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6 Commonly Overlooked Things to Check Before Relocating

6 Commonly Overlooked Things to Check Before Relocating

Whether for work, school, family or adventure, there are many reasons people decide to move to a new city. Humans live today with a desire and/or motive to relocate, not knowing how good they have it; for the majority of history, we lacked the technology for feasible travel.

With nothing more than our two feet to carry us, most folks were born, lived, worked and died all within a very small geographic area, perhaps no bigger than 20 miles. In short, take advantage of any and all opportunities to explore new places.

The major factors to consider when moving to a new city have already been covered in a previous Lifehack post – things like cost of living, crime and climate. We assume readers are already taking these elements of relocation into account. This article is concerned with additional factors most people overlook, especially first-time long distance movers.

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ISP Options

Few folks today can live without good internet access. Yet how many people think to check out the available home internet providers in a given city?

The ISP available in one region may not be operating in another. Furthermore, some ISPs are better than others, so checking before moving is vital for getting the best service possible upon arrival.

Transit

Is there a comprehensive mass transit system in the new city? How easy or hard is it to drive an automobile there? Again, we have a situation where every urban core is going to be a little different.

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Folks used to a city with a vast array of commuter trains, may move to a new place only to discover, the so-called mass transit system has fewer stops than a disposable camera. It pays to know in advance. Who wants to show up late on their first day of work in a new city?

Pet Laws

Roughly one out of three Americans own a pet. Animal ownership laws and regulations vary greatly from city to city, state to state. California, for example, has relatively tight animal welfare laws and registration requirements compared to neighboring states.

Nobody wants to move cross country only to discover their beloved pooch is an outlawed breed.

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Culture Clash

Local cultures vary wildly. This is true even without leaving a country, as the various cultures within the US would indicate. While part of moving somewhere new is appreciating the subtle albeit noticeable differences in ways of life, not every city is for everyone.

Doing some light research (usually not drifting far from Wikipedia) can reveal the prevailing cultural attitudes of a particular region and give clues as to whether or not it sounds like an enjoyable atmosphere from your point of view.

Corruption

Readers may think government corruption is ubiquitous and to some degree this is true. However, some governments are markedly more corrupt than others, especially certain cities.

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Considering “all politics is local ” the potential effect of corruption a city’s government can have on the average citizen is profound.  Therefore it’s imperative to look into whether or not a particular city is known for public corruption, or whether its elected officials have a reputation for playing on the level.

Signs of Success

In addition to levels of corruption, there are other signs of a city’s potential. Recent reporting conducted by a traveling pair of writers for The Atlantic, concludes that there are 11 signs a city will succeed. Among them, high frequency of private-public partnerships, clearly identifiable “local patriots” and close proximity to one or more research universities. If a city calling to you is lacking in most of these elements, it might be worth looking for another place to move.

Most of us know how to look into cost of living, crime, real estate prices and so forth, before moving to a new place. However, there are a few other things to consider before deciding to relocate.

Whether it’s the quality of the local internet access, transportation logistics, laws, culture or civic integrity, these aspects of another city are worth considering prior to making it your new home.

Featured photo credit: Wikipedia via upload.wikimedia.org

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Co-Founder, Siplikan Media Group

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Last Updated on January 21, 2020

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

Creating a vision for your life might seem like a frivolous, fantastical waste of time, but it’s not: creating a compelling vision of the life you want is actually one of the most effective strategies for achieving the life of your dreams. Perhaps the best way to look at the concept of a life vision is as a compass to help guide you to take the best actions and make the right choices that help propel you toward your best life.

your vision of where or who you want to be is the greatest asset you have

    Why You Need a Vision

    Experts and life success stories support the idea that with a vision in mind, you are more likely to succeed far beyond what you could otherwise achieve without a clear vision. Think of crafting your life vision as mapping a path to your personal and professional dreams. Life satisfaction and personal happiness are within reach. The harsh reality is that if you don’t develop your own vision, you’ll allow other people and circumstances to direct the course of your life.

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    How to Create Your Life Vision

    Don’t expect a clear and well-defined vision overnight—envisioning your life and determining the course you will follow requires time, and reflection. You need to cultivate vision and perspective, and you also need to apply logic and planning for the practical application of your vision. Your best vision blossoms from your dreams, hopes, and aspirations. It will resonate with your values and ideals, and will generate energy and enthusiasm to help strengthen your commitment to explore the possibilities of your life.

