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5 Handy Details to Look Out for When Buying your Next Tablet

5 Handy Details to Look Out for When Buying your Next Tablet

For the past five years, the tablet market has been growing exponentially. Big brand names such as Google have been churning out some pretty breathtaking gadgets, usually at competitive prices. For instance, Google’s 10-inch 8 GB tablet PC is regularly ranked as the best tablet under 200 bucks on a number of review sites, which is a big steal for a device in its class.

Apple, which has largely led the tablet market since 2010, saw its tablet market share dwindle from a commanding 60% in 2012 to just over 26% in 2014. Samsung, Asus, Amazon, and Lenovo have played critical roles in saturating the market with alternative tablet options.

Of course, with more brands coming in, there is bound to be confusion for consumers looking to buy a tablet.

Terms such as Octa-core, NFC, Amoled, LTE, and other technical descriptions only increase the confusion, making an already difficult decision nearly impossible.

So how do you avoid the confusion and get a tablet that will not leave you cursing at technology? Simple. Start by understanding your needs.

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This will help you look at specs on a need basis and not simply because the tech guy at the store sounded convincing. So if you are a student, for instance, you can stick to tablets with low to medium specs – just enough to do assignments, read digital books, and link up with classmates.

That said, knowing a thing or two about some of the features of a tablet can help align your needs with the perfect tablet.

1. Size and Display

Tablet Shopping: 5 Handy Details to look out for When Getting your next Tablet

    The first thing that gets your attention when it comes to a tablet is its size. Tablets offer the perfect balance between a large smartphone and a netbook, so many tablets are often between 7 and 10 inches. Smaller 7-inch tablets are more portable when compared to their larger counterparts, which makes them perfect for people who are constantly on the move. And contrary to popular belief, 7-inchers can pack some serious specs, for instance, the iPad Mini 4.

    On the other hand, larger tablets tend to have a wider screen display, which makes them great for watching movies and playing games.

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    So if you are planning to watch movies, read eBooks, or write and edit spreadsheets and text documents, bigger, high-definition screens will work better for you. Keep in mind that with the larger 10-inch screens, you will have to sacrifice portability and a few more bucks.

    2. Processing Power

    Tablet Shopping: 5 Handy Details to look out for When Getting your next Tablet

      Processors are probably one of the most overlooked aspects of a tablet. Anything with two or more processing cores is often marketed as supreme, though other factors go into determining the performance of a processor.

      For instance, a tablet with two Intel processing cores (Dual-core) may have the same performance with one that comes with four or more AMD processing cores.

      You should also keep in mind that the more powerful a processor is, the faster your battery is going to drain. Powerful processors will also emit more heat and will typically come with larger tablets for more efficient heat management.

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      If you happen to go with a Windows tablet, the Intel Atom Z series and the newer Intel X series offer one of the best balances between battery life and performance, with the latter offering improved clock speeds for a faster processor.

      3. Battery Life

      Tablet Shopping: 5 Handy Details to look out for When Getting your next Tablet

        A tablet’s battery life is determined by usage, processing power, and the battery’s capacity, usually measured in Milliampere-hour (mAh). Tablets with a higher mAh rating will often last longer than one with a lower rating given the same usage pattern. You should also keep in mind that the more powerful a processor is, the more power it will suck out of your battery.

        The Lenovo Yoga Tab 3, which rocks a 6200 mAh battery – one of the largest to ever feature on a tablet – can withstand over 15 hours of movie watching and internet browsing. So always go for something with a higher mAh, especially if you plan on using the tablet for stuff like video editing or gaming.

        4. Operating System

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        Tablet Shopping: 5 Handy Details to look out for When Getting your next Tablet

          As it currently stands, there isn’t much to choose from when it comes to tablet operating systems. Many tablets will usually come with Apple iOS, Google Android, or Microsoft Windows. iOS is Apple’s flagship software platform that is used exclusively on Apple’s mobile devices. Users benefit from over 2 million applications on the App Store but not much in terms of customization.

          Google’s Android platform on tablets offers much more flexibility when it comes to applications. Users get a wider access to apps because you are not limited to Google’s app store. Microsoft Windows runs on Windows Tablet PCs and is fully compatible with desktop and laptop versions of the operating system.

          5. Extras

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            Like your smartphone, tablets should add some form of value to your life. For instance, a good 8 MP camera or more will let you take high-quality pictures for Facebook, Instagram or other social media portals. Other tabs also come with front-facing cameras, though these are usually of lower quality. However, if you already have a smartphone with a good camera, you can make large savings by opting for a tablet with a poorer camera.

            Another important aspect to consider when looking for a tablet is connectivity. Almost all tablets come with Wi-Fi support, though wireless technology is not always the same. For instance, 802.11b/g technology is a bit older than 802.11n and may negatively affect video streaming and heavy downloads.

            You can also opt for tablets with SIM card support that work with 4G and 3G networks. Though a bit pricier, these tablets will let you make calls, text, and access the internet where there is no Wi-Fi.

            Featured photo credit: http://pixabay.com/en/tablet-living-room-dog-woman-girl-843798/ via pixabay.com

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            Vikas Agrawal

            Vikas is the co-founder of Infobrandz, an Infographic design agency that offers creative visual content solutions to medium to large companies.

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            Last Updated on February 11, 2021

            Easily Misunderstood by Others? 6 Barriers You Should Overcome to Make Communication Less Frustrating

            Easily Misunderstood by Others? 6 Barriers You Should Overcome to Make Communication Less Frustrating

            How often have you said something simple, only to have the person who you said this to misunderstand it or twist the meaning completely around? Nodding your head in affirmative? Then this means that you are being unclear in your communication.

