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Confessions of A Pharmacophobe: Why I’m Afraid of Drugs

Confessions of A Pharmacophobe: Why I’m Afraid of Drugs

What is Pharmacophobia?

As you may have guessed, pharmacophobia is the fear of drugs, but it actually extends much farther than that. Many folks, that experience some type of fear in relation to drugs, also experience a more targeted fear regarding pharmaceutical drugs as well as developing an addiction to them.

Of course, every person is different and can experience varied versions of pharmacophobia. Some may be afraid of medication, or hallucinogenic drugs, intravenous drugs, or even the common vaccinations specifically. In any case, very little information exists about this fear, which is why it is so important to bring this issue, and adjoining issues, into the light.

Why is pharmacophobia a problem?

Right about now you might be thinking “being afraid of drugs isn’t a bad thing” and you’d be partially correct. However, if we examine this phobia from a psychological perspective, it could potentially be harmful to someone’s life.

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Untreated mental illnesses, including fears, can grow into incapacitating obstacles in a person’s life. Often times, the illness starts as one small problem then evolves into a gargantuan issue that is impeding the affected individual’s ability to live a healthy life.

For example, someone with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) may have a fear of germs. This may start as a handwashing obsession that eventually begins to creep into other areas of that person’s life. Maybe they start becoming obsessive about germs in their house, on their clothes or shoes, where their food is cooked, etc. You can see where something as harmless as washing your hands can possibly stop someone from living a fulfilled and healthy life.

This can also affect those with other mental health conditions aside from their phobias. Someone may be suffering from pharmacophobia as well as anxiety, depression, or other common mental health problems. It may be quite difficult for someone with pharmacophobia to receive medical treatment for such a condition when they happen to be terrified of developing a dependency on their medication.

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Of course, many may go through their lives never needing treatment. Some pharmacophobes may remain in control over their fear and it may never develop into a larger issue. Yet, as is the case with millions of untreated mental health cases each year, many can result in constant stress, anxiety, and seclusion from a world where drugs are a part of our everyday lives.

How does someone develop a fear of drugs?

When I was about 8 years old, my mother developed a debilitating addiction to meth. She was trapped by this sickness, unable to escape for roughly 6 years. Eventually, she was arrested, sent to prison, and it was there that she committed to getting clean and sober.

I cannot speak for her and what she went through during those years, but I can speak for myself. Seeing my mother wither away before my very eyes was shocking to say the least. Watching someone so close to you, that you love so much, destroy their life and their body is simply horrifying. What I do know is, my mother was actually quite lucky to receive help when she did. Naturally, drug addiction in any form is risky, but extended use for months and even years is akin to playing a game of russian roulette.

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Meth is particularly addictive and harshly degenerative on the body. You may have seen photos of those who have been using for only a few short months that look like tenured drug users on their last leg.

As a result, I have been afraid of drugs for as long as I can remember. For me, pharmacophobia mainly exists within “recreational” drugs instead of medicinal drugs. However, I do have a fear of medication, specifically addictive pain, anxiety, and depression meds. I definitely don’t have an issue with taking things like aspirin, allergy medication, cold medicine, etc. I recognize that if I ever saw myself in a situation where I was in need of medical attention, I might need to take the medication in order to restore my health, but of course I would prefer not to.

Fear of What A Prescription Means

Aside from the possibility of traumatic experiences with drugs, some pharmacophobes also develop their fear due to a perceived lack of control. Not being in control of the mind or body can be a seriously frightening scenario for some.

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It’s easy to see why someone could develop a fear of drugs or addiction, given the current state prescription addiction in the United States. In a study done by the American Society of Addiction Medication, they reported over 47,055 drug related deaths in 2014 alone. Although 60% of these deaths were due to overdose by heroin or painkillers, the remaining 40% were due to the abuse of prescription medications, like highly accessible antidepressants or antianxiety medication.

