What are the very first things you will need to do?
  • How long do you approximate it will take to finish each?
  • Once the business completes the plans, what are the next steps?

Timelines ought to be versatile to accommodate unanticipated events, but rigid enough to maintain momentum. You will want to present your timeline in phases allowing time for identifying financing for each activity.

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8- Writing the Plan

You have evaluated your existing resources, determined and prioritized your requirements, prepared your technology vision, developed a budget and produced a timeline for execution. The next step in technology planning is writing the plan. Most of the preparation work and brainstorming by the team will make this step much easier.

The written plan must consist of a minimum of these four key elements:

  • A technology vision statement
  • A description of the strategy
  • A timeline
  • A budget plan

More detailed plans may consist of:

  • An organizational profile
  • A mission statement
  • Inventory of existing innovation
  • A breakdown of details associated with the implementation
  • An analysis of long and short-term objectives

Many small business owners will do the necessary preparation work, host many meetings to discuss a technology plan, but never actually prepare a document. Having a written technology plan will provide a reference point for the business owner and the staff in general.

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9- Financing for Technology

With luck, the efforts included in the preparation of the technology plan will also help with funding. That’s why it’s so essential for your vision statement to describe how technology will help your organization satisfy its objective.

While there are entities that offer grants for technology to small businesses, they are often overwhelmed with requests. Therefore, it is important to approach funders and donors who are already supporting your mission and to use your plan to demonstrate your goals.

There is no doubt that technology is essential to any small business and growth is hinged on how the company can acquire and utilize technology effectively. The above information is a great start in moving towards the development of a technology plan in your business if you do not already have one.

Featured photo credit: Pexels.com via static.pexels.com

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Last Updated on August 16, 2018

16 Productivity Secrets of Highly Successful People Revealed

16 Productivity Secrets of Highly Successful People Revealed

The same old motivational secrets don’t really motivate you after you’ve read them for the tenth time, do they?

How about a unique spin on things?

These 16 productivity secrets of successful people will make you reevaluate your approach to your home, work, and creative lives. Learn from these highly successful people, turn these little things they do into your daily habits and you’ll get closer to success.

1. Empty your mind.

It sounds counterproductive, doesn’t it?

Emptying your mind when you have so much to remember seems like you’re just begging to forget something. Instead, this gives you a clean slate so you’re not still thinking about last week’s tasks.

Clear your mind and then start thinking only about what you need to do immediately, and then today. Tasks that need to be accomplished later in the week can wait.

Here’s a guide to help you empty your mind and think sharper:

How to Declutter Your Mind to Sharpen Your Brain and Fall Asleep Faster

2. Keep certain days clear.

Some companies are scheduling “No Meeting Wednesdays,” which means, funnily enough, that no one can hold a meeting on a Wednesday. This gives workers a full day to work on their own tasks, without getting sidetracked by other duties or pointless meetings.

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This can work in your personal life too, for example if you need to restrict Facebook access or limit phone calls.

3. Prioritize your work.

Don’t think every task is created equal! Some tasks aren’t as important as others, or might take less time.

Try to sort your tasks every day and see what can be done quickly and efficiently. Get these out of the way so you have more free time and brain power to focus on what is more important.

Lifehack’s CEO has a unique way to prioritize works, take a look at it here:

How to Prioritize Right in 10 Minutes and Work 10X Faster

4. Chop up your time.

Many successful business leaders chop their time up into fifteen-minute intervals. This means they work on tasks for a quarter of an hour at a time, or schedule meetings for only fifteen minutes. It makes each hour seem four times as long, which leads to more productivity!

5. Have a thinking position.

Truman Capote claimed he couldn’t think unless he was laying down. Proust did this as well, while Stravinsky would stand on his head!

What works for others may not work for you. Try to find a spot and position that is perfect for you to brainstorm or come up with ideas.

