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5 Ways to Secure Data on Your Phone

5 Ways to Secure Data on Your Phone

Our mobile phones and portable devices reveal a lot about us. If it were to fall into the wrong hands, someone could see the most personal things. From our saved favorites and bookmarks on web pages, to the emails we send/receive, and even the apps we use! This small, but vulnerable, piece of technology knows everything that makes us who we are. Interestingly, we have stopped trusting our family and friends with this personal stuff and started trusting the mobile phones. Although this goes without saying, I would caution how much trust we put on these devices. The simple fact is, most of us do not even have our phones password-protected because of the inconvenience and time it takes to unlock the screen. As more function and updates become available on our devices, we must ensure we protect its privacy and security. How do we do it? Let’s find out!

1. Use an Anti-Virus Software

Viruses and malware are the biggest threats in the digital age. They not only give you a hard time working on your gadgets including mobile phones, they also lead to loss of personal information. A modern day virus program is written in a way that it not only destroys the data on your phone but it can leak your important personal stuff like social security number, credit card information, browsing history and your photos to name a few. Thus, installing an Antivirus is not only recommended, but an utmost necessity.

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2. Remote Wiping and Anti-Theft

In the case of mobile phone theft, the first thing that you should be doing is remotely locking your phone and wiping its memory to prevent loss of information. The latest phones have this feature built into them from the factories and if you haven’t explored it yet, you should probably look into it. This feature allows you to access your phone remotely through the internet, wipe all the data on it and then lock itself on its own with a hard-to-crack password. While this may not help you with getting back the phone, it can surely help you erase your private data.

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3. Preventing Unauthorized Access

Your phone cannot be near you all the time. There are situations when you have to give up your phone and stay away from it. However, this is no reason why your privacy should not be guarded. The best solution in such times is to install an app locker and password-protect your media files and applications. An app locker is a simple application that provides a means to lock your personal stuff and prevent unauthorized access to these things. A next generation app locker like Hexlock goes a step further and gives you many settings and options to safeguard yourself. Fingerprint unlocking, Uninstall prevention, and Parental controls are just a few of the benefits these types of programs can offer.

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4. Install Only Trusted Apps

Most of the mobile users do not realize the fact that apps are the new method of data theft. While the official marketplaces like iTunes and Play Store ensure that no malicious or dirty, tricky apps go live on their marketplace, not every source of apps is this secure. Most of the marketplaces or websites do not even care about your security, leave alone implementing it. Thus, staying away from untrusted sources and reading the reviews before installing any application or game is highly important. Any app that asks for the access to your bank account or credit card should always be on your security radar. Another thing that you should note is the app permissions box. This pops up just before you install any app. If you see unnecessary permissions, deselect it!

5. Secure Your Network

If avoidable, never ever connect to a public network or an open Wi-Fi because once connected, you can be an easy victim. Even if you connect, refrain from making any money related transactions or logging into bank accounts. Doing so might compromise your banking details and eventually give you a financial blow. While using a VPN could protect you and secure your data being sent, I do not feel confident over a public network especially if the VPN service (software) is open/free. Encrypting your data is very important nonetheless!

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Last Updated on May 14, 2019

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

  1. Zoho Notebook
    If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
  2. Evernote
    The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
  3. Net Notes
    If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
  4. i-Lighter
    You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
  5. Clipmarks
    For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
  6. UberNote
    If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
  7. iLeonardo
    iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
  8. Zotero
    Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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