What’s more, many others are afraid of the side affects that come along with medications. Possible blood clots, heart problems, liver failure, and even cancer can result from extended use of many prescription medications. These are hard facts to live with in a world where just about everything, even aspirin, has possible side effects listed on the bottle.

Lastly, societal stigmas and misinformation lead to shame amongst sufferers of mental illnesses and fears. Millions of Americans are so ashamed to admit their dependency on medication to help them live a peaceful life and heal over time. So, many choose to avoid this situation altogether due to a fear of failure. They become afraid of seeking help via medication because they believe this means they have failed as a human being.

Everyone deserves to be safe, healthy, and happy.

Understanding and controlling my pharmacophobia has been a journey for me and I realize that I may carry this fear for the rest of my life. Although, I too try to remember that asking for help does not result in my failure, quite the contrary actually. Seeking counseling or therapy is nothing to be ashamed of and should be used as a constant resource for those who feel that their mental health is negatively affecting their quality of life or the lives of those around them.

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Last Updated on October 29, 2018

What Causes Brain Fog? (7 Things You Can Do to Prevent and Stop It)

What Causes Brain Fog? (7 Things You Can Do to Prevent and Stop It)

Brain fog is more of a symptom than a medical condition itself, but this doesn’t mean it should be ignored. Brain fog is a cognitive dysfunction, which can lead to memory problems, lack of mental clarity and an inability to focus.

Many often excuse brain fog for a bad day, or get so used to it that they ignore it. Unfortunately, when brain fog is ignored it ends up interfering with work and school. The reason many ignore it is because they aren’t fully aware of what causes it and how to deal with it.

It’s important to remember that if your brain doesn’t function fully — nothing else in your life will. Most people have days where they can’t seem to concentrate or forget where they put their keys.

It’s very normal to have days where you can’t think clearly, but if you’re experiencing these things on a daily basis, then you’re probably dealing with brain fog for a specific reason.

So what causes brain fog? It can be caused by a string of things, so we’ve made a list things that causes brain fog and how to prevent it and how to stop it.

1. Stress

It’s no surprise that we’ll find stress at the top of the list. Most people are aware of the dangers of stress. It can increase blood pressure, trigger depression and make us sick as it weakens our immune system.

Another symptom is mental fatigue. When you’re stressed your brain can’t function at its best. It gets harder to think and focus, which makes you stress even more.

Stress can be prevented by following some simple steps. If you’re feeling stressed you should avoid caffeine, alcohol and nicotine — even though it may feel like it helps in the moment. Two other important steps are to indulge in more physical activities and to talk to someone about it.

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Besides that, you can consider keeping a stress diary, try relaxation techniques like mediation, getting more sleep and maybe a new approach to time management.

2. Diet

Most people know that the right or wrong diet can make them gain or loss weight, but not enough people think about the big impact a specific diet can have on one’s health even if it might be healthy.

One of the most common vitamin deficiencies is vitamin B12 deficiency and especially vegans can be get hid by brain fog, because their diet often lacks the vitamin B-12. The vitamin B12 deficiency can lead to mental and neurological disorders.

The scary thing is that almost 40 % of adults are estimated to lack B12 in their diet. B12 is found in animal products, which is why many vegans are in B12 deficiency, but this doesn’t mean that people need animal products to prevent the B12 deficiency. B12 can be taken as a supplement, which will make the problem go away.

Another vital vitamin that can cause brain fog is vitamin D. More than 1 billion people worldwide don’t have enough vitamin D in their diet. Alongside B12 and vitamin D is omega-3, which because of its fatty acids helps the brain function and concentrate. Luckily, both vitamin D and omega-3 can be taken as supplements.

Then there’s of course also the obvious unhealthy foods like sugar. Refined carbohydrates like sugar will send your blood sugar levels up, and then send you right back down. This will lead to brain fog, because your brain uses glucose as its main source of fuel and once you start playing around with your brain — it gets confused.

