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How to Use Microresolutions to Improve Sales Performance

How to Use Microresolutions to Improve Sales Performance

When managers roll out major changes it can be a shock to everyone who has to comply with new rules. When handled incorrectly, disruptions can cause resentment and resistance that counteract productivity, and most companies can’t afford to waste that kind of time.

While certain things can’t be helped (e.g. new company software, new compliance laws, etc.), there are reasons you might want to take a different approach if it’s necessary to change employee behavior.

Sales employees can benefit from small, well-defined resolutions as a means of strengthening performance and company revenue rather than blanket procedural changes.

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What is a microresolution?

A microresolution is an achievable behavior change that employees can use to improve their day. It needs to be a clear goal, so generic calls for improvement will not do.

For example, let’s say an employee is having trouble making a strong first impression on their prospects. Considering that sales today is largely driven by the ability to teach the client about their own business, it might be a worthwhile resolution for the employee to start working on how to impart their best suggestions and tools as quickly and naturally as possible right at the start of a conversation. Or since people have more energy and resolve in the morning, it may make sense to have your reps tackle their hardest tasks before 11 a.m.

Inspiring employees

The amazing thing about these microresolutions is that they can and do apply to everyone. No one is above making better decisions in their day, and this is an excellent way to inspire employees to feel a resolved sense of purpose when they confront their daily tasks.

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Whether a person needs help in documenting their activities or they need assistance with executing a specific sales tactic, encouraging everyone to make one small resolution can be the start of some drastic changes in the office. So let’s say that a person takes care of their most hated task at 10 a.m. in the morning, they may feel so accomplished that they start doing more in the afternoon as well which ultimately leads to better-serviced accounts. The point of this exercise is to focus an employee’s attention on something they can do rather than bemoan the fact that the company is failing to hit a certain level of achievement.

Camaraderie

Just because a microresolution is easily definable, doesn’t mean that it will be easy to adjust to. It will take some experimentation to fully adapt the change into a day, but this experimentation is excellent for generating discussion and a sense of camaraderie.

With everyone working together to fix one of their shortcomings, it can help employees feel connected to one another for better teamwork and understanding. The key here will be to have everyone on board with completing this task and depending on the type of office environment, it may make sense to track that progress in a public way. This way, people can draw strength and advice from each other rather than feel like they are the only one who is struggling.

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Changes and adjustments

Let employees know that resolutions can grow into more ambitious goals, but only after the original resolution has been thoroughly mastered. This is why it’s so important for salespeople to set realistic goals. It’s also why reps should only work on one resolution at a time.

Someone who wants to get their numbers up by 70% may be setting themselves up for failure, while a field salesman who aims for a 10% revenue increase can always adjust their target after they’ve met their goal consistently over consecutive months. While change can sometimes be slow, the sense of pride and achievement an employee feels after hitting a personal goal is meant to be a jumping-off point for continued growth within the company. If you’re a sales manager, then you may want to suggest individual goals that you feel will be best to improve your reps’ performance.

The impact on sales

The more involved an employee is in their overall progress, the better their relationships and confidence will be with clients when making sales. By allowing a salesperson to see marked success in their days in one aspect, the comfort level they feel in their job should also rise.

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Every sales team is different, but there is no one who is immune to the pleasures of doing their job more effectively. If possible, implementing this type of program in a company should apply to everyone: senior executives, managers, and everyone in between. While it may take some time, using microresolutions on a consistent basis should lead to a lasting, positive impact on sales performance.

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Last Updated on May 24, 2019

How to Be Productive at Home and Make Every Day a Productive Day

How to Be Productive at Home and Make Every Day a Productive Day

If you’ve ever wondered how to be productive at home or how you could possibly have a more productive day, look no further.

Below you’ll find six easy tips that will help you make the most out of your time:

1. Create a Good Morning Routine

One of the best ways to start your day is to get up early and eat a healthy breakfast.

CEOs and other successful people have similar morning routines, which include exercising and quickly scanning their inboxes to find the most urgent tasks.[1]

You can also try writing first thing in the morning to warm up your brain[2] (750 words will help with that). But no matter what you choose to do, remember to create good morning habits so that you can have a more productive day.

If you aren’t sure how to make morning routine work for you, this guide will help you:

The Ultimate Morning Routine to Make You Happy And Productive All Day

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2. Prioritize

Sometimes we can’t have a productive day because we just don’t know where to start. When that’s the case, the most simple solution is to list everything you need to get accomplished, then prioritize these tasks based on importance and urgency.

Week Plan is a simple web app that will help you prioritize your week using the Covey time management grid. Here’s an example of it:[3]

    If you get the most pressing and important items done first, you will be able to be more productive while keeping stress levels down.

    Lifehack’s CEO, Leon, also has great advice on how to prioritize. Take a look at this article to learn more about it:

    How to Prioritize Right in 10 Minutes and Work 10X Faster

    3. Focus on One Thing at a Time

    One of the biggest killers of productivity is distractions. Whether it be noise or thoughts or games, distractions are a barrier to any productive day. That’s why it’s important to know where and when you work best.

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    Need a little background noise to keep you on track? Try working in a coffee shop.

    Can’t stand to hear even the ticking of a clock while writing? Go to a library and put in your headphones.

    Don’t be afraid to utilize technology to make the best of your time. Sites like [email protected] and Simply Noise can help keep you focused and productive all day long.

    And here’s some great apps to help you focus: 10 Online Apps for Better Focus

    4. Take Breaks

    Focusing, however, can drain a lot of energy and too much of it at once can quickly turn your productive day unproductive.

    To reduce mental fatigue while staying on task, try using the Pomodoro Technique. It requires working on a task for 25 minutes, then taking a short break before another 25 minute session.

    After four “pomodoro sessions,” be sure to take a longer break to rest and reflect.

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    I like to work in 25 and 5 minute increments, but you should find out what works best for you.

    5. Manage Your Time Effectively

    A learning strategies consultant once told me that there is no such thing as free time, only unstructured time.

    How do you know when exactly you have free time?

    By using the RescueTime app, you can see when you have free time, when you are productive, and when you actually waste time.

    With this data, you can better plan out your day and keep yourself on track.

    Moreover, you can increase the quality of low-intensity time. For example, reading the news while exercising or listening to meeting notes while cooking. Many of the mundane tasks we routinely accomplish can be paired with other tasks that lead to an overall more productive day.

    A bonus tip, even your real free time can be used productively, find out how:

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    20 Productive Ways to Use Your Free Time

    6. Celebrate and Reflect

    No matter how you execute a productive day, make sure to take time and celebrate what you’ve accomplished. It’s important to reward yourself so that you can continue doing great work. Plus, a reward system is an incredible motivator.

    Additionally, you should reflect on your day in order to find out what worked and what didn’t. Reflection not only increases future productivity, but also gives your brain time to decompress and de-stress.

    Try these 10 questions for daily self reflection.

    More Articles About Daily Productivity

    Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

    Reference

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