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5 simple tools to find the college that matches your personality

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5 simple tools to find the college that matches your personality

Have you ever wondered which college you would fit in the best? You have spent countless hours researching schools with your dream major, ideal weather, city size, and all other “necessary” academic parameters such as SAT score, Admit Rate, Avg., GPA etc. etc. But if you hate the next 4 to 6 years of your life, the weather won’t cheer you up, and the city size won’t help much!

There is no question about the fact that your peers will have a significant influence on your college experience. In this article, we will show you five hacks to find the college that has folks you want to hang out with, form lifelong friendships, and maybe even tie the knot.

1: The Google Hack

This is an awesome hack that can quickly give you an impression of what goes down at each school. Open up the Google search and search for the term: “<school name>” + “pranks”. Insert the name of your target school in <school name>.

Example terms: “MIT pranks”

Voila, you will see a list of pranks that MIT students have famously pulled – from dragging cars to the top of the MIT Dome, to making Pac-Man and Blinky appear on the scaffolding covering the Great Dome during reconstruction in 2013.

You will also get a list of links to Wikipedia, Wired Magazine, and MIT website itself where you can read about the “mostly nerdy’ pranks or hacks as they are called, pulled by MIT students.

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College Personality Match - GoSchoolWise

    Let’s take another example: “Georgia Tech pranks”

    You can get a lot of dirt on the Georgia Tech and UGA rivalry, including a Georgia Tech student hacking UGA’s website.

    School Personality Match - GoSchoolWise.com

      You get the idea now try it.

      2. The Life with Filters – Instagram – Hack

      A picture is worth a thousand words, and if you add a filter to the picture, the words become memorable – first heard on LifeHack in this post ;)

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      Almost every school has an Instagram account, and even though it is maintained by the school, looking at the images can give you a fantastic idea of the life and experience the school promotes. From the beautiful outdoorsy pictures on UC Berkeley’s Instagram to the amazing skyline and buzz of New York City highlighted in the Columbia University’s Instagram, you can get the feel of the student environment.

      3. The Artificial Intelligence – GoSchoolWise – Hack

      Sometimes it is better to sit back and let the world’s smartest supercomputer – IBM Watson (the computer that beat a human in the game of Jeopardy) do the hard work.

      GoSchoolWise.com, a startup that uses Data Analytics and AI to help high school students and their parents with college admissions, uses IBM Watson to analyze the social media activity of colleges and creates a detailed profile of students at those schools called the SchoolDNA. You can go to each college page and see its SchoolDNA.

      See example traits of students at Harvard

      Harvard SchoolDNA - College Personality Match - GoSchoolWise.com

         Here is another example of students at UT Austin:

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        UT Austin SchoolDNA - College Personality Match - GoSchoolWise.com

          But guess what? GoSchoolWise.com has taken this a step further with a handy tool that analyzes your writing (e.g., essay, tweets), and determines your personality (it is actually fun to learn about yourself) and finds out how well you will fit in at each of your target schools. You can see the full student traits, and get your personality analysis as many times as you want with a free account.

          4. The Motion Picture – Youtube Hack

          Static images are powerful, but sometimes seeing a video can make for a more immersive experience. Like Instagram, most schools have an official Youtube account. Some schools might even have multiple accounts focused on different aspects – Admissions, Sports, Student Life etc.

          Watching a school’s Youtube videos can give you a good sense of what to expect from a school. In a lot of Youtube videos, you can directly hear from current students about their experience as well. However, take this with a grain of salt. No school will publish a video of a student who has less than stellar things to say about her or his experience at the school.

          Check out the Youtube video of Stanford University

          Another of University of Central Florida

           5. The Student Reviews – Niche – Hack

          Wouldn’t it be nice to hear the unfiltered reviews from students? Well, there is a website for that – Niche.com.

          You can search thousands of colleges and read what current students have to say about the school. Also, the website aggregates the reviews in different categories, and you can get a good idea of how a school does on a number of different dimensions such as Academics, Athletics, Party Scene, Greek Life etc.

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          Here are some reviews for University of Pennsylvania:

          “The teachers are helpful and are there when students need help. The students are driven to do there work and help the others around them when they don’t get it.”

          “Greek life has a definite presence at my school, but plenty of people do not participate as well. Non-Greeks do not really think differently about Greeks, since everyone here is clearly intelligent and unique or else they would not have gotten in.”

          Grades for Carnegie Mellon University:

          Academics: A+

          Campus Quality: B

          Off-Campus Dining: A-

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          Party Scene: B+

          Remember, the hacks here are not to substitute the “boring”, but necessary search you have to do to find the school based on your desired major, academic stats etc. These hacks are to supplement that search. Good luck.

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          Last Updated on November 25, 2021

          How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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          How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

          There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

          Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

            What Does Private Browsing Do?

            When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

            For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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            The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

            The Terminal Archive

            While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

            Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

            dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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            Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

            Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

            However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

            Clearing Your Tracks

            Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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            dscacheutil -flushcache

            As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

            Other Browsers and Private Browsing

            Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

            If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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            As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

            Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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