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Babyproofing Your Home 101: Get Safe And Secure

Babyproofing Your Home 101: Get Safe And Secure

The gift and miracle of life. It brings out the best of us; it brings us all together and changes our lives. Having a fresh addition to the family coming to the house, you can feel the joy spreading through the family like a virus. It’s so obvious you can feel it in the air. Congratulations! We wish you many happy moments!

But here’s a problem — you haven’t had an infant in the house before. Look at all the sharp edges and pointy corners everywhere, slippery hard floors, chemicals, electricity, pets. There are a ton of things that might hurt your baby.

baby exploring

    Getting a baby crib and some basic baby equipment isn’t enough. Oh no, you need to take care of the entire house. By that, we mean you need to make sure your child is protected from the environment. There is no way to create a perfectly baby-proof environment, and even if you manage to do it, you can’t keep your infant inside all the time. You can’t avoid all the risks and possible accidents, so there is no point in worrying yourself to sleep every night. Parenting is a big task, if not the biggest one in life; it brings both joy and restless nights to people around the world.

    Today we’re tackling the topic of babyproofing the house for the arrival of your newborn. We’ve divided the process of babyproofing your home into sections. For the best results, you should approach the situation like this.

    Babyproofing the nursery

    The nursery comes first. You need to take care of several things when it comes to child safety in this room.

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    Getting a crib is just the start of the job. The location must be away from any possible source of hazard like windows, heaters, etc. The crib slats can’t have too much space between them — 2.3 inch or 6 centimetres is the maximum. As your kid grows up (you won’t believe how fast they grow), you’ll have to move the crib mattress to its lowest position. The reason for this is obvious — as soon as they realize, your baby will try to get out to explore the room.

    babyproof your house - baby crib

      Electrical cords need to be hidden because of the baby’s chewing habits. Electrical outlets in your entire house need to have safety covers, which are a must. Speaking of chewing, it’s good to move anything that baby might find interesting out of reach.

      A toddler can get hurt when they start walking around the cabinets curiously. The solution to this problem is to purchase childproof safety latches. You can find a variety of those here, and you can use them for every part of the house, not only for the nursery.

      The drawers can be the young one’s favorite entertainment as soon as they start exploring their surroundings, so make sure to keep them closed. The natural curiosity to see what’s inside will cause your baby to open the drawers all the time, so protect them with magnetic locks, a tension rod, or DIY version of it — a broomstick.

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      babyproof your house - drawers

        When it comes to the nursery, you need to think about the rugs and the floors in general. Make sure your rugs have non-skid backing. You need to check and repair your floors before the baby comes to avoid tripping. Consider soft floor matting for the entire nursery (or all areas where the infant will spend time) to prevent your baby from getting hurt.

        We all know that baby toys are cute, and they do look harmless, but in fact, a lot of stuffed toys in the baby crib can suffocate them. Make sure that the toys are on the shelves until the baby is old enough to play with them.

        A good thing to consider for your nursery is an air humidifier. Babies are very sensitive and you need to make sure that humidity level in your nursery is set between 30 and 50 percent. If you’re taking care of your health as well, air humidifiers are definitely welcome; these products can change the aerial surroundings significantly. Your skin, lungs, sinuses, eyes, and brain will feel the effects of these products quickly. Air humidifiers are great for preventing respiratory illnesses and skin problems, and they can improve the quality of life significantly. They are not useful only during winter. Just keep them cleaned once a week, don’t use any aromatized or perfumed water, and enjoy the benefits.

        babyproof your house - air humdifiers

          Still, humidifier models suited for babies are a bit different, and if you’re using one for yourself, you should know this by now. Check out the guide to best air humidifiers for babies to see the difference. When your child gets ill for the first time, it will make the situation much easier. Baby air humidifiers can help your baby get to sleep easier and have a better sleep, which is imperative in the first period of life when it is growing rapidly.

          Kitchen

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          babyproof your house - kitchen

            The kitchen is a potential danger to your newborn and should be avoided at all times. The dishwasher is the first problem because of the easy access to knives, forks, and all the sharp kitchen stuff. The rule for drawers and cabinets goes here as well. Keep them locked and away from the child’s reach.

            Small children can get seriously injured by touching a hot pan or by tripping on an open stove, so make sure your kitchen appliances are always off when the kids are in the kitchen.

            Babyproofing the bathroom

            babyproofing your house - bathroom

              The first thing to have in mind is the slippery bathroom floor, and the best things to use are nonslip mats both in and out of the tub. Next, there are pointy tips to consider and toiletries which may contain toxic materials. The toilet itself is one of the most important things; a toilet baby lock keeps the curious baby away the best.

              After a while, your baby will grow enough to grab everything which seems interesting and you need to install an out-of-reach cabinet to lock away all your medicines and harmful chemicals while your baby is in the bathroom. You always have to be careful and think ahead. Preparation is key.

