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Can Quantum Theory Attract a Better Life?

Can Quantum Theory Attract a Better Life?

There are many notions that suggest our thoughts have power. Whether these thoughts are kept to ourselves or kept internal is irrelevant. If it passes through our mind, it potentially has the power to affect our reality.

With that comes the idea that by shaping our thoughts, we can shape our world into a more ideal state. And it’s all explained by Quantum theory.

What is Quantum Theory?

Quantum theory focuses on the ideas behind quantum physics. While the idiosyncrasies of the study of quantum physics can be quite complex, some of the basic tenants are fairly easy to grasp.

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One prime example was demonstrated through the famous double slit experiment. This experiment determined that particles will behave differently when they are observed, suggesting that the intent of the observer can affect the outcome of the experiment.

The idea of attracting a better life is also associated with the concepts behind quantum entanglement. Quantum entanglement suggests an interconnectedness between all things.

By focusing your thoughts and actions in a particular direction, you can theoretically have an influence over the thing that you desire, drawing it towards you.

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How Can Quantum Physics Give You a Better Life?

The most simplified version of the answer is that you attract into your life what you think about. This can include conscious and subconscious thoughts. By training yourself to think in the proper way, you can bring certain things or events into your reality. Dr Eric Amidi adds that our observations impact the reality being observed, allowing our thoughts and perceptions to affect that reality.

To bring more positive things into your life, you must train yourself to expect them to occur. Alternatively, some choose to think as though their desired outcome has already occurred, as this promotes the necessary mind-set. The shift in mindset would impact how you see the world, allowing your observations to shift your reality into a more favourable state.

Does It Work?

The biggest question about attracting a better life for yourself is simply, does it work? While it is hard to determine how well it functions scientifically, there are indications that a change in mindset can yield positive results. For example, many of the thoughts you would focus on are considered to be optimistic in nature.

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Some studies have suggested that people who consider themselves to be optimistic, experience benefits in life. The benefits can include improved health and higher levels of achievement.

Optimists also seem to experience fewer detrimental effects associated with stress and may even live longer. In some cases, self-described optimists even consider themselves to be luckier than their brethren with cloudier dispositions.

Whether the optimists are attracting more positive influences in their life, or if they are simply more prepared to notice them, is a bit unknown. Regardless, maintaining a more positive mindset apparently has advantages.

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What Does It Hurt?

The biggest reason to consider these ideas is that it doesn’t appear to pose a risk. Trying to be more optimistic, focusing on positive ideas and perceiving yourself as luckier doesn’t threaten your current state of being in a meaningful way.

In fact, the change in mindset may even have a variety of fringe benefits regardless of whether you are able to manifest a certain thing into your life.

Since the risk is incredibly low and the potential for rewards are fairly high, maybe it is worth a try. Consider becoming an observer of your own thoughts throughout the day. Identify the thoughts that are supportive and positive and acknowledge the number that are critical or harmful.

Replace the more negative thought patterns with positive ones, and see where it takes you. Even if you just have the chance to feel better on a daily basis, it very well could be worth a try.

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Last Updated on September 10, 2018

Overcoming The Pain Of A Breakup: 3 Suggestions Based On Science

Overcoming The Pain Of A Breakup: 3 Suggestions Based On Science

We thought that the expression ‘broken heart’ was just a metaphor, but science is telling us that it is not: breakups and rejections do cause physical pain. When a group of psychologists asked research participants to look at images of their ex-partners who broke up with them, researchers found that the same brain areas that are activated by physical pain are also activated by looking at images of ex-partners. Looking at images of our ex is a painful experience, literally.[1].

Given that the effect of rejections and breakups is the same as the effect of physical pain, scientists have speculated on whether the practices that reduce physical pain could be used to reduce the emotional pain that follows from breakups and rejections. In a study on whether painkillers reduce the emotional pain caused by a breakup, researchers found that painkillers did help. Individuals who took painkillers were better able to deal with their breakup. Tamar Cohen wrote that “A simple dose of paracetamol could help ease the pain of a broken heart.”[2]

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Just like painkillers can be used to ease the pain of a broken heart, other practices that ease physical pain can also be used to ease the pain of rejections and breakups. Three of these scientifically validated practices are presented in this article.

Looking at images of loved ones

While images of ex-partners stimulate the pain neuro-circuitry in our brain, images of loved ones activate a different circuitry. Looking at images of people who care about us increases the release of oxytocin in our body. Oxytocin, or the “cuddle hormone,” is the hormone that our body relies on to induce in us a soothing feeling of tranquility, even when we are under high stress and pain.

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In fact, oxytocin was found to have a crucial role as a mother is giving birth to her baby. Despite the extreme pain that a mother has to endure during delivery, the high level of oxytocin secreted by her body transforms pain into pleasure. Mariem Melainine notes that, “Oxytocin levels are usually at their peak during delivery, which promotes a sense of euphoria in the mother and helps her develop a stronger bond with her baby.”[3]

Whenever you feel tempted to look at images of your ex-partner, log into your Facebook page and start browsing images of your loved ones. As Eva Ritvo, M.D. notes, “Facebook fools our brain into believing that loved ones surround us, which historically was essential to our survival. The human brain, because it evolved thousands of years before photography, fails on many levels to recognize the difference between pictures and people”[4]

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Exercise

Endorphins are neurotransmitters that reduce our perception of pain. When our body is high on endorphins, painful sensations are kept outside of conscious awareness. It was found that exercise causes endorphins to be secreted in the brain and as a result produce a feeling of power, as psychologist Alex Korb noted in his book: “Exercise causes your brain to release endorphins, neurotransmitters that act on your neurons like opiates (such as morphine or Vicodin) by sending a neural signal to reduce pain and provide anxiety relief.”[5] By inhibiting pain from being transmitted to our brain, exercise acts as a powerful antidote to the pain caused by rejections and breakups.

Meditation

Jon Kabat Zinn, a doctor who pioneered the use of mindfulness meditation therapy for patients with chronic pain, has argued that it is not pain itself that is harmful to our mental health, rather, it is the way we react to pain. When we react to pain with irritation, frustration, and self-pity, more pain is generated, and we enter a never ending spiral of painful thoughts and sensations.

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In order to disrupt the domino effect caused by reacting to pain with pain, Kabat Zinn and other proponents of mindfulness meditation therapy have suggested reacting to pain through nonjudgmental contemplation and acceptance. By practicing meditation on a daily basis and getting used to the habit of paying attention to the sensations generated by our body (including the painful ones and by observing these sensations nonjudgmentally and with compassion) our brain develops the habit of reacting to pain with grace and patience.

When you find yourself thinking about a recent breakup or a recent rejection, close your eyes and pay attention to the sensations produced by your body. Take deep breaths and as you are feeling the sensations produced by your body, distance yourself from them, and observe them without judgment and with compassion. If your brain starts wandering and gets distracted, gently bring back your compassionate nonjudgmental attention to your body. Try to do this exercise for one minute and gradually increase its duration.

With consistent practice, nonjudgmental acceptance will become our default reaction to breakups, rejections, and other disappointments that we experience in life. Every rejection and every breakup teaches us great lessons about relationships and about ourselves.

Featured photo credit: condesign via pixabay.com

Reference

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