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6 Cloud-Based Tools To Help You Build A Web App With Ease

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6 Cloud-Based Tools To Help You Build A Web App With Ease

In just a relatively short amount of time, building mobile apps has transformed from a process that included lots of knowledge in developing into something that almost anyone can do. Cloud-based tools are quickly becoming the norm for app developers, and these are some of the highest recommended tools, each one being ideal for certain developers.

1. Conduit

This is possibly the most simple mobile application builder that can be found. The company boasts that there is no coding necessary to build, and setting up designs is quick and easy. Apps can be developed for both iOS and Android in just a matter of minutes. The tool comes with a variety of components like social feed, events, RSS, notifications, e-commerce and more. The builder will even submit your app to app stores on your behalf. This is the perfect solution for someone that is not very technical.

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2. Softarex

When taking action to build a web application, Softarex eases many aspects associated with app development. This tool will allow for a centralized location of backup for all data, which is protected by high security. Communication among team members becomes easier, and the software can be accessed from multiple locations. Softarex provides continued maintenance and support, system administration, and even software development making it the perfect solution for publishing and advertisement, healthcare, education, and communications. These users can enjoy a reduction of nagging software updates like those for traditional programs, and a decreased cost of infrastructure on users’ computers.

3. Appery.io

Formerly called Tiggzi, this platform can be described as a “cloud-based HTML5, hybrid mobile and jQuery mobile app builder”. It is quite easy to use, and it builds HTML5 applications that are cross-platform, using jQuery mobile. It is supported by Android, iOS, and Windows phones, so it is accessible to everyone. Because the builder runs on the cloud, there is nothing that users have to install or download, so it is quite easy to build the app. It has been described as using a powerful drag-and-drop tool as a visual builder.

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The company says that a mobile user interface is not useful without data, so the app connect to any REST API that can be used easily in the app. Developers can even test the REST API prior to using it on the page and promptly define the service response structure. This makes trying a new service very quick and easy.

4. Codiqa

For those who are more of a designer and less of a programmer, Codiqa is made for them. It is not focused on developers and has a drag-and-drop interface for fast and easy building of mobile prototypes. It even has a preview mode to test the prototypes. The program builds the app with 100% HTML5 components as a cloud-based platform. The basic thing to know about Codiqa is that users can take their idea, make it into a prototype, and be left with useable, real code. Unlike many web app developers, there will be no need to code it all over again after the prototype.

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5. Knack

Knack is a great way to build a simple web app. The do-it-yourself tool is focused on building apps that work with your data. This platform allows for the ease of including functions like search, data display, and custom forms. The company is quite new, but it has attracted a dedicated customer base including a variety of startups that use the platform to manage and track fleet assets, job dispatching, taxes, and truck mileage. There is also a firm that uses the platform to create custom reports and pivot table searches. Knack provides a way to find and sort and explore and share data.

6. Kinvey

Kinvey could easily be the most technical of all cloud-based app development platforms. If you are familiar with programming, it can be the most powerful tool at your fingertips. The company has described itself as “taking a hassle out of building and operating mobile backends”. It will eliminate risk by reducing backend development from months to just hours, allowing the prototype faster with much less effort. Users also do not have to pay for the platform unless their app is successful. Large companies such as Johnson & Johnson and Fetchnotes have built their apps on this platform. For those who are more familiar with developing apps, it is worth a closer look.

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Last Updated on November 25, 2021

How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

    What Does Private Browsing Do?

    When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

    For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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    The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

    The Terminal Archive

    While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

    Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

    dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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    Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

    Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

    However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

    Clearing Your Tracks

    Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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    dscacheutil -flushcache

    As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

    Other Browsers and Private Browsing

    Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

    If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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    As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

    Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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