              Living room

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              babyproofing your house - living room

                The living room is the place where we spend most of our day, and there are many safety issues to consider if you want your baby to be safe here. Starting from the ground up, all different kinds of furniture are potential dangers to your baby, and you need to be sure you’ve secured everything correctly. By this, we mean everything from TV stands to coffee tables and window edges — you need safety foam bumpers everywhere (for some cheaper DIY options, look here).

                babyproofing your home - the livingroom

                  If your living room has stairs or a fireplace, that also needs to be secured with a guard door to prevent any possible dangers. Bricks, ceramic tiles, and other sharp corners might be very harmful to your baby.

                  Valuables and possibly dangerous things such as knives, guns, or exploding mechanisms must be completely hidden, preferably in a safe. If you own a weapon, it is imperative to stash it in a proper gun safe, alongside ammunition or any dangerous things that might jeopardize the safety of your infant.

                  Your kid might never be safe enough

                  But you have to let go.

                  Kids bring joy, inspiration, and happiness in our lives. But, on the other hand, they carry responsibilities, troubles, and fears. Many times we’re crippled by fear, and we overreact simply because we care so much for our beloved children. It’s smart and cautious to babyproof your house, to minimize the possible injuries and accidents.

                  Still, you have to deal with the fact that eventually, your child will hurt themself somehow. While babyproofing a house, people tend to forget themselves and go way overprotective. Preventing a baby from opening a drawer with chemicals inside is a smart idea, but remember to have a dose of sanity while you’re doing it.

                  We wish you happy (and safe) times!

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                  Dejan Kvrgic

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                  Last Updated on July 28, 2020

                  14 Low GI Foods for a Healthier Diet

                  14 Low GI Foods for a Healthier Diet

                  Diet trends may come and go, but a low-GI diet remains one of the few that has been shown to include benefits based on science. Low GI foods provide substantial health benefits over those with a high index, and they are key to maintaining a healthy weight.

                  What is GI? Glycemic index (GI) is the rate at which the carbohydrate content of a food is broken down into glucose and absorbed from the gut into the blood. When you eat foods containing carbohydrates, your body breaks them down into glucose, which is then absorbed into your bloodstream.[1]

                  The higher the GI of a food, the faster it will be broken down and cause your blood glucose (sugar) to rise. Foods with a high GI rating are digested very quickly and cause your blood sugar to spike. This is why it’s advisable to stick to low GI foods as much as possible, as the carbohydrate content of low GI foods will be digested slowly, allowing a more gradual rise in blood glucose levels.

                  Foods with a GI scale rating of 70 or more are considered to be high GI. Foods with a rating of 55 or below are considered low GI foods.

                  It’s important to note that the glycemic index of a food doesn’t factor in the quantity that you eat. For example, although watermelon has a high glycemic index, the water and fiber content of a standard serving of water means it won’t have a significant impact on your blood sugar.

                  Like watermelon, some high GI foods (such as baked potatoes) are high in nutrients. And some low GI foods (such as corn chips) contain high amounts of trans fats.

                  In most cases, however, the GI is an important means of gauging the right foods for a healthy diet.

                  Eating mainly low GI foods every day helps to provide your body with a slow, continuous supply of energy. The carbohydrates in low GI foods is digested slowly, so you feel satisfied for longer. This means you’ll be less likely to suffer from fluctuating sugar levels that can lead to cravings and snacking.

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                  Let’s continue with some of the best examples of low GI foods.

                  1. Quinoa

                  GI: 53

                  Quinoa has a slightly higher GI than rice or barley, but it contains a much higher proportion of protein. If you don’t get enough protein from the rest of your diet, quinoa could help. It’s technically a seed, so it’s also high in fiber–again, more than most grains. It’s also gluten-free, which makes it excellent for those with Celiac disease or gluten intolerance.

                  2. Brown Rice (Steamed)

                  GI: 50

                  Versatile and satisfying, brown rice is one of the best low GI foods and is a staple for many dishes around the world. It’s whole rice from which only the husk (the outermost layer) is removed, so it’s a great source of fiber. In fact, brown rice has been shown to help lower cholesterol, improve digestive function, promote fullness, and may even help prevent the formation of blood clots. Just remember to always choose brown over white!

                  3. Corn on the Cob

                  GI: 48

                  Although it tastes sweet, corn on the cob is a good source of slow-burning energy (and one of the tastiest low GI foods). It’s also a good plant source of Vitamin B12, folic acid, and iron, all of which are required for the healthy production of red blood cells in the body. It’s healthiest when eaten without butter and salt!

