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Why Millenials Have to Rethink Their Reading Habits

Why Millenials Have to Rethink Their Reading Habits

I was at a family dinner; a relative was discussing a book he had just read and asked me if I had read it. Before I could answer an annoying sibling answered for me, ‘Oh, she doesn’t read books, only social media’, Stupid, of course, I read books, didn’t I? I then tried to remember the last book I had read and realised I couldn’t.

I knew of The Man Booker Prize list which the current topic of conversation was on, but to discuss any of the books on the shortlist, No. I did do an online search, so I could hold my own in the conversation, but wasn’t that exactly what my annoying sibling was intimating? I decided to look more into it; was I odd or an example of millennials everywhere, I found I fit in nicely with Gen Y.

Apparently, millennials do read, but what we read is mostly dictated by its usefulness, its newsworthiness. We devour social news, current events in the lives of friends and strangers. We like bullet notes and what to do lists, we read to connect with others. What we do not do is read for ourselves, to take time out, to relax. I want to share some of the facts that are making me rethink reading a book.

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1. Books stimulate our brain

Every time we read a book we open new neural pathways, (synapses), this says we are stimulating the brain, keeping it functioning and fresh. Recent research on brain patterns shows our interactions and interpretation of what we read creates a mental simulation in our senses, opening them up for more experiences. 

If we want the ability to change and adapt our fixed neural pathways and keep our brains agile and functioning quickly; we need to read more. Reading books introduces our brains to new stimuli, it adds to our perceptions of others and keeps our leadership and managing skills from stagnating.

2. Reading stops you from multitasking

Millennials tend to run around with an ADD disorder, doing 10 things at once, working, checking emails, checking Facebook, Pinterest and other favourite social media outlets, updating our Linkedin. Reading a book helps destress you, focusing your mind down to first gear rather than running in third all the time, gives you mind and body time to relax, a single focus.

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3. Reading teaches us to actually read

As millennials we respond to infographics, visual content, quick to process, quick to scan. Reading a book involves a different skill, but we can enhance our vocabulary, our focus and concentration and our analytical skills. All of which, I think we would all agree has value in our lives and careers.

Reading skills are something we need to think about as we become parents, what habits will we pass to our children. Will we limit them if we are not seen to read or encourage reading? Now as adults, we have a wide range of access to books, either physically from bookshelves and libraries or digitally via our Ipad’s and ebook readers.

But be aware, for children, a study has indicated that an actual book is better than a screen. It is also said reading from a screen at night disturbs our sleep in a way, a book does not, but for those of you for whom a book is a step too far but want to read, don’t worry, there are things you can do that will allow you to sleep and read.

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There are a seemingly unending list of genres for the would-be reader, as millennials, we are masters at using the digital world for finding what we want, use to this knowledge to find books that suit you.

·         Use sites such as Amazon and Goodreads to identify the genres that interest you.

·         Find internet sites that offer free or reduced price books.

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·         Look for sites such as WordPad and be among the first to read novels by new writers and               established ones.

·         Use bookseller sites and review blogs to identify trending authors and upcoming novels.

·         Review the books you read, online, especially the authors you like, if you do, there is always             a good chance you will get the opportunity to receive an ARC to read, (Advance Reader’s                 Copy) which allows you to get free the newest novel from an author in return for a review.

Offline, start a book swap with friends to keep costs down and an informal book club is a great way to get together with mates and engage yourself with some great debate.

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via images.unsplash.com

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Last Updated on September 10, 2018

Overcoming The Pain Of A Breakup: 3 Suggestions Based On Science

Overcoming The Pain Of A Breakup: 3 Suggestions Based On Science

We thought that the expression ‘broken heart’ was just a metaphor, but science is telling us that it is not: breakups and rejections do cause physical pain. When a group of psychologists asked research participants to look at images of their ex-partners who broke up with them, researchers found that the same brain areas that are activated by physical pain are also activated by looking at images of ex-partners. Looking at images of our ex is a painful experience, literally.[1].

Given that the effect of rejections and breakups is the same as the effect of physical pain, scientists have speculated on whether the practices that reduce physical pain could be used to reduce the emotional pain that follows from breakups and rejections. In a study on whether painkillers reduce the emotional pain caused by a breakup, researchers found that painkillers did help. Individuals who took painkillers were better able to deal with their breakup. Tamar Cohen wrote that “A simple dose of paracetamol could help ease the pain of a broken heart.”[2]

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Just like painkillers can be used to ease the pain of a broken heart, other practices that ease physical pain can also be used to ease the pain of rejections and breakups. Three of these scientifically validated practices are presented in this article.

Looking at images of loved ones

While images of ex-partners stimulate the pain neuro-circuitry in our brain, images of loved ones activate a different circuitry. Looking at images of people who care about us increases the release of oxytocin in our body. Oxytocin, or the “cuddle hormone,” is the hormone that our body relies on to induce in us a soothing feeling of tranquility, even when we are under high stress and pain.

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In fact, oxytocin was found to have a crucial role as a mother is giving birth to her baby. Despite the extreme pain that a mother has to endure during delivery, the high level of oxytocin secreted by her body transforms pain into pleasure. Mariem Melainine notes that, “Oxytocin levels are usually at their peak during delivery, which promotes a sense of euphoria in the mother and helps her develop a stronger bond with her baby.”[3]

Whenever you feel tempted to look at images of your ex-partner, log into your Facebook page and start browsing images of your loved ones. As Eva Ritvo, M.D. notes, “Facebook fools our brain into believing that loved ones surround us, which historically was essential to our survival. The human brain, because it evolved thousands of years before photography, fails on many levels to recognize the difference between pictures and people”[4]

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Exercise

Endorphins are neurotransmitters that reduce our perception of pain. When our body is high on endorphins, painful sensations are kept outside of conscious awareness. It was found that exercise causes endorphins to be secreted in the brain and as a result produce a feeling of power, as psychologist Alex Korb noted in his book: “Exercise causes your brain to release endorphins, neurotransmitters that act on your neurons like opiates (such as morphine or Vicodin) by sending a neural signal to reduce pain and provide anxiety relief.”[5] By inhibiting pain from being transmitted to our brain, exercise acts as a powerful antidote to the pain caused by rejections and breakups.

Meditation

Jon Kabat Zinn, a doctor who pioneered the use of mindfulness meditation therapy for patients with chronic pain, has argued that it is not pain itself that is harmful to our mental health, rather, it is the way we react to pain. When we react to pain with irritation, frustration, and self-pity, more pain is generated, and we enter a never ending spiral of painful thoughts and sensations.

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In order to disrupt the domino effect caused by reacting to pain with pain, Kabat Zinn and other proponents of mindfulness meditation therapy have suggested reacting to pain through nonjudgmental contemplation and acceptance. By practicing meditation on a daily basis and getting used to the habit of paying attention to the sensations generated by our body (including the painful ones and by observing these sensations nonjudgmentally and with compassion) our brain develops the habit of reacting to pain with grace and patience.

When you find yourself thinking about a recent breakup or a recent rejection, close your eyes and pay attention to the sensations produced by your body. Take deep breaths and as you are feeling the sensations produced by your body, distance yourself from them, and observe them without judgment and with compassion. If your brain starts wandering and gets distracted, gently bring back your compassionate nonjudgmental attention to your body. Try to do this exercise for one minute and gradually increase its duration.

With consistent practice, nonjudgmental acceptance will become our default reaction to breakups, rejections, and other disappointments that we experience in life. Every rejection and every breakup teaches us great lessons about relationships and about ourselves.

Featured photo credit: condesign via pixabay.com

Reference

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