Advertising
Advertising

5 Ways to Outsmart Hotels and Save Money

5 Ways to Outsmart Hotels and Save Money

When it comes to dealing with hotels, know that you have the advantage. Hotels are a permanent fixture, which means they can’t change their location and they’re entirely dependent on foot traffic. You, on the other hand, have the option of walking nearby to inquire at competing hotels. And with searches on your phone, you can quickly find key information such as room rates and occupancy levels in your city.

A Google search reveals that in the U.S. the average room rate is between $122 to $137 per night. In 2015, hotel prices rose 3 percent, according to Hotel Price Index (HPI).

Here are ways to cut your hotel costs.

  1. Book late and use rewards programs

In the airline industry, ticket fares increase the longer you wait to book a flight but the opposite is true for the hotel industry. Room rates decrease the longer you wait (to book your room) because these establishments are motivated to increase their occupancy.

There are many tools at your disposal. For instance, HotelTonight is a mobile app that lists discounts at thousands of hotels. Room rates found on the app typically decrease the longer you wait to reserve your room — the later it gets, the more hotels slash their prices to avoid having too many empty beds. On average, the app’s users save 17 percent, according to CEO Sam Shank in an interview with Lifehack.

Advertising

Secondly, consider using hotel rewards or card programs. In the case with HotelTonight, the app has a partnership with Capital One that gives Venture and VentureOne cardholders an extra 10 percent discount on top of other savings. Card reward programs often bundle their offers with other promotions. So in this case, Venture cardholders will earn unlimited double miles while VentureOne customers continue to earn 1.25 miles on their purchase.

So do your research. Almost all major credit cards and airlines have partnerships with hotel chains — some award points that accrue toward a free hotel stay or airline ticket and other perks.

  1. Find off-peak times and occupancy levels

Go online and look for off-peak times and occupancy levels in your target city. This is possible through the power of search engines. Media outlets and consulting firms often publish occupancy levels in key cities. A Google search reveals that occupancy rates averaged 84 percent in San Francisco in a recent year, but these levels can be as low as 60 percent in Miami during a certain period.

If nearby hotels have higher numbers of empty beds than they’d like to admit, you should leverage that information to negotiate a lower rate. If you stay for a week, the savings could add up to hundreds of dollars. And that leads to our next tip.

Find out when offseason takes place. It won’t be near the Super Bowl and it won’t take place near March Madness. Hotels may also slash prices at the end of summer or right after holidays, or during midweek (compared weekends). If you’re staying at a hotel and you’re seeing a big crowd, chances are you’re also paying a higher price. It’s Economics 101: More demand equals higher prices while more supply means lower prices.

Advertising

If you plan to frequent a specific hotel, then introduce yourself to the manager. Negotiate your rate or ask for a room upgrade. Most hotel managers are well-connected and it’s a shortcut to discovering the ins-and-outs of a locale that you may not know about.

Airplane-wing
    1. Use coupons and vouchers

    Go online and research coupon and hotel voucher sites. They can shave off the room price as well as give your various other benefits. For example, airport hotels can offer free parking, airport shuttle or a cheaper flight. So consider how smaller savings from various sources can add up to a tidy sum.

    A casino hotel may offer free tickets to a show or provide free meals and drinks. If you’re likely to miss breakfast, get a to-go box and save your meal. Take advantage. Hotels want to give you these perks. Competitors are nearby, and being a fixture, hotels are permanently stuck to their location. You’re not.

    1. Travel like a local

    Traveling shouldn’t bind you to perpetually patronize restaurants and local shops to the point where your bank account is in the red. Restaurants and shops located inside the hotel are particularly expensive. Moreover, when you go abroad tourist hotspots are known to significantly inflate prices if you look like a foreigner. Adjust accordingly and you won’t get ripped off.

    Advertising

    When it comes to dining, there are hotels that have kitchenettes, so you can buy gastronomical delights and cook at your leisure. If you’re traveling abroad, ask the hotel’s front desk if you can get a discount or other perks if you pay in U.S. dollars. The greenback represents a stable currency that, in some cases, is more redeemable than local fiat money.

    1. Ignore entertainment packages

    There are mobile apps that will help you find worthwhile activities. Apps such as ‘CityMaps’ will show you nearby attractions while ‘Peek’ helps you book nearby activities and tours.

    For the most part, forget the hotel’s organized tours and entertainment packages. Most of these packages have significant markups where the hotel collects a nice commission. If you want to go diving, going outside the hotel premises to a nearby diving shop will usually save you money.