                  4. Bananas

                  GI: 47

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                  Bananas are a superfood in many ways. They’re rich in potassium and manganese and contain a good amount of vitamin C. Their low GI rating means they’re great for replenishing your fuel stores after a workout.

                  They are easy to add to smoothies, cereal, or kept on your desk for a quick snack. The less ripe they are, the lower the sugar content is! As one of the best low GI foods, it’s a great addition to any daily diet.

                  5. Bran Cereal

                  GI: 43

                  Bran is famous for being one of the highest cereal sources of fiber. It’s also rich in a huge range of nutrients: calcium, folic acid, iron, magnesium, and a host of B vitamins. Although bran may not be to everyone’s tastes, it can easily be added to other cereals to boost the fiber content and lower the overall GI rating.

                  6. Natural Muesli

                  GI: 40

                  Muesli–when made with unsweetened rolled oats, nuts, dried fruit, and other sugar-free ingredients–is one of the healthiest ways to start the day. It’s also very easy to make at home with a variety of other low GI foods. Add yogurt and fresh fruit for a nourishing, energy-packed breakfast.

                  7. Apples

                  GI: 40

                  Apple skin is a great source of pectin, an important prebiotic that helps to feed the good bacteria in your gut. Apples are also high in polyphenols, which function as antioxidants, and contain a good amount of vitamin C. They are best eaten raw with the skin on! Apples are one of a number of fruits[2] that have a low glycemic index. Be careful which fruits you choose, as many have a large amount of natural sugars[3].

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                  8. Apricots

                  GI: 30

                  Apricots provide both fiber and potassium, which make them an ideal snack for both athletes and anyone trying to keep sugar cravings at bay. They’re also a source of antioxidants and a range of minerals.

                  Apricots can be added to salads, cereals, or eaten as part of a healthy mix with nuts at any time of the day.

                  9. Kidney Beans

                  GI: 29

                  Kidney beans and other legumes provide a substantial serving of plant-based protein, so they can be used in lots of vegetarian dishes if you’re looking to adopt a plant-based diet[4]. They’re also packed with fiber and a variety of minerals, vitamins, antioxidants, and other beneficial plant compounds. They are great in soups, stews, or with (whole grain) tacos.

                  10. Barley

                  GI: 22

                  Barley is a cereal grain that can be eaten in lots of ways. It’s an excellent source of B vitamins, including niacin, thiamin, and pyridoxine (vitamin B-6), fiber, molybdenum, manganese, and selenium. It also contains beta-glucans, a type of fiber that can support gut health and has been shown to reduce appetite and food intake.

                  Please note that barley does contain gluten, which makes it unsuitable for anyone who is Celiac[5] or who follows a gluten-free diet. In this case, gluten-free alternatives might include quinoa, buckwheat, or millet.

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                  11. Raw Nuts

                  GI: 20

                  Most nuts have a low GI of between 0 and 20, with cashews slightly higher at around 22. Nuts, as one of the best low GI foods, are a crucial part of the Mediterranean diet[6] and are really the perfect snack: they’re a source of plant-based protein, high in fiber, and contain healthy fats. Add them to smoothies and salads to boost the nutritional content. Try to avoid roasted and salted nuts, as these are made with large amounts of added salt and (usually) trans fats.

                  12. Carrots

                  GI: 16

                  Raw carrots are not only a delicious low GI vegetable, but they really do help your vision! They contain vitamin A (beta carotene) and a host of antioxidants. They’re also low-calorie and high in fiber, and they contain good amounts of vitamin K1, potassium, and antioxidants. Carrots are great for those monitoring their weight as they’ve been linked to lower cholesterol levels.

                  13. Greek Yogurt

                  GI: 12

                  Unsweetened Greek yogurt is not only low GI, but it’s an excellent source of calcium and probiotics, as well. Probiotics help to keep your gut microbiome in balance and support your overall digestive health and immune function. Greek yogurt makes a healthy breakfast, snack, dessert, or a replacement for dip. The most common probiotic strains found in yogurt are Streptococcus thermophilus[7] (found naturally in yogurt) and Lactobacillus acidophilus[8] (which is often added by the manufacturer). You can also look into probiotic supplements for improving your gut health.

                  14. Hummus

                  GI: 6

                  When made the traditional way from chickpeas and tahini, hummus is a fantastic, low-GI dish. It’s a staple in many Middle Eastern countries and can be eaten with almost any savory meal. Full of fiber to maintain satiety and feed your good gut bacteria, hummus is great paired with freshly-chopped vegetables, such as carrots and celery.

                  Bottom Line

                  If you’re looking to eat healthier or simply cut down on snacking throughout the day, eating low GI foods is a great way to get started. Choose any of the above foods for a healthy addition to your daily diet and start feeling better for longer.

                  More Tips on Eating Healthy

                  Featured photo credit: Alexander Mils via unsplash.com

                  Reference

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