6. Pick three to five things you must do that day.

To Do lists can get overwhelming very quickly. Instead of making a never-ending list of everything you can think of that needs to be done, make daily lists that include just three to five things.

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Make sure they’re things that need to be done that day, so you don’t keep putting them off.

7. Don’t try to do too much.

OK, so I just told you to work every day, and now I’m telling you to not do too much? It might sound like conflicting advice, but not doing too much means not biting off more than you can chew. Don’t say yes to every work project or social engagement and find yourself in way over your head.

8. Have a daily action plan.

Don’t limit yourself to a to-do list! Take ten minutes every morning to map out a daily action plan. It’s a place to not only write what needs to be done that day, but also to prioritize what will bring the biggest reward, what will take the longest, and what goals will be accomplished.

Leave room for a “brain dump,” where you can scribble down anything else that’s on your mind.

9. Do your most dreaded project first.

Getting your most dreaded task over with first means you’ll have the rest of the day free for anything and everything else. This also means that you won’t be constantly putting off the worst of your projects, making it even harder to start on it later.

10. Follow the “Two-Minute Rule.”

The “Two-Minute Rule” was made famous by David Allen. It’s simple – if a new task comes in and it can be done in two minutes or less, do it right then. Putting it off just adds to your to-do list and will make the task seem more monumental later.

11. Have a place devoted to work.

If you work in an office, it’s no problem to say that your cubicle desk is where you work every day.

But if you work from home, make sure you have a certain area specifically for work. You don’t want files spread out all over the dinner table, and you don’t want to feel like you’re not working just because you’re relaxing on the couch.

Agatha Christie never wrote at her desk, she wrote wherever she could sit down. Ernest Hemingway wrote standing up. Thomas Wolfe, at 6’6″ tall, used the top of his refrigerator as a desk. Richard Wright wrote on a park bench, rain or shine.

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Have a space where, when you go there, you know you’re going to work. Maybe it’s a cafe downstairs, the library, or a meeting room. Whenever and wherever works for you, do your works there.

12. Find your golden hour.

You don’t have to stick to a “typical” 9–5 schedule!

Novelist Anne Rice slept during the day and wrote at night to avoid distractions. Writer Jerzy Kosinski slept eight hours a day, but never all at once. He’d wake in the morning, work, sleep four hours in the afternoon, then work more that evening.

Your golden hour is the time when you’re at your peak. You’re alert, ready to be productive, and intent on crossing things off your to-do list.

Once you find your best time, protect it with all your might. Make sure you’re always free to do your best uninterrupted work at this time.

13. Pretend you’re on an airplane.

It might not be possible to lock everyone out of your office to get some peace and quiet, but you can eliminate some distractions.

By pretending you’re on an airplane, you can act like your internet access is limited, you’re not able to get something from your bookcase, and you can’t make countless phone calls.

Eliminating these distractions will help you focus on your most important tasks and get them done without interruption.

14. Never stop.

Writers Anthony Trollope and Henry James started writing their next books as soon as they finished their current work in progress.

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Stephen King writes every day of the year, and holds himself accountable for 2,000 words a day! Mark Twain wrote every day, and then read his day’s work aloud to his family to get their feedback.

There’s something to be said about working nonstop, and putting out continuous work instead of taking a break. It’s just a momentum that will push you go further./

15. Be in tune with your body.

Your mind and body will get tired of a task after ninety minutes to two hours focused on it. Keep this in mind as you assign projects to yourself throughout the day, and take breaks to ensure that you won’t get burned out.

16. Try different methods.

Vladimir Nabokov wrote the first drafts of his novels on index cards. This made it easy to rearrange sentences, paragraphs, and chapters by shuffling the cards around.

It does sound easier, and more fun, than copying and pasting in Word! Once Nabokov liked the arrangement, his wife typed them into a single manuscript.

Same for you, don’t give up and think that it’s impossible for you to be productive when one method fails. Try different methods until you find what works perfectly for you.

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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