    What Do You Want?

    The question sounds deceptively simple, but it’s often the most difficult to answer. Allowing yourself to explore your deepest desires can be very frightening. You may also not think you have the time to consider something as fanciful as what you want out of life, but it’s important to remind yourself that a life of fulfillment does not usually happen by chance, but by design.

    It’s helpful to ask some thought-provoking questions to help you discover the possibilities of what you want out of life. Consider every aspect of your life, personal and professional, tangible and intangible. Contemplate all the important areas, family and friends, career and success, health and quality of life, spiritual connection and personal growth, and don’t forget about fun and enjoyment.

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    Some tips to guide you:

    • Remember to ask why you want certain things
    • Think about what you want, not on what you don’t want.
    • Give yourself permission to dream.
    • Be creative. Consider ideas that you never thought possible.
    • Focus on your wishes, not what others expect of you.

    Some questions to start your exploration:

    • What really matters to you in life? Not what should matter, what does matter.
    • What would you like to have more of in your life?
    • Set aside money for a moment; what do you want in your career?
    • What are your secret passions and dreams?
    • What would bring more joy and happiness into your life?
    • What do you want your relationships to be like?
    • What qualities would you like to develop?
    • What are your values? What issues do you care about?
    • What are your talents? What’s special about you?
    • What would you most like to accomplish?
    • What would legacy would you like to leave behind?

    It may be helpful to write your thoughts down in a journal or creative vision board if you’re the creative type. Add your own questions, and ask others what they want out of life. Relax and make this exercise fun. You may want to set your answers aside for a while and come back to them later to see if any have changed or if you have anything to add.

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    What Would Your Best Life Look Like?

    Describe your ideal life in detail. Allow yourself to dream and imagine, and create a vivid picture. If you can’t visualize a picture, focus on how your best life would feel. If you find it difficult to envision your life 20 or 30 years from now, start with five years—even a few years into the future will give you a place to start. What you see may surprise you. Set aside preconceived notions. This is your chance to dream and fantasize.

    A few prompts to get you started:

    • What will you have accomplished already?
    • How will you feel about yourself?
    • What kind of people are in your life? How do you feel about them?
    • What does your ideal day look like?
    • Where are you? Where do you live? Think specifics, what city, state, or country, type of community, house or an apartment, style and atmosphere.
    • What would you be doing?
    • Are you with another person, a group of people, or are you by yourself?
    • How are you dressed?
    • What’s your state of mind? Happy or sad? Contented or frustrated?
    • What does your physical body look like? How do you feel about that?
    • Does your best life make you smile and make your heart sing? If it doesn’t, dig deeper, dream bigger.

    It’s important to focus on the result, or at least a way-point in your life. Don’t think about the process for getting there yet—that’s the next stepGive yourself permission to revisit this vision every day, even if only for a few minutes. Keep your vision alive and in the front of your mind.

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    Plan Backwards

    It may sound counter-intuitive to plan backwards rather than forwards, but when you’re planning your life from the end result, it’s often more useful to consider the last step and work your way back to the first. This is actually a valuable and practical strategy for making your vision a reality.

    • What’s the last thing that would’ve had to happen to achieve your best life?
    • What’s the most important choice you would’ve had to make?
    • What would you have needed to learn along the way?
    • What important actions would you have had to take?
    • What beliefs would you have needed to change?
    • What habits or behaviors would you have had to cultivate?
    • What type of support would you have had to enlist?
    • How long will it have taken you to realize your best life?
    • What steps or milestones would you have needed to reach along the way?

    Now it’s time to think about your first step, and the next step after that. Ponder the gap between where you are now and where you want to be in the future. It may seem impossible, but it’s quite achievable if you take it step-by-step.

    It’s important to revisit this vision from time to time. Don’t be surprised if your answers to the questions, your technicolor vision, and the resulting plans change. That can actually be a very good thing; as you change in unforeseeable ways, the best life you envision will change as well. For now, it’s important to use the process, create your vision, and take the first step towards making that vision a reality.

    Featured photo credit: Matt Noble via unsplash.com

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