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7 Common Issues That Hinder an Online User Experience

7 Common Issues That Hinder an Online User Experience

Having a website in the modern age can be rewarding as long as it is operated in the right way. Any website that doesn’t conform could find itself gathering virtual dust within the online sphere.

It is believed that mobile-connected devices will account for 68 percent of all Internet traffic by 2017. While these kinds of numbers can be exciting for webmasters, websites that fail to offer the best possible user experience online will often fall by the wayside.

In order to ensure the best possible user experience and a seamless conversion process, ensure that your site isn’t making these 7 user experience mistakes.

1. Lack of Social Sign-Up and Logins

The filling in of registration forms is something that many try to avoid online, simply because the task can be monotonous at best. However, as social networking continues to gain more traction in the online world, so do the features it offers.

Having the option to log in or sign up via a social network ensures that you provide a seamless experience for users to get started and view the content, which eventually, can lead to an increase in subscribers and customers.

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Solution: If running a community or a subscription based website, ensure to implement social sign-ups and log-ins that don’t require users to fill in a lengthy contact form, and avoids email verifications.

2. Poor Navigation and Hidden Pages

The lack of clean and simple navigation can quickly ruin the experience that users have with the site. Usually, visitors wouldn’t be willing to make more than 3-4 clicks to get to the desired page.

Unless the website is over 10,000 pages, webmasters & designers need to ensure that all pages are properly structured and categorised under relevant “parent” pages.

Solution: Use a clear menu structure with top-level pages and sub-pages. Categorise the pages that you wish users to navigate to in a proper manner. As an example, list your services pages under the main “Services” or “What we Offer” page.

3. Not optimised for mobile

Although the Internet has evolved, that doesn’t mean that every website adapts to a mobile & tablet screens. According to Marketing Land, mobile traffic accounts for more than 50% of all the traffic. Those who have not updated their website will find that their users have less-than-stellar experience when navigating the site, often having to pinch in and out screen, zoom in and out, and use awkward button placements to find their way around the website.

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Mobile users who are not able to navigate a site that is not responsive will often look elsewhere, which can be detrimental to your sales turnover.

Solution: Ensure to invest into a mobile and tablet versions of the site. If using WordPress, this just comes down to choosing the right responsive theme that will automatically adjust to the screen size.

4. Excessive Pop-ups

Although the vast majority of people have developed an immunity against pop-ups, some of us still feel frustrated when there is an excessive number of pop-ups asking to sign-up for the email updates with a tiny grey text saying “No, I don’t want to”.

Yes, pop-ups are an effective way to increase your email database and encourage social sharing, as long as this strategy is not overused to the point when people get frustrated and annoyed with the site.

Solution:

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  • Don’t place multiple pop-ups on a single web page.
  • Make sure that your pop-ups are relevant. For example, you wouldn’t want to show an email sign-up to a person who has already signed up.
  • Ensure that those pop-ups are easy to close.

5. Complicated Contact Forms

Almost every website uses contact forms, whether it’s as simple “contact us” or a transactional form. One of the most common issues that sites make is to do with lengthy forms & unnecessary fields. Far too often, websites add irrelevant fields when trying to get as much information as possible in one go. Who would want to fill in a 10-minute contact form just to get in touch? Yes, no one, especially if you are on a mobile.

Solution: Keep the form fields to a minimum, and only ask for the relevant information. What would people think when your site is asking for their address just to receive a quote? Yes, that you would probably post a bunch of annoying leaflets.

6. Poorly Written Content

Poorly written content has been a bugbear of the online world in the past. During the early days of the Internet, it wasn’t unusual to enter a search term and be greeted with a series of online sites that offered nothing but a series of ads.

In a bid to contend with the poorly-written content, Google introduced a number of algorithm updates that looked to ensure that any content being presented to an online audience was informative and relevant.

As such, websites had to ensure that content matched that of the keywords being searched. If it didn’t, it would simply fall down the results page. As such, it’s now more important than ever to ensure that any content being produced for your website is written professionally as well as being informative.

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Solution: Ensure that your provide a regular stream of top notch quality content that is targeted to provide accurate and useful information to the user.

7. Online Users Who Are Kept Waiting

While it’s not always the fault of the webmaster, any servers that struggle with the downloading of information will often affect the user experience, normally meaning that they will abort the action they were trying to perform, which could be an all-important sign-up, or a potential customer.

Furthermore, users would not normally wait for more than 4 seconds for the site to load. Hence, if your site speed is greater than 4 seconds, users are very likely to leave the site.

Solution:

  • Choose a good hosting provider
  • Implement a CDN (Content Delivery Network)
  • Minify and Combine CSS & Javascript files
  • Install a good caching plugin
  • Optimise, compress and scale your images
  • Minimise DNS lookups

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Dmytro Spilka

Head Wizard

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Last Updated on May 14, 2019

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

  1. Zoho Notebook
    If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
  2. Evernote
    The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
  3. Net Notes
    If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
  4. i-Lighter
    You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
  5. Clipmarks
    For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
  6. UberNote
    If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
  7. iLeonardo
    iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
  8. Zotero
    Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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