    Some packages may not be a bad deal, but how will you really know unless you’re already familiar with local prices? Chances are, you’re not.

    And these packages can include destinations that you won’t necessarily enjoy — like a forced visit to the local zoo when all you really wanted to see was the coastline or historical museum. Always consider that the hotel and tour company may get commissions from forcing you to eat at a particular restaurant or by forcing you to visit a certain destination. They are for-profit enterprises. It’s also tough to back out when the package deal already includes the entry fee to places that you don’t want to visit.

    Advertising

    Traveling is fun and it should be done smartly. It can definitely be accomplished without breaking your wallet. As Warren Buffett says, “Price is what you pay but value is what you get.”

    Airport-waiting-lounge 2 - Picjumbo - Lifehack

      Featured photo credit: William Warby via flickr.com

      More by this author

      Marvin Dumont

      Entrepreneur, Disruptor

      Tips for Shoring up your Finances in 2017 5 Ways Technology Can Make Your Travel Stress-Free 5 Last-Minute Holiday Shopping Tips to Beat the Holiday Rush Five Myths that can Harm your Credit Score 5 Ways to Outsmart Hotels and Save Money

      Trending in Lifestyle

      1 How to Live Longer? 21 Ways to Live a Long Life 2 15 Brain Foods That Will Super Boost Your Brain Power 3 13 Essential Self-Care Tips for Busy People 4 How to Reduce Mental Stress Quickly (And Naturally) 5 Overcome Fear and Anxiety with These 4 Mindset Shifts

      Read Next

      Advertising
      Advertising
      Advertising

      Last Updated on March 25, 2020

      How to Live Longer? 21 Ways to Live a Long Life

      How to Live Longer? 21 Ways to Live a Long Life

      When it comes to living long, genes aren’t everything. Research has revealed a number of simple lifestyle changes you can make that could help to extend your life, and some of them may surprise you.

      So, how to live longer? Here are 21 ways to help you live a long life

      1. Exercise

      It’s no secret that physical activity is good for you. Exercise helps you maintain a healthy body weight and lowers your blood pressure, both of which contribute to heart health and a reduced risk of heart disease–the top worldwide cause of death.

      2. Drink in Moderation

      I know you’re probably picturing a glass of red wine right now, but recent research suggests that indulging in one to three glasses of any type of alcohol every day may help to increase longevity.[1] Studies have found that heavy drinkers as well as abstainers seem to have a higher risk of early mortality than moderate drinkers.

      3. Reduce Stress in Your Life

      Stress causes your body to release a hormone called cortisol. At high levels, this hormone can increase blood pressure and cause storage of abdominal fat, both of which can lead to an increased risk of heart disease.

      4. Watch Less Television

      A 2008 study found that people who watch six hours of television per day will likely die an average of 4.8 years earlier than those who don’t.[2] It also found that, after the age of 25, every hour of television watched decreases life expectancy by 22 minutes.

      Advertising

      Television promotes inactivity and disengagement from the world, both of which can shorten your lifespan.

      5. Eat Less Red Meat

      Red meat consumption is linked to an increased risk of heart disease and cancer.[3] Swapping out your steaks for healthy proteins, like fish, may help to increase longevity.

      If you can’t stand the idea of a steak-free life, reducing your consumption to less than two to three servings a week can still incur health benefits.

      6. Don’t Smoke

      This isn’t exactly a revelation. As you probably well know, smoking significantly increases your risk of cancer.

      7. Socialize

      Studies suggest that having social relationships promotes longevity.[4] Although scientists are unsure of the reasons behind this, they speculate that socializing leads to increased self esteem as well as peer pressure to maintain health.

      8. Eat Foods Rich in Omega-3 Fatty Acids

      Omega-3 fatty acids decrease the risk of heart disease[5] and perhaps even Alzheimer’s disease.[6] Salmon and walnuts are two of the best sources of Omega-3s.

      Advertising

      9. Be Optimistic

      Studies suggest that optimists are at a lower risk for heart disease and, generally, live longer than pessimists.[7] Researchers speculate that optimists have a healthier approach to life in general–exercising more, socializing, and actively seeking out medical advice. Thus, their risk of early mortality is lower.

      10. Own a Pet

      Having a furry-friend leads to decreased stress, increased immunity, and a lessened risk of heart disease.[8] Depending on the type of pet, they can also motivate you to be more active.

