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15 Delectable No-Bake Desserts That’ll Sweeten This Fall

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15 Delectable No-Bake Desserts That’ll Sweeten This Fall

The season of fall is here, and we know what that means no-baked desserts which contain pumpkin spice, apple desserts, and a whole lot of nutty flavors. But did you know that you can make fall-flavored desserts without turning on the oven? It’s true. So here are 15 delectable no-bake fall desserts.

1. Pumpkin mousse pie

pumpkin-mousse-pie

    For this dessert, you’ll need to mix pumpkin puree, cream cheese, and whipping cream and flavor it with pumpkin spices. The mixture is spread over a ready-made or graham cracker crust. The mousse mixture is ready to eat after 2 hours in the fridge. To get the full recipe, click here.

    2. Cake batter truffles

    cake-batter-truffles

      These lovely truffles are a great treat for your guests, and they’re healthy foods too. The main ingredients here are yellow cake mix and white almond bark. The vanilla extract adds to the flavor of these melt-in-your-mouth truffles. To get the full recipe, click here.

      3. No-bake apple pie bites

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      no-bake-apple-pie-bites

        These little treats are the mini versions of apple pie. All you need to do to is cook the apples with lemon juice and spices to make a filling and put the mixture into mini phyllo shells. Top it off with whipped cream and served at room temperature. To get the full recipe, click here.

        4. No-bake white chocolate pumpkin fudge

        no-bake-white-chocolate-pumpkin-fudge

          If you’re looking for the best diet plan for weight loss, then this fall dessert is for you. The sweetness comes from white chocolate and pumpkin puree that you’ll need to melt together and refrigerate. To get the full recipe, click here.

          5. No-bake pumpkin icebox cake

          no-bake-pumpkin-icebox-cake

            It takes just a couple of minutes to whip this mouthful of cozy fall flavors. To make this creamy dessert, you need to layer graham crackers between a creamy mix of pumpkin puree, cream cheese, and whipped cream. To get the full recipe, click here.

            6. No-bake sweet potato cake

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            no-bake-sweet-potato-cake

              This is a dense, rich, and chocolaty dessert with coconut sugar that some consider a diabetic food. Sweet potato, cocoa powder, and shredded coconut are mixed to make this densely-textured dessert that is ready in just under 20 minutes. You can also substitute the coconut sugar with dates for an even healthier alternative. To get the full recipe, click here.

              7. Uptown figs

              uptown-figs

                The combination of salty and sweet flavors may seem unusual at first, but once you’ve had a taste of these simple and healthy treats, you’ll understand why they’re all the craze lately. All you need is a whole bunch of figs, salted almonds, powdered sugar, and orange liqueur. To get the full recipe, click here.

                8. No-bake pumpkin pie jars

                no-bake-pumpkin-pie-jars

                  The texture of this dessert is smooth and satisfying. It’s essentially a fall version of summer trifles. The recipe asks for pumpkin puree, cream cheese, and marshmallows which blend like a dream. The cookie layer adds just a bit of texture to perfect the dish. To get the full recipe, click here.

                  9. No-bake chocolate, fig, and date slices

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                  no-bake-chocolate-fig-and-date-slices

                    These are perfect desserts for the holiday seasons as they ooze with the aroma of orange, Grand Marnier, and honey. The soft texture comes from the slices if dried fruit mixed in melted chocolate. Once the mixture is cooled, it is ready to be sliced into bite-size pieces. To get the full recipe, click here.

                    10. Zuccotto

                    zuccotto

                      You’ll be sure to impress your guests with this doomed-shaped liqueur flavored cake. The recipe requires semicircle cuts from a round sponge cake arranged around a layer of orange, ricotta, and cream filling. To get the full recipe, click here.

                      11. No-bake pumpkin pecan ice cream pie

                      no-bake-pumpkin-pecan-ice-cream-pie

                        Pecans and pumpkins make the perfect fall combo. We’re sure this cool dessert will impress your guests at your Thanksgiving celebration. This recipe involves simple ingredient layering and freezing, so it’s good when you’re short of time. To get the full recipe, click here.

                        12. Banoffee pies

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                        banoffee-pies

                          Crunchy Anzac buckets topped with bananas, caramel, and cream makes this dessert everyone’s favorite. You’ll need a couple of small tart tins to make individual pies. The Anzac biscuits make for the base layer that is topped with creamy caramel and whipped cream. To get the full recipe, click here.

                          13. Pumpkin Apple no-bake dessert

                          pumpkin-apple-no-bake-dessert

                            Cinnamon, graham crackers crust topped with a layer of pumpkin puree and apple pie filling and garnished with whipped cream makes for this delightful fall dessert. To get the full recipe, click here.

