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5 Useful Tips When Buying a Mobile Phone for Your Teen

5 Useful Tips When Buying a Mobile Phone for Your Teen

It is now that age when your child is constantly hounding you to buy them their cell phone. They want their independence and quite frankly, you are tired of sharing your mobile phone with them.

In this article, I am sharing a few ideas on how to select the best cell phone for your teenager. But first, let us first understand why your child needs this gadget.

Benefits of mobile phones for kids

It is common for parents to be a tad apprehensive about buying cell phones for their teenage children. You worry that they will get distracted in math class or they will text, and jaywalk or they will befriend a drug dealer. If these concerns have crossed your mind at one point, do not worry, you are in good company. So, what are the advantages of buying a phone for your child?

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  • Independence : Once you give them a phone, you can now rest easy without having to answer phone calls and passing on the message. Your secretarial duties will be over once you hand them that little box. However, reduce cell phone usage and encourage face to face conversations on a regular basis.
  • Useful applications: Thinking of buying your teen a feature phone? Go the smart way instead. Smartphones come with a myriad of apps that do amazing things in our lives. Your teenager will be the first to admit how important these applications are. These applications “apps” go beyond fun and games; there are some child-friendly apps that are geared towards homework. Examples of these educational apps are Math Tricks, Learn Driving, NASA, World History Questions, etc.
  • Communication: When your child has a mobile phone with them, it becomes much easier to reach them rather than having to call the home where they are visiting or the front desk at the pizza deli. You can know what your child is up to, who they are with, and most importantly when they are coming home.

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    How do I make the right choice?

    Now that we understand the main benefits of giving your child a mobile phone let us find out how you can go about that.

    1. Research

    Sounds cliché, but you can never underestimate the power of proper research. Advanced phones help us accomplish numerous tasks with just a click of a button. Mobile phones with such enhanced features are popularly known as Smartphones. Research on the best cell phones available and make a list of your top five considerations. The iPhone 7 is likely to make the cut. Maybe the iphone 7 manual can help you learn more about this apple flagship.

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    2. Narrow down the list

    Involve your teen in the selection process. Otherwise, you end up with a grumpy teenager and a cell phone abandoned on the kitchen counter. Present your list of possible options and go through the features of each model. Allow your teen to voice their opinion about each phone and whether they would consider it or not. If they are displeased with a particular model, cross it off the list and move to the next one.

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      3. Phone shopping

      After narrowing down the list, it is now time to go shopping. Take a trip to the mall and bring your teen to make the selection. Please beware; they are likely to get carried away by the sheer size of phone collection on the counter. While looking at other brands is not a bad idea, stick to the list at hand. Otherwise, be prepared to spend all day at the mall.

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      4. Cell phone plan

      Once you have made the perfect selection, the next step is signing up for a cell phone plan. Since your teen may not have much information on payment plans, your best bet is your own cell phone plan. If you are content with your payment plan, look no further. Sign them up, and they are ready to go! Remember to insure the phone against theft or malfunctioning with these tips.

      5. Ground rules

      Laying down some ground rules is as important as buying the right model of cell phone. Establish a mobile phone curfew; no phones in the classroom, at the dinner table and most importantly while driving. With a Smartphone, your teen has unlimited access to the internet, and this can be dangerous. Install parental controls on their phone to limit their browsing to pre-approved websites. Limit phone usage at tight to avoid messing up with their bedtime curfew and other problems such as temporary blindness. See the infographic below:

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        Conclusion

        If you have received a text from a fourteen-year-old full of emoji that you do not understand, then it is time to oblige and purchase a mobile phone for your teen. Make the leap and keep watch.

        Featured photo credit: http://pixabay.com/en/beautiful-girl-smiling-young-woman-1687946/ via pixabay.com

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        The Gentle Art of Saying No

        The Gentle Art of Saying No

        No!

        It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments — you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time.

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        But requests for your time are coming in all the time — through phone, email, IM or in person. To stay productive, and minimize stress, you have to learn the Gentle Art of Saying No — an art that many people have problems with.

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        What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

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        But it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here are the Top 10 tips for learning the Gentle Art of Saying No:

        1. Value your time. Know your commitments, and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it. And tell them that: “I just can’t right now … my plate is overloaded as it is.”
        2. Know your priorities. Even if you do have some extra time (which for many of us is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time? For myself, I know that more commitments means less time with my wife and kids, who are more important to me than anything.
        3. Practice saying no. Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word. And sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.
        4. Don’t apologize. A common way to start out is “I’m sorry but …” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm, and unapologetic about guarding your time.
        5. Stop being nice. Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. But if you erect a wall, they will look for easier targets. Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.
        6. Say no to your boss. Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss — they’re our boss, right? And if we say “no” then we look like we can’t handle the work — at least, that’s the common reasoning. But in fact, it’s the opposite — explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.
        7. Pre-empting. It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting, “Look guys, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”
        8. Get back to you. Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, simply tell them: “After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.” At least you gave it some consideration.
        9. Maybe later. If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say, “This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].” Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands.
        10. It’s not you, it’s me. This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time. Simply say so — you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization … but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true — people can sense insincerity.

        Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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