      11. Drink Coffee

      Studies have found a link between coffee consumption and longer life.[9] Although the reasons for this aren’t entirely clear, coffee’s high levels of antioxidants may play a role. Remember, though, drowning your cup of joe in sugar and whipped cream could counter whatever health benefits it may hold.

      12. Eat Less

      Japan has the longest average lifespan in the world, and the longest lived of the Japanese–the natives of the Ryukyu Islands–stop eating when they’re 80% full. Limiting your calorie intake means lower overall stress on the body.

      13. Meditate

      Meditation leads to stress reduction and lowered blood pressure.[10] Research suggests that it could also increase the activity of an enzyme associated with longevity.[11]

      Taking as little as 15 minutes a day to find your zen can have significant health benefits, and may even extend your life.

      Advertising

      How to meditate? Here’re 8 Meditation Techniques for Complete Beginners

      14. Maintain a Healthy Weight

      Being overweight puts stress on your cardiovascular system, increasing your risk of heart disease.[12] It may also increase the risk of cancer.[13] Maintaining a healthy weight is important for heart health and living a long and healthy life.

      15. Laugh Often

      Laughter reduces the levels of stress hormones, like cortisol, in your body. High levels of these hormones can weaken your immune system.

      16. Don’t Spend Too Much Time in the Sun

      Too much time in the sun can lead to an increased risk of skin cancer. However, sun exposure is an excellent way to increase levels of vitamin D, so soaking up a few rays–perhaps for around 15 minutes a day–can be healthy. The key is moderation.

      17. Cook Your Own Food

      When you eat at restaurants, you surrender control over your diet. Even salads tend to have a large number of additives, from sugar to saturated fats. Eating at home will enable you to monitor your food intake and ensure a healthy diet.

      Take a look at these 14 Healthy Easy Recipes for People on the Go and start to cook your own food.

      Advertising

      18. Eat Mushrooms

      Mushrooms are a central ingredient in Dr. Joel Fuhrman’s GOMBS disease fighting diet. They boost the immune system and may even reduce the risk of cancer.[14]

      19. Floss

      Flossing helps to stave off gum disease, which is linked to an increased risk of cancer.[15]

      20. Eat Foods Rich in Antioxidants

      Antioxidants fight against the harmful effects of free-radicals, toxins which can cause cell damage and an increased risk of disease when they accumulate in the body. Berries, green tea and broccoli are three excellent sources of antioxidants.

      Find out more antiosidants-rich foods here: 13 Delicious Antioxidant Foods That Are Great for Your Health

      21. Have Sex

      Getting down and dirty two to three times a week can have significant health benefits. Sex burns calories, decreases stress, improves sleep, and may even protect against heart disease.[16] It’s an easy and effective way to get exercise–so love long and prosper!

      More Health Tips

      Featured photo credit: Sweethearts/Patrick via flickr.com

      Reference

      [1] Wiley Online Library: Late‐Life Alcohol Consumption and 20‐Year Mortality
      [2] BMJ Journals: Television viewing time and reduced life expectancy: a life table analysis
      [3] Arch Intern Med.: Red Meat Consumption and Mortality
      [4] PLOS Medicine: Social Relationships and Mortality Risk: A Meta-analytic Review
      [5] JAMA: Fish and Omega-3 Fatty Acid Intake and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Women
      [6] NCBI: Effects of Omega‐3 Fatty Acids on Cognitive Function with Aging, Dementia, and Neurological Diseases: Summary
      [7] Mayo Clinic Proc: Prediction of all-cause mortality by the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory Optimism-Pessimism Scale scores: study of a college sample during a 40-year follow-up period.
      [8] Med Hypotheses.: Pet ownership protects against the risks and consequences of coronary heart disease.
      [9] The New England Journal of Medicine: Association of Coffee Drinking with Total and Cause-Specific Mortality
      [10] American Journal of Hypertension: Blood Pressure Response to Transcendental Meditation: A Meta-analysis
      [11] Science Direct: Intensive meditation training, immune cell telomerase activity, and psychological mediators
      [12] JAMA: The Disease Burden Associated With Overweight and Obesity
      [13] JAMA: The Disease Burden Associated With Overweight and Obesity
      [14] African Journal of Biotechnology: Anti-cancer effect of polysaccharides isolated from higher basidiomycetes mushrooms
      [15] Science Direct: Periodontal disease, tooth loss, and cancer risk in male health professionals: a prospective cohort study
      [16] AHA Journals: Sexual Activity and Cardiovascular Disease

      Read Next