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What is Bad Writing? 3 Successful Writers Stephen King Can’t Stand

What is Bad Writing? 3 Successful Writers Stephen King Can’t Stand

We all have our own list of favorite authors. Some we have decided to keep a secret because we’re afraid of the judgment we’ll face if we say their names out loud. While your friends are making fun of people who read romance novels or light summer reads, you want to raise your hand and say, “HEY! That’s me! I read those! At least I’m reading, you jerks!” And that’s just it—at least you are reading.

In a world where we see people too busy looking down at their phones to check out their latest social feed, you’re sitting outside on your lunch break enjoying a new book. But it’s not only “cultured” readers who look forward to roasting an author they deem as insipid or impuissant. There are other prominent writers out there who have no qualms discussing the literary failings of their peers.

All Hail the King!

Stephen King is one such author who holds nothing back. A New York Times bestselling novelist, King made a name for himself with his novels Carrie, IT, and The Shining. Widely known for his work in the fantasy and horror genres, King has published 55 novels to date and won a vast number of awards for his work.

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Despite winning literary awards and having a large number of works published, does that give King the right to degrade another author’s writing? Stephen King fans are inclined to agree; he’s earned the right.” Others that think King’s writing is overwrought will decidedly answer “No, he’s a talentless hack himself.”

There are three popular-selling authors whom King has had less than complimentary remarks for, including Dean Koontz, Stephenie Meyer and James Patterson. King himself has said, “talent is cheaper than table salt. What separated the talented individual from the successful one is a lot of hard work.” So what is it about the three aforementioned authors that King finds to be abhorrent?

Dean Koontz

With 14 New York Times bestsellers under his belt, it’s hard to argue against Koontz’s writing merit. Having won the Atlantic Monthly fiction competition when he was only a senior in college, Koontz has gained notoriety through the years for his storytelling in the horror, thriller and suspense genres.

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Yet despite the acclaim he has received and the hundreds of millions of books he has sold, Stephen King does not count himself among Koontz fans. In an interview with USA Weekend back in 2009, King said that Koontz’s writing is “sometimes … just awful.” But why is it awful? Could it be because they write in the same genres, and are therefore in competition with each other? Who can tell.

Stephenie Meyer

Whether you’re a Stephenie Meyer fan or not, we can all agree that her work has been commercially successful. Twilight was rated as the New York Times Editor’s Choice and Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year.

Selling more than 250 million copies, Meyer’s Twilight series about an angst 70-something vampire in love with a teenage mortal he met in a high-school science class literally captured the minds of millions. Turned into a successful film franchise not long thereafter, Twilight has cemented itself in contemporary vampire lore.

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For Stephen King however, Stephenie Meyer is not to be saluted for her writing prowess. Of Stephenie Meyer King said, “[Meyer] can’t write worth a darn. She’s not very good.” He further compares Meyer’s work with JK Rowling to help prove his point. Though both Meyer and Rowling write fantasy, is it fair to compare the two when they do not write about the same subject matter?

James Patterson

James Patterson’s books have sold over 350 million copies worldwide and Patterson is the current Guinness World Record holder for the most #1 New York Times bestsellers. Having written novels for all age groups in various genres, Patterson has continued to challenge himself and his readers. King doesn’t see it this way.

Speaking about James Patterson, King was quoted as saying, “[Patterson is] a terrible writer [who is] very, very successful.” If you were to define writing prowess based on the number of sales, King would tell you that it means nothing. Does it matter that Patterson has sold millions of copies of his books? No. But it has to mean something, doesn’t it? If people didn’t like his writing style or storytelling devices, he wouldn’t be so successful, would he?

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Now here’s really something to think about: if the writing of these three authors is so terrible, how is it they sell so many books? How is it they have all appeared on the New York Times bestsellers list? Everyone is entitled to their opinions, but you need some kind of proof to back up an argument.

Featured photo credit: VFS Digital Design via imcreator.com

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Last Updated on February 13, 2019

10 Things Happy People Do Differently

10 Things Happy People Do Differently

Think being happy is something that happens as a result of luck, circumstance, having money, etc.? Think again.

Happiness is a mindset. And if you’re looking to improve your ability to find happiness, then check out these 10 things happy people do differently.

Happiness is not something ready made. It comes from your own actions. -Dalai Lama

1. Happy people find balance in their lives.

Folks who are happy have this in common: they’re content with what they have, and don’t waste a whole lot of time worrying and stressing over things they don’t. Unhappy people do the opposite: they spend too much time thinking about what they don’t have. Happy people lead balanced lives. This means they make time for all the things that are important to them, whether it’s family, friends, career, health, religion, etc.

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2. Happy people abide by the golden rule.

You know that saying you heard when you were a kid, “Do unto others as you would have them do to you.” Well, happy people truly embody this principle. They treat others with respect. They’re sensitive to the thoughts and feelings of other people. They’re compassionate. And they get treated this way (most of the time) in return.

3. Happy people don’t sweat the small stuff.

One of the biggest things happy people do differently compared to unhappy people is they let stuff go. Bad things happen to good people sometimes. Happy people realize this, are able to take things in stride, and move on. Unhappy people tend to dwell on minor inconveniences and issues, which can perpetuate feelings of sadness, guilt, resentment, greed, and anger.

4. Happy people take responsibility for their actions.

Happy people aren’t perfect, and they’re well aware of that. When they screw up, they admit it. They recognize their faults and work to improve on them. Unhappy people tend to blame others and always find an excuse why things aren’t going their way. Happy people, on the other hand, live by the mantra:

“There are two types of people in the world: those that do and those that make excuses why they don’t.”

5. Happy people surround themselves with other happy people.

happiness surrounding

    One defining characteristic of happy people is they tend to hang out with other happy people. Misery loves company, and unhappy people gravitate toward others who share their negative sentiments. If you’re struggling with a bout of sadness, depression, worry, or anger, spend more time with your happiest friends or family members. Chances are, you’ll find that their positive attitude rubs off on you.

    6. Happy people are honest with themselves and others.

    People who are happy often exhibit the virtues of honesty and trustworthiness. They would rather give you candid feedback, even when the truth hurts, and they expect the same in return. Happy people respect people who give them an honest opinion.

    7. Happy people show signs of happiness.

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    smile

      This one may sound obvious but it’s a key differentiator between happy and unhappy people. Think about your happiest friends. Chances are, the mental image you form is of them smiling, laughing, and appearing genuinely happy. On the flip side, those who aren’t happy tend to look the part. Their posture may be slouched and you may perceive a lack of confidence.

      8. Happy people are passionate.

      Another thing happy people have in common is their ability to find their passions in life and pursue those passions to the fullest. Happy people have found what they’re looking for, and they spend their time doing what they love.

      9. Happy people see challenges as opportunities.

      Folks who are happy accept challenges and use them as opportunities to learn and grow. They turn negatives into positives and make the best out of seemingly bad situations. They don’t dwell on things that are out of their control; rather, they seek solutions and creative ways of overcoming obstacles.

      10. Happy people live in the present.

      While unhappy people tend to dwell on the past and worry about the future, happy people live in the moment. They are grateful for “the now” and focus their efforts on living life to the fullest in the present. Their philosophy is:

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      There’s a reason it’s called “the present.” Because life is a gift.

      So if you’d like to bring a little more happiness into your life, think about the 10 principles above and how you can use them to make yourself better.

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