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Sensory Deprivation Therapy: The Key to Relaxing Completely

Sensory Deprivation Therapy: The Key to Relaxing Completely

The sensory deprivation therapy has come to know by many names over the years. It is known as an isolation tank or chamber originally called the sensory deprivation tank (a.k.a sensory attenuation tank, flotation tank, etc.). It is a large enclosed bathtub filled with a temperature regulated salt water isolating the occupant from various sensory inputs.

A Dip in the Sensory Deprivation Tank

Increasingly, this treatment has become an essential practice to have work-life balance. It is expected that sensory deprivation tanks will take off and are a promise for a total-body rehabilitation session.

These 1,000-plus pounds tanks were developed by John C. Lilly back in the 1950s. He was an American physician, neuroscientist, psychoanalyst, inventor, etc. So how does it exactly work? A person is immersed in 25 cm deep of super-saturated Epsom salt solution. The experience or sensation is like floating effortlessly.

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This buoyancy effect is created by the Epsom salt, which comes in contact with the body and removes the effects of gravity in the body. The Epsom salt solution is utilised to give the water enough density to float with little to no effort. It helps replenish a common malnourishment from a lack of magnesium, and there are no known risks of having an overloading effect.

Below are the conditions that are improved by floating:

  • Muscular pain
  • Stress relief
  • Chronic pain
  • High blood pressure
  • Migraine headache
  • Depression
  • Pre-menstrual tension
  • Rheumatism

A typical therapy session inside a flotation tank ranges from 60 to 120 minutes in duration. Prices will vary by location along with different membership packages.

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The Basics of a Floating Experience

Now that we know what the relaxation of floating consists of we can look at how this entire process works. The following infographic highlights a 10-step process for a typical appointment:

  1. Arrive and check in
  2. Cover the frequently asked questions
  3. Then you shower
  4. Put in earplugs
  5. Step into the float tank
  6. Settle into the tank
  7. 45 minutes floating
  8. Turn on the lights
  9. Shower
  10. Enjoy the rest of your day

This sensory deprivation therapy resets the body’s hormonal and metabolic balance. In addition, it leads to strengthening resistance from the effects of stress-related factors, a strenuous activity or injury. In other words, it is like having an out-of-body experience (OOBE) or feel like floating in out space.

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The Floatation Tank [Infographic]

    Precautions & Side Effects

    This treatment gets positive reviews and overall considered a great remedy. In spite of all of the great recommendations behind this therapeutic treatment, it is advised for some groups of people to check beforehand if their doctor approves of it. Specifically, those who suffer from high blood pressure, heart disease or a kidney condition should consult with a medical professional.

    A prolonged period of time exposed to the Epsom salt solution may cause diarrhoea and dry skin. Aside from these recommendations floatation rest, in general, has no known severe side effects, in accordance to Encyclopedia.com.

    Conclusion:

    Sensory deprivation therapy will continue to experience interest. It is not surprising individuals are seeking this therapeutic treatment to relieve daily pressures or common stressors that people encounter every day.

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    This sensory deprivation therapy or restricted environmental stimulation therapy (REST) brings about an extremely deep level of relaxation, which is a great way to reduce high levels of stress. There are significant mental and physical health benefits produced by using these techniques.

    In today’s high paced world, it is importance to prevent getting burned out. This comes as no surprise that people are shifting their daily routines. This means exercising more, eating healthier foods and trying out alternative therapies like sensory deprivation. Coming out of these isolation tanks is like resetting our bodies and feeling completely renewed.

    Featured photo credit: By S Pisharam via Flickr via flickr.com

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    Anthony Carranza

    Multilingual writer and journalist covering all things technology and productivity.

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    Last Updated on March 13, 2019

    How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

    How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

    Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

    You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

    Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

    1. Work on the small tasks.

    When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

    Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

    2. Take a break from your work desk.

    Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

    Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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    3. Upgrade yourself

    Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

    The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

    4. Talk to a friend.

    Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

    Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

    5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

    If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

    Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

    Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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    6. Paint a vision to work towards.

    If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

    Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

    Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

    7. Read a book (or blog).

    The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

    Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

    Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

    8. Have a quick nap.

    If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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    9. Remember why you are doing this.

    Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

    What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

    10. Find some competition.

    Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

    Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

    11. Go exercise.

    Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

    Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

    As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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    Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

    12. Take a good break.

    Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

    Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

    Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

    Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

    More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

    Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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