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5 Entry-Level DSLR Cameras for Startup Photographers

5 Entry-Level DSLR Cameras for Startup Photographers

Are you ready to take your photography to the next step and to look for entry-level DSLR cameras? In contrast to the compact cameras, DSLR is a big step up when it comes to image quality. It offers the user a far more manual control and provides the full opportunity to change the lenses to fulfill the demands of individual projects. You can also consider buying a mirrorless camera if you’re an amateur photographer, but you won’t be able to find an electronic viewfinder with 4k consumer camera at the same price as a DSLR. So, it’s all up to you now!

1. Nikon D3300

Let’s start with the Nikon’s D3300 DSLR camera. It features 24.2-megapixel sensor with the least image noise, which is ISO3200; it produces better results at high sensor sensitivities. Similar to the other Nikon’s pricey DSLR’s, it comes with a non-anti-aliasing filter that helps in maximizing the sharpness of the images. It’s an easy-to-use camera with the smart guidance mode – which is a helpful learning tool to understand the significant camera features along with the collapsible 18 to 55mm lens kit. I know, it’s a shame that you won’t get a touchscreen in this model and Wifi connectivity feature. However, you will get a Wi-Fi adapter.

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2. Canon EOS 750D

Now comes the Canon 750D, which is the latest addition to the EOS category. It’s a pricey camera, but the features it contains is worth it. It has a 24.2 MP sensor that will produce stunning, high-quality images with significantly lower noise with higher ISO sensitivity. The canon’s 750D also comes with an improved auto-focus feature and the exposure metering systems, which were lacking in the Canon’s 700D model. 750D also comes with the NFC pairing and Wi-Fi feature. Even though it looks the same as its predecessor, meaning you’ll enjoy the touch screen.

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3. Nikon D5500

When it comes to the Nikon D5500, it’s the direct competitor of the 750D. Nikon’s 3000 range of cameras is specially designed for the price-conscious amateur photographers and on the other hand, D5000 range is for those who wants to play with creativity. Nikon D5500 has been the first ever in the entire series to be launched with the touch screen feature along with the Wi-Fi feature. But, still, it lacks the GPS facility and also, its autofocus speed is too low. Its 24.2 MP non-anti-aliasing sensor is good and delivers excellent and clear photos.

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4. Canon EOS 760D

Canon launched two versions of the EOS 700D, which is 750D and the 760D; which can be confusing. In fact, 750D and the 760D are almost identical internally. But, when it comes to the external controls, there’s a significant difference, particularly the inclusion of an LCD and a rear thumb wheel. These advanced features are only present in the professional models. If you’re an amateur photographer, then Canon EOS 750D is the best choice to go for.

5. Nikon D5300

Nikon’s D5300 was launched almost a year before the D5500 with some technical replacements. However, D5300 is a modern day camera as compared to the 700D. Both have the same 24.2-megapixel sensor with the same max ISO25600 image sensitiveness as for the D5500; whereas the replaced features of D5300 were autofocus (39-point) and the Expeed Four image processor. Although the D5300 doesn’t contain touch screen controls, you will get the GPS function. Moreover, D5500 gives more battery time than the D5300, but still, it’s a smarter purchase than the Canon 750D.

If you really are into photography, then you should invest in a DSLR camera that is good enough for amateurs. There are 5 models that are advisable for you: Nikon D3300, Canon EOS 750D, Nikon D5500, Canon EOS 760D and Nikon D5300. These cameras are user-friendly and come with a guidance mode to help you shoot top quality images despite being a beginner.

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Last Updated on May 15, 2019

How to Tap Into the Power of Positivity

How to Tap Into the Power of Positivity

As it appears, the human mind is not capable of not thinking, at least on the subconscious level. Our mind is always occupied by thoughts, whether we want to or not, and they influence our every action.

“Happiness cannot come from without, it comes from within.” – Helen Keller

When we are still children, our thoughts seem to be purely positive. Have you ever been around a 4-year old who doesn’t like a painting he or she drew? I haven’t. Instead, I see glee, exciting and pride in children’s eyes. But as the years go by, we clutter our mind with doubts, fears and self-deprecating thoughts.

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Just imagine then how much we limit ourselves in every aspect of our lives if we give negative thoughts too much power! We’ll never go after that job we’ve always wanted because our nay-saying thoughts make us doubt our abilities. We’ll never ask that person we like out on a date because we always think we’re not good enough.

We’ll never risk quitting our job in order to pursue the life and the work of our dreams because we can’t get over our mental barrier that insists we’re too weak, too unimportant and too dumb. We’ll never lose those pounds that risk our health because we believe we’re not capable of pushing our limits. We’ll never be able to fully see our inner potential because we simply don’t dare to question the voices in our head.

But enough is enough! It’s time to stop these limiting beliefs and come to a place of sanity, love and excitement about life, work and ourselves.

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So…how exactly are we to achieve that?

It’s not as hard as it may seem; you just have to practice, practice, practice. Here are a few ideas on how you can get started.

1. Learn to substitute every negative thought with a positive one.

Every time a negative thought crawls into your mind, replace it with a positive thought. It’s just like someone writes a phrase you don’t like on a blackboard and then you get up, erase it and write something much more to your liking.

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2. See the positive side of every situation, even when you are surrounded by pure negativity.

This one is a bit harder to put into practice, which does not mean it’s impossible.

You can find positivity in everything by mentally holding on to something positive, whether this be family, friends, your faith, nature, someone’s sparkling eyes or whatever other glimmer of beauty. If you seek it, you will find it.

3. At least once a day, take a moment and think of 5 things you are grateful for.

This will lighten your mood and give you some perspective of what is really important in life and how many blessings surround you already.

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4. Change the mental images you allow to enter your mind.

How you see yourself and your surroundings make a huge difference to your thinking. It is like watching a DVD that saddens and frustrates you, completely pulling you down. Eject that old DVD, throw it away and insert a new, better, more hopeful one instead.

So, instead of dwelling on dark, negative thoughts, consciously build and focus on positive, light and colorful images, thoughts and situations in your mind a few times a day.

If you are persistent and keep on working on yourself, your mind will automatically reject its negative thoughts and welcome the positive ones.

And remember: You are (or will become) what you think you are. This is reason enough to be proactive about whatever is going on in your head.

Featured photo credit: Kyaw Tun via unsplash.com

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