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You’re Exceptionally Creative If You See The Correct Image (Only 1/100 People Can Do This!)

You’re Exceptionally Creative If You See The Correct Image (Only 1/100 People Can Do This!)

What do you see in this drawing that baffled so many people?

creative people

      Only 1/100 guessed right, but for the rest it was completely mind-boggling.

      Try again. The trick that helped some was to cover the darker side of the image with their hand.

      creative people

          Here comes the spoiler…

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          image explained

            It’s actually a man with a cowboy hat!

            It took some people an entire hour to figure this one out, while the lucky few were able to see it right away. If you belong to the latter group, you can consider yourself a highly creative person as studies show.

            Creative processes have been considered highly abstract and unquantifiable practices, often considered as bursts of sudden inspiration that came out of nowhere. However, scientists have been able to conduct certain researches to catch the creative process in order to analyze the distinctive features that creative people have. What they came to realize was that creative people tend to use much bigger parts of their brain during the thought process. This gives them the opportunity to use more associations and memory when trying to decode something.

            In the case of image deconstruction, creative people have more to work with when looking at an unknown image which means they would much more quickly collect the previously known parts to build ideas.

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            Therefore, it is no wonder that to some people this puzzle was way too easy making them wonder what the catch was. However, you shouldn’t think something is wrong with you if no matter how long you looked at the drawing, all you could see was the distorted image of a bat or a rat. It just means that you process new information in a different way, usually in a slightly more formal way, following certain known rules and associations, whereas for creative people, this process includes more “outside the box” kind of thinking with more options to choose from.

            This drawing wasn’t the first one to spur up the conversation about the effect our thinking process has on the way we perceive the world. The famous duck-rabbit dilemma presented by American psychologist Joseph Jastrow in 1899, provided starting point for the research on the topic.

            Before reading any further, stop and look at the drawing.

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            What do you see? A duck or a rabbit? Can you easily find the other animal? Can you switch from one perspective to the other with ease, or does it take some effort?

            duck or rabbit

              For this drawing, there is not a wrong or right guess, (even though most people guess duck first) it is rather a question of the ability to quickly switch from one perception to the other.

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              All of these features count when determining if you are a highly or average creative person. According to the research Richard Wiseman did with a group of fellow psychologists at the University of Edinburgh, creative people actually perceive the world differently, as they are more able to see things from many different angles.

              Using the duck-rabbit drawing, the participants had to answer questions not much different than the ones above. Additionally, they were asked to list as many unusual usages for given every-day objects in a short amount of time. The results were clear: people who could effortlessly switch from one perception to another, also did much better in assigning new purpose to known objects.

              It is a much known trait of creative people to easily think of alternative ways and to find connection between two apparently unrelated concepts. Their brains are just that much faster when working on interpreting different aspects of a concept. Therefore, the results prove that there is a difference to how highly creative people perceive the world as opposed to average creative ones.

              Finally, if it wasn’t for creative geniuses and their ability to see things from many different perspectives, we would have been deprived of the many discoveries and innovations that helped shape the world as we know it.

              Featured photo credit: http://www.wimp.com/ via facebook.com

              More by this author

              Ana Erkic

              Social Media Consultant, Online Marketing Strategist, Copywriter, CEO and Co-Founder of Growato

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              Published on May 26, 2020

              7 Most Effective Problem Solving Techniques That Smart People Use

              7 Most Effective Problem Solving Techniques That Smart People Use

              Problems are, by their very nature, problematic. There are life problems, work problems, creative problems, and relationship problems. When we’re lucky, intuition takes over, and we solve a problem right away. When we’re not so lucky, we get stuck.

              We might spend weeks or even months obsessing over how to write that term paper, get out of debt, or win back the love of our life. But instead of obsessing, let’s look at some effective problem solving techniques that people in the know rely on.

              Ideation Vs Evaluation

              It’s important to first understand and separate two stages of creativity before we look at effective problem solving techniques. Ideation is like brainstorming. It’s the stage of creativity where we’re looking for as many possible solutions as we can think of. There’s no judgment or evaluation of ideas at this stage. More is more.

              After we’ve come up with as many solutions as possible, only then can we move onto the evaluation stage. This is when we analyze each possible solution and think about what works and what doesn’t. Here’s when all those good ideas from ideation rise to the top and the outlandish and impractical ones are abandoned.

              7 Problem Solving Techniques That Work

              Everyone has different ways of solving problems. Some are more creative, some are more organized. Some prefer to work on problems alone, others with a group. Check out the problem solving techniques below and find one that works for you.

              1. Lean on Your Squad

              The first of our seven problem solving techniques is to surround yourself with people you trust. Sometimes problems can be solved alone, but other times, you need some help.

              There’s a concept called emergence that begins to explain why groups may be better for certain kinds of problem solving. Steven Johnson describes emergence as bottom up system organization.[1] My favorite example is an ant colony. Ants don’t have a president or boss telling them what to do. Instead, the complicated organization of the ant colony comes out of each individual ant just fulfilling their biological destiny.

              Group creativity can also take on an emergent quality. When individuals really listen to, support, and add onto each other’s ideas, the sum of that group creativity can be much more than what any individual could have created on their own.

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              Therefore, if you are struggling to solve a problem, you may want to find a group of people with whom you can collaborate, so you can start riffing with them about possible solutions.

              2. Regulate Your Emotions

              The next of the problem solving techniques is to be honest about how you’re feeling. We can’t solve problems as efficiently when we’re stressed out or upset, so starting with some emotional self-awareness goes a long way in helping us problem solve.

