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5 New Mom Apps That Saved My Sanity

5 New Mom Apps That Saved My Sanity

Being a new mom is stressful, especially if you’re doing it all for the first time. You constantly worry if you’re doing it right. I’ll admit it, I Googled EVERYTHING for the first six months. My smartphone became my best friend. It’s easy (with practice) to hold a brand new baby and a phone at the same time. Within the first month of my maternal journey I rounded up a posse of mom apps to keep me from losing my mind.

My Favorite Mom Apps

Which Breast

I am lucky to be a breastfeeding mom, but the cluster-feeding induced sleep deprivation had me quickly confused as to which breast I’d last used. I was even too tired to use a safety pin in my bra on the last side I’d used, a trick recommended by my mother. In my first few days of motherhood I tried out a variety of breastfeeding tracker apps, and I like this one the most. It’s straightforward and really easy to use. I used it far longer than I probably needed to, but it kept me feeling on track.

It’s free, but it’s only on Android. The good news is there are similar mom apps for iOS. If you bottle feed, there’s an app for that too.

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mydlink Baby Camera Monitor

Because I only let go of my phone to change diapers, and on the odd occasion when I would shower, I wanted a camera with a video baby monitor app, not a separate screen. You can watch your baby sleep from anywhere, as long as you have an Internet connection. Like on date night when grandma is watching the baby, but you miss them so much, even though you really needed a break. Yeah.

This app is free, but you do have to buy the camera. I’ll be honest, I chose it because it was on sale, but I have never had a problem with it. It may be the second best thing to happen to me. This mom app is available for both Android and iOS.

Relax and Sleep

When you spend a lot of time on the Internet searching “why won’t my baby sleep?”, you often get the answer “use white noise”. Again, I went through a lot of white noise apps and I just liked this one the best. With this app you can become a white noise DJ, mixing different levels of wolf song and thunderstorm, or ocean and campfire (my daughter’s favorite). My cousin’s son will only chill out for vacuum sounds. And the best part? It comes with you wherever you go.

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This mom app essential is free, but only for Android. (Sorry guys, I’m a Galaxy gal). However, iOS has some great free apps too.

The Wonder Weeks

If you are worried about the dreaded four-month sleep regression, The Wonder Weeks is for you. This app was recommended to me by a mom with experience and it is fantastic. It warns you about impending fussy periods and keeps you up-to-date on mental milestones. Having this mom app at my fingertips has taught me a valuable lesson that all moms need to learn: your baby isn’t crying because it hates you and you are terrible, it’s just going through a phase. Wonderfully, this mom app gives you tips on how to help your babe through these leaps.

This is the only app I have ever paid for, no lie. My only regret is that I didn’t get it sooner. It is available for both Android and iOS.

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Netflix

This may seem like a cop-out when it comes to mom apps, but I spent a lot of time with Netflix in the first few months of motherhood. Three A.M. fussy feedings are maybe not the ideal time to read ‘The Girl on the Train’, but they are perfect for bingeing all seven seasons of Parks and Recreation. Which I did on my phone, while nursing in a rocking chair.

Bonus: when your baby is a bit older, you can put them in their bouncy chair in front of BBC nature documentaries, and know that you are doing something good for their brain. And then that tiny infant will be 13 months old and you will pass them your phone with Puffin Rock on it and pray they stay quiet for six minutes.

The Netflix app is available for free on Android and iOS, though you do have to pay for the subscription.

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This article is entirely my own opinion, and I have not been paid by any of these companies to share their products. I hope that sharing my lifehack with mom-kind will ease someone else’s transition in to motherhood, and save their sanity too.

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Last Updated on August 29, 2018

5 Killer Online Journal Tools That Make Journaling Easier and More Fun

5 Killer Online Journal Tools That Make Journaling Easier and More Fun

Journaling is one of the most useful personal development tools around. Not only does it help us process emotions and experiences, work through internal conflicts and improve our self-awareness, it also provides us with a way to keep a day-to-day record of our lives. Traditionally an activity limited to pen and paper, the expansion of consumer technology has enabled journaling to go digital.

Saving your journaling entries online enables you to access them from anywhere, without having to carry a notebook and pen around, and provides you with digital features, like tagging and search functions.

Here are a list of five online journaling tools you can use to bring your practice into the modern age:

1. 750words

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750 words

    750words is a free online journaling tool created by Buster Benson. The site is based on the idea of “Morning Pages”; a journaling tool Julia Cameron suggests in her creativity course The Artist’s Way. Cameron advises aspiring creatives to start each morning with three pages of stream-of-consciousness writing to clear away the mental clutter, leaving you with a clearer mind to face the day.

    750 words is the three-page digital equivalent (assuming the average person writes 250 words per page) and lets you store all your journaling online. Each morning, you’ll receive a prompt asking you to write your 750 words, and the site keeps track of various statistics associated with your entries. The site uses a Regressive Imagery Dictionary to calculate the emotional content from your posts and provides feedback on features like your mood, and most commonly used words.

    750 words is simple to set up and is ideal for anyone who finds it challenging to maintain a consistent journaling practice. The site uses a number of incentives to motivate users, including animal badges awarded to journalers who complete a certain number of days in a row, leader boards, and opt-in monthly challenges.

    2. Ohlife

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    ohlife

      Ohlife is designed to make online journaling as easy as possible. Once you’ve signed up for your free account, the website will send you an email each day asking “How did your day go?” Simply reply to the email with as much or as little detail as you like, and your response will be stored on your account, ready to view next time you log in.

      Ohlife’s appeal lies in its simplicity: no stats, no social sharing, no complicated organisational systems—the site is designed to provide you with a private, online space. Simply respond to the email each day (or skip the days you’re busy) and Ohlife will do the rest.

      3. Oneword

      oneword

        OneWord is a fun online tool that provides you with a single word as a prompt and gives you sixty seconds to write about it. The concept’s aim is to help writers learn how to flow, and the prompts range from the everyday mundane to the profound.

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        Oneword is not a private journaling tool: if you sign up, your answers will be published on the site’s daily blog, which contains a stream of users’ answers, and might be used by Oneword in the future. If you’d rather keep your answers to yourself, you can still use the tool for fun without giving out any personal details.

        4. Penzu

          Penzu is a journaling tool that allows you to store your journaling notes online. The service also offers mobile apps for iOS, Android and Blackberry, so you can journal on the go and save your notes to your account. The basic service is free, however you can upgrade to Penzu Pro and get access to additional features, including military-grade encryption and the ability to save and sync data through your mobile, for $19 per year.

          With either version of Penzu, you can insert pictures, and add tags and comments to entries, as well as search for older entries. You can set your posts to be private and viewable by you only, or share them with others.

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          5. Evernote

          Evernote isn’t a purpose-built journaling tool, however its features make it perfect for keeping your journaling notes in one safe place. With the ability to keep separate “notebooks”, tag your entries, include pictures, audio and web clipping, Evernote will appeal to journalers who want to include more formats than just text in their entries.

          Available online within a web browser, and as a stand-alone desktop app, the service also comes with a series of mobile apps covering almost every device available. These allow you to make notes on the go and sync between the mobile and browser versions of the app.

          For additional features, including text recognition and the ability to collaborate on Notebooks, you can upgrade to Evernote’s premium service, which costs $5 per month.

          Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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