            Communication should be simple, right? It’s all about two people or more talking and explaining something to the other. The problem lies in the talking itself, somehow we end up being unclear, and our words, attitude or even the way of talking becomes a barrier in communication, most of the times unknowingly. We give you six common barriers to communication, and how to get past them; for you to actually say what you mean, and or the other person to understand it as well…

            The 6 Walls You Need to Break Down to Make Communication Effective

            Think about it this way, a simple phrase like “what do you mean” can be said in many different ways and each different way would end up “communicating” something else entirely. Scream it at the other person, and the perception would be anger. Whisper this is someone’s ear and others may take it as if you were plotting something. Say it in another language, and no one gets what you mean at all, if they don’t speak it… This is what we mean when we say that talking or saying something that’s clear in your head, many not mean that you have successfully communicated it across to your intended audience – thus what you say and how, where and why you said it – at times become barriers to communication.[1]

            Perceptual Barrier

            The moment you say something in a confrontational, sarcastic, angry or emotional tone, you have set up perceptual barriers to communication. The other person or people to whom you are trying to communicate your point get the message that you are disinterested in what you are saying and sort of turn a deaf ear. In effect, you are yelling your point across to person who might as well be deaf![2]

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            The problem: When you have a tone that’s not particularly positive, a body language that denotes your own disinterest in the situation and let your own stereotypes and misgivings enter the conversation via the way you talk and gesture, the other person perceives what you saying an entirely different manner than say if you said the same while smiling and catching their gaze.

            The solution: Start the conversation on a positive note, and don’t let what you think color your tone, gestures of body language. Maintain eye contact with your audience, and smile openly and wholeheartedly…

            Attitudinal Barrier

            Some people, if you would excuse the language, are simply badass and in general are unable to form relationships or even a common point of communication with others, due to their habit of thinking to highly or too lowly of them. They basically have an attitude problem – since they hold themselves in high esteem, they are unable to form genuine lines of communication with anyone. The same is true if they think too little of themselves as well.[3]

            The problem: If anyone at work, or even in your family, tends to roam around with a superior air – anything they say is likely to be taken by you and the others with a pinch, or even a bag of salt. Simply because whenever they talk, the first thing to come out of it is their condescending attitude. And in case there’s someone with an inferiority complex, their incessant self-pity forms barriers to communication.

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            The solution: Use simple words and an encouraging smile to communicate effectively – and stick to constructive criticism, and not criticism because you are a perfectionist. If you see someone doing a good job, let them know, and disregard the thought that you could have done it better. It’s their job so measure them by industry standards and not your own.

            Language Barrier

            This is perhaps the commonest and the most inadvertent of barriers to communication. Using big words, too much of technical jargon or even using just the wrong language at the incorrect or inopportune time can lead to a loss or misinterpretation of communication. It may have sounded right in your head and to your ears as well, but if sounded gobbledygook to the others, the purpose is lost.

            The problem: Say you are trying to explain a process to the newbies and end up using every technical word and industry jargon that you knew – your communication has failed if the newbie understood zilch. You have to, without sounding patronizing, explain things to someone in the simplest language they understand instead of the most complex that you do.

            The solution: Simplify things for the other person to understand you, and understand it well. Think about it this way: if you are trying to explain something scientific to a child, you tone it down to their thinking capacity, without “dumbing” anything down in the process.[4]

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            Emotional Barrier

            Sometimes, we hesitate in opening our mouths, for fear of putting our foot in it! Other times, our emotional state is so fragile that we keep it and our lips zipped tightly together lest we explode. This is the time that our emotions become barriers to communication.[5]

            The problem: Say you had a fight at home and are on a slow boil, muttering, in your head, about the injustice of it all. At this time, you have to give someone a dressing down over their work performance. You are likely to transfer at least part of your angst to the conversation then, and talk about unfairness in general, leaving the other person stymied about what you actually meant!

            The solution: Remove your emotions and feelings to a personal space, and talk to the other person as you normally would. Treat any phobias or fears that you have and nip them in the bud so that they don’t become a problem. And remember, no one is perfect.

            Cultural Barrier

            Sometimes, being in an ever-shrinking world means that inadvertently, rules can make cultures clash and cultural clashes can turn into barriers to communication. The idea is to make your point across without hurting anyone’s cultural or religious sentiments.

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            The problem: There are so many ways culture clashes can happen during communication and with cultural clashes; it’s not always about ethnicity. A non-smoker may have problems with smokers taking breaks; an older boss may have issues with younger staff using the Internet too much.

            The solution: Communicate only what is necessary to get the point across – and eave your personal sentiments or feelings out of it. Try to be accommodative of the other’s viewpoint, and in case you still need to work it out, do it one to one, to avoid making a spectacle of the other person’s beliefs.[6]

            Gender Barrier

            Finally, it’s about Men from Mars and Women from Venus. Sometimes, men don’t understand women and women don’t get men – and this gender gap throws barriers in communication. Women tend to take conflict to their graves, literally, while men can move on instantly. Women rely on intuition, men on logic – so inherently, gender becomes a big block in successful communication.[7]

            The problem: A male boss may inadvertently rub his female subordinates the wrong way with anti-feminism innuendoes, or even have problems with women taking too many family leaves. Similarly, women sometimes let their emotions get the better of them, something a male audience can’t relate to.

            The solution: Talk to people like people – don’t think or classify them into genders and then talk accordingly. Don’t make comments or innuendos that are gender biased – you don’t have to come across as an MCP or as a bra-burning feminist either. Keep gender out of it.

            And remember, the key to successful communication is simply being open, making eye contact and smiling intermittently. The battle is usually half won when you say what you mean in simple, straightforward words and keep your emotions out of it.

            Reference

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