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5 New Mom Apps That Saved My Sanity

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5 New Mom Apps That Saved My Sanity

Being a new mom is stressful, especially if you’re doing it all for the first time. You constantly worry if you’re doing it right. I’ll admit it, I Googled EVERYTHING for the first six months. My smartphone became my best friend. It’s easy (with practice) to hold a brand new baby and a phone at the same time. Within the first month of my maternal journey I rounded up a posse of mom apps to keep me from losing my mind.

My Favorite Mom Apps

Which Breast

I am lucky to be a breastfeeding mom, but the cluster-feeding induced sleep deprivation had me quickly confused as to which breast I’d last used. I was even too tired to use a safety pin in my bra on the last side I’d used, a trick recommended by my mother. In my first few days of motherhood I tried out a variety of breastfeeding tracker apps, and I like this one the most. It’s straightforward and really easy to use. I used it far longer than I probably needed to, but it kept me feeling on track.

It’s free, but it’s only on Android. The good news is there are similar mom apps for iOS. If you bottle feed, there’s an app for that too.

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mydlink Baby Camera Monitor

Because I only let go of my phone to change diapers, and on the odd occasion when I would shower, I wanted a camera with a video baby monitor app, not a separate screen. You can watch your baby sleep from anywhere, as long as you have an Internet connection. Like on date night when grandma is watching the baby, but you miss them so much, even though you really needed a break. Yeah.

This app is free, but you do have to buy the camera. I’ll be honest, I chose it because it was on sale, but I have never had a problem with it. It may be the second best thing to happen to me. This mom app is available for both Android and iOS.

Relax and Sleep

When you spend a lot of time on the Internet searching “why won’t my baby sleep?”, you often get the answer “use white noise”. Again, I went through a lot of white noise apps and I just liked this one the best. With this app you can become a white noise DJ, mixing different levels of wolf song and thunderstorm, or ocean and campfire (my daughter’s favorite). My cousin’s son will only chill out for vacuum sounds. And the best part? It comes with you wherever you go.

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This mom app essential is free, but only for Android. (Sorry guys, I’m a Galaxy gal). However, iOS has some great free apps too.

The Wonder Weeks

If you are worried about the dreaded four-month sleep regression, The Wonder Weeks is for you. This app was recommended to me by a mom with experience and it is fantastic. It warns you about impending fussy periods and keeps you up-to-date on mental milestones. Having this mom app at my fingertips has taught me a valuable lesson that all moms need to learn: your baby isn’t crying because it hates you and you are terrible, it’s just going through a phase. Wonderfully, this mom app gives you tips on how to help your babe through these leaps.

This is the only app I have ever paid for, no lie. My only regret is that I didn’t get it sooner. It is available for both Android and iOS.

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Netflix

This may seem like a cop-out when it comes to mom apps, but I spent a lot of time with Netflix in the first few months of motherhood. Three A.M. fussy feedings are maybe not the ideal time to read ‘The Girl on the Train’, but they are perfect for bingeing all seven seasons of Parks and Recreation. Which I did on my phone, while nursing in a rocking chair.

Bonus: when your baby is a bit older, you can put them in their bouncy chair in front of BBC nature documentaries, and know that you are doing something good for their brain. And then that tiny infant will be 13 months old and you will pass them your phone with Puffin Rock on it and pray they stay quiet for six minutes.

The Netflix app is available for free on Android and iOS, though you do have to pay for the subscription.

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This article is entirely my own opinion, and I have not been paid by any of these companies to share their products. I hope that sharing my lifehack with mom-kind will ease someone else’s transition in to motherhood, and save their sanity too.

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Last Updated on November 25, 2021

How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

    What Does Private Browsing Do?

    When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

    For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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    The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

    The Terminal Archive

    While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

    Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

    dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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    Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

    Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

    However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

    Clearing Your Tracks

    Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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    dscacheutil -flushcache

    As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

    Other Browsers and Private Browsing

    Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

    If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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    As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

    Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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