Besides being hit by brain fog, you’ll also experience tiredness, mood swings and mental confusion. So, if you want to have clear mind, then stay away from sugar.

Sometimes the same type of diet can be right for some and wrong for others. If you’re experiencing brain fog it’s a good idea to seek out your doctor or a nutritionist. They can take some tests and help you figure out which type of diet works best for your health, or find out if you’re lacking something specific in your diet.

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3. Allergies

If you have food allergies, or are simply a bit sensitive to specific foods, then eating those foods can lead to brain fog. Look out for dairy, peanuts and aspartame that are known to have a bad effect on the brain.

Most people get their calories from corn, soy and wheat — and big surprise — these foods are some of the most common foods people are allergic to. If you’re in doubt, then you can look up food allergies[1] and find some of the most common symptoms.

If you’re unsure about being allergic or sensitive, then you can start out by cutting out a specific food from your diet for a week or two. If the brain fog disappears, then you’re most likely allergic or sensitive to this food. The symptoms will usually go away after a week or two once you remove the trigger food from the diet.

If you still unsure, then you should seek out the help of your doctor.

4. Lack of sleep

All of us know we need sleep to function, but it’s different for everybody how much sleep they need. A few people can actually function on as little as 3-4 hours of sleep every night, but these people are very, very rare.

Most people need 8 to 9 hours of sleep. If you don’t get the sleep you need, then this will interfere with your brain and you may experience brain fog.

Instead of skipping a few hours of sleep to get ahead of things you need to do, you’ll end up taking away productive hours from your day, because you won’t be able to concentrate and your thoughts will be cloudy.

Many people have trouble sleeping but you can help improve your sleep by a following a few simple steps.

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There is the 4-7-8 Breathing Exercise, which is a technique that regulates your breath and helps you fall asleep faster. Another well-known technique is to avoid bright lights before you go to sleep.

A lot of us are guilty of falling asleep with the TV on or with our phone right by us, but the blue lights from these screens suppresses the production of melatonin in our bodies, which actually makes us stay awake longer instead. If you’re having trouble going to sleep without doing something before you close your eyes, then try taking up reading instead.

If you want to feel more energized throughout the day, start doing this.

5. Hormonal changes

Brain fog can be triggered by hormonal changes. Whenever your levels of progesterone and estrogen increases, you may experience short-term cognitive impairment and your memory can get bad.

If you’re pregnant or going through menopause, then you shouldn’t worry too much if your mind suddenly starts to get a bit cloudy. Focus on keeping a good diet, getting enough of sleep and the brain fog should pass once you’re back to normal.

6. Medication

If you’re on some medication, then it’s very normal to start experiencing some brain fog.

You may start to forget things that you used to be able to remember, or you get easily confused. Maybe you can’t concentrate the same way that you used to. All of these things can be very scary, but you shouldn’t worry too much about it.

Brain fog is a very normal side effect of drugs, but by lowering your dosage or switching over to another drug; the side effect can’t often be improved and maybe even completely removed.

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7. Medical condition

Brain fog can often be a symptom of a medical condition. Medical conditions that include inflammation, fatigue, changes in blood glucose level are known to cause brain fog.

Conditions like chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, anemia, depression, diabetes, migraines, hypothyroidism, Sjögren syndrome, Alzheimer’s disease, Lupus and dehydration can all cause brain fog.[2]

The bottom line

If you haven’t been diagnosed, then never start browsing around Google for the conditions and the symptoms. Once you start looking for it; it’s very easy to (wrongfully) self-diagnose.

Take a step back, put away the laptop and relax. If you’re worried about being sick, then always check in with your doctor and take it from there.

Remember, the list of things that can cause brain fog is long and it can be something as simple as the wrong diet or not enough sleep.

Featured photo credit: Asdrubal luna via unsplash.com

Reference

[1]Food Allergy: Common Allergens
[2]HealthLine: 6 Possible Causes of Brain Fog

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