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6 Cloud-Based Tools To Help You Build A Web App With Ease

6 Cloud-Based Tools To Help You Build A Web App With Ease

In just a relatively short amount of time, building mobile apps has transformed from a process that included lots of knowledge in developing into something that almost anyone can do. Cloud-based tools are quickly becoming the norm for app developers, and these are some of the highest recommended tools, each one being ideal for certain developers.

1. Conduit

This is possibly the most simple mobile application builder that can be found. The company boasts that there is no coding necessary to build, and setting up designs is quick and easy. Apps can be developed for both iOS and Android in just a matter of minutes. The tool comes with a variety of components like social feed, events, RSS, notifications, e-commerce and more. The builder will even submit your app to app stores on your behalf. This is the perfect solution for someone that is not very technical.

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2. Softarex

When taking action to build a web application, Softarex eases many aspects associated with app development. This tool will allow for a centralized location of backup for all data, which is protected by high security. Communication among team members becomes easier, and the software can be accessed from multiple locations. Softarex provides continued maintenance and support, system administration, and even software development making it the perfect solution for publishing and advertisement, healthcare, education, and communications. These users can enjoy a reduction of nagging software updates like those for traditional programs, and a decreased cost of infrastructure on users’ computers.

3. Appery.io

Formerly called Tiggzi, this platform can be described as a “cloud-based HTML5, hybrid mobile and jQuery mobile app builder”. It is quite easy to use, and it builds HTML5 applications that are cross-platform, using jQuery mobile. It is supported by Android, iOS, and Windows phones, so it is accessible to everyone. Because the builder runs on the cloud, there is nothing that users have to install or download, so it is quite easy to build the app. It has been described as using a powerful drag-and-drop tool as a visual builder.

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The company says that a mobile user interface is not useful without data, so the app connect to any REST API that can be used easily in the app. Developers can even test the REST API prior to using it on the page and promptly define the service response structure. This makes trying a new service very quick and easy.

4. Codiqa

For those who are more of a designer and less of a programmer, Codiqa is made for them. It is not focused on developers and has a drag-and-drop interface for fast and easy building of mobile prototypes. It even has a preview mode to test the prototypes. The program builds the app with 100% HTML5 components as a cloud-based platform. The basic thing to know about Codiqa is that users can take their idea, make it into a prototype, and be left with useable, real code. Unlike many web app developers, there will be no need to code it all over again after the prototype.

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5. Knack

Knack is a great way to build a simple web app. The do-it-yourself tool is focused on building apps that work with your data. This platform allows for the ease of including functions like search, data display, and custom forms. The company is quite new, but it has attracted a dedicated customer base including a variety of startups that use the platform to manage and track fleet assets, job dispatching, taxes, and truck mileage. There is also a firm that uses the platform to create custom reports and pivot table searches. Knack provides a way to find and sort and explore and share data.

6. Kinvey

Kinvey could easily be the most technical of all cloud-based app development platforms. If you are familiar with programming, it can be the most powerful tool at your fingertips. The company has described itself as “taking a hassle out of building and operating mobile backends”. It will eliminate risk by reducing backend development from months to just hours, allowing the prototype faster with much less effort. Users also do not have to pay for the platform unless their app is successful. Large companies such as Johnson & Johnson and Fetchnotes have built their apps on this platform. For those who are more familiar with developing apps, it is worth a closer look.

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Last Updated on February 15, 2019

7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

Joe’s Goals

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    Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

    Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

    Daytum

      Daytum

      is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

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      Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

      Excel or Numbers

        If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

        What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

        Evernote

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          I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

          Evernote is free with a premium version available.

          Access or Bento

            If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

            Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

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            You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

            Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

            All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

            Conclusion

            I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

            What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

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