                            14. Chia, almond, and cacao balls

                            chia-almond-and-cacao-balls

                              Although this recipe requires a lot of ingredients, the process of making these flavorful and chewy balls is quite simple. You essentially just need to mix the ingredients in a certain order, and the dessert is ready in around 30 minutes. To get the full recipe, click here.

                              15. Choc-banana cheesecake

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                              choc-banana-cheesecake

                                For those looking for guilt-free indulgence, this low-calorie cheesecake is the perfect combo. The recipe is pretty simple. Just layer the biscuits in a greased spring form pan and mixing the other ingredients for the filling. After a night in the freezer, the dessert is ready for serving. To get the full recipe, click here.

                                Featured photo credit: OneGreenPlanet via google.com

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                                Evlin Symon

                                Evlin Symon is a health and wellness expert specialized in fitness, weight loss, pregnancy, nutrition and beauty.

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                                Last Updated on January 27, 2022

                                5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

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                                5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

                                Food plays an integral role in our lives and rightfully so: the food we eat is intricately intertwined with our culture. You can learn a lot about a particular culture by exploring their food. In fact, it may be difficult to fully define a culture without a nod to their cuisine.

                                “Tell me what you eat, and I’ll tell you who you are.” – Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1825).

                                Don’t believe me? Here’s why food is the best way to understand a culture:

                                Food is a universal necessity.

                                It doesn’t matter where in the world you’re from – you have to eat. And your societal culture most likely evolved from that very need, the need to eat. Once they ventured beyond hunting and gathering, many early civilizations organized themselves in ways that facilitated food distribution and production. That also meant that the animals, land and resources you were near dictated not only what you’d consume, but how you’d prepare and cook it. The establishment of the spice trade and the merchant silk road are two example of the great lengths many took to obtain desirable ingredients.

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                                Food preservation techniques are unique to climates and lifestyle.

                                Ever wonder why the process to preserve meat is so different around the world? It has to do with local resources, needs, and climates. In Morocco, Khlea is a dish composed of dried beef preserved in spices and then packed in animal fat. When preserved correctly, it’s still good for two years when stored at room temperature. That makes a lot of sense in Morocco, where the country historically has had a strong nomadic population, desert landscape, and extremely warm, dry temperatures.

                                Staples of a local cuisines illustrate historical eating patterns.

                                Some societies have cuisines that are entirely based on meat, and others are almost entirely plant-based. Some have seasonal variety and their cuisines change accordingly during different parts of the year. India’s cuisine is extremely varied from region to region, with meat and wheat heavy dishes in the far north, to spectacular fish delicacies in the east, to rice-based vegetarian diets in the south, and many more variations in between.

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                                The western part of India is home to a group of strict vegetarians: they not only avoid flesh and eggs, but even certain strong aromatics like garlic, or root vegetables like carrots and potatoes. Dishes like Papri Chat, featuring vegetable based chutneys mixed with yoghurt, herbs and spices are popular.

                                Components of popular dishes can reveal cultural secrets.

                                This is probably the most intriguing part of studying a specific cuisine. Certain regions of the world have certain ingredients easily available to them. Most people know that common foods such as corn, tomatoes, chili peppers, and chocolate are native to the Americas, or “New World”. Many of today’s chefs consider themselves to be extremely modern when fusing cuisines, but cultural lines blended long ago when it comes to purity of ingredients.

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                                Black pepper originated in Asia but became, and still remains, a critical part of European cuisine. The Belgians are some of the finest chocolatiers, despite it not being native to the old world. And perhaps one of the most interesting result from the blending of two cuisines is Chicken Tikka Masala; it resembles an Indian Mughali dish, but was actually invented by the British!

                                Food tourism – it’s a whole new way to travel.

                                Some people have taken the intergation of food and culture to a new level. No trip they take is complete with out a well-researched meal plan, that dictates not only the time of year for their visit, but also how they will experience a new culture.

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                                So, a food tourist won’t just focus on having a pint at Oktoberfest, but will be interested in learning the German beer making process, and possibly how they can make their own fresh brew. Food tourists visit many of the popular mainstays for traditional tourism, like New York City, San Francisco, London, or Paris, but many locations that they frequent, such as Armenia or Laos, may be off the beaten path for most travelers. And since their interest in food is more than meal deep, they have the chance to learn local preparation techniques that can shed insight into a whole other aspect of a particular region’s culture.

                                Featured photo credit: Young Shih via unsplash.com

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