              Dr. Daniel Siegel famously tells us to “Name it to tame it.” [2] He’s talking about naming our feelings, which offers us a better chance of regulating ourselves. I have to know that I’m stressed or upset if I want to calm down quickly in order to get back to a more optimal problem-solving state.

              After you know how you’re feeling, you can take steps to regulate that feeling. If you’re feeling stressed out or upset, you can take a walk or try breathing exercises. Mindfulness exercises can also help you regain your sense of presence.

              3. Listen

              One thing that good problem solvers do is listen. They collect all the information they can and process it carefully before even attempting to solve the problem.

              It’s tempting to jump right in and start problem solving before the scope of the problem is clear. But that’s a mistake.

              Smart problem solvers listen carefully in order to get as many points of view and perspectives as possible. This allows them to gain a better understanding of the problem, which gives them a huge advantage in solving that problem.

              4. Don’t Label Ideas as Bad…Yet

              The fourth of the seven problem solving techniques is to gather as many possible solutions as you can. There are no bad ideas…yet.

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              Think back to the two stages of creativity. When we are in the ideation stage, we shouldn’t be evaluating each other’s ideas, input, and possible solutions.

              When we evaluate, judge, and criticize during the ideation stage, we inadvertently hamper creativity. One possible outcome of evaluating during ideation is creative suppression.[3]

              When someone responds to someone else’s creative input with judgment or criticism, creative suppression can occur if the person who had the idea shuts down because of that judgment or criticism.

              Imagine you’re at a meeting brainstorming ways to boost your sales numbers. You suggest hiring a new team member, but your colleague rolls their eyes and says that can’t happen since the numbers are already down.

              Now, your colleague may be 100% correct. However, their comment might make you shut down for the rest of the meeting, which means your team won’t be getting any more possible solutions from you.

              If your colleague had waited to evaluate the merits of your idea until after the brainstorming session, your team could have come up with more possible solutions to their current problem.

              During the ideation stage, more is more. We want as many ideas as possible, so reserve the evaluation until there’s no more ideating left to do.

              Another trick for better ideating is to “Yes And” each other’s ideas[4] In improvisation, there’s a principle known as “Yes And.” It means that one improviser should agree with the other’s idea for the scene and then add a new detail onto that reality.

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              For example, if someone says, “I can’t hear over your loud music,” the other person needs to go along with that idea and then add onto it. They might say, “Sorry, I’ll turn it down, but I don’t think everyone else here at the club will appreciate it.”

              Now the scene is getting interesting. We’re in a club, and the DJ is going to turn the music down. Playing “Yes And” with each other made the scene better by filling in details about who and where the improvisers are.

              Yes Anding also works well during ideation sessions. Since we’ve already established that we shouldn’t be evaluating each other’s ideas yet, Yes Anding gives us something we can do. We can see the merits of each other’s ideas and try to build on them. This will make all of our possible solutions more fully realized than a simple laundry list.

              5. Approach Problems With Playfulness

              Approaching problem solving too seriously can exacerbate the problem. Sometimes we get too fixated on finding solutions and lose a sense of playfulness and fun.

              It makes sense. When there are deadlines and people counting on us, we can try to force solutions, but stepping back and approaching problems from a more playful perspective can lead to more innovative solutions.

              Think about how children approach problem solving. They don’t have the wealth of wisdom that decades on this planet give. Instead, they play around and try out imaginative and sometimes unpractical approaches.

              That’s great for problem solving. Instead of limiting ourselves to how things have always been done, a sense of play and playfulness can lead us to truly innovative, out-of-the-box solutions.

              6. Let the Unconscious Mind Roam

              This may seem counterintuitive, but another technique to try when you become too fixated on a problem is to take a break to let the unconscious mind take over for a bit.

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              Our conscious brain can only handle a limited amount of information at a time. Plus, it’s energetically exhausting to use our conscious brain for problem solving. Think about a time when you were studying for a test. It’s draining.[5]

              But we’re in luck. There’s another part of our brain that isn’t draining and can integrate tons more information at a time—our unconscious.

              This is why you come up with your best ideas in the shower or on your way to work or while you’re jogging. When you give your conscious brain a break, your unconscious has a chance to sift through mounds of information to arrive at solutions.

              It’s how I write my articles. With my conscious brain, I think about which article I’m going to write. My problem is how to write it, so once I think carefully about the topic, I take a break. Then, the structure, sources, content, and sometimes phrasing happens in fits and starts while I’m not thinking about the article at all. It happens when I’m lying in bed, showering, and walking in the woods.

              The key is to get in the habit of practicing this alternation between conscious and unconscious problem solving and to absolutely not force solutions. Sometimes, you just need to take a little break.

              7. Be Candid

              The last of the problem solving techniques happens during the evaluation stage. If we’re going to land on the best possible solution to our problems, we have to be able to openly and honestly evaluate ideas.

              During the evaluating stage, criticism and feedback need to be delivered honestly and respectfully. If an idea doesn’t work, that needs to be made clear. The goal is that everyone should care about and challenge each other. This creates an environment where people take risks and collaborate because they trust that everyone has their best interest in mind and isn’t going to pull any punches.

              Final Thoughts

              In order to come up with the best solutions for problems, ideation and evaluation have to be two distinct steps in the creative process. Then, you should tap into some of the above techniques to get your ideas organized and your problems solved.

              Hopefully, these seven problem solving techniques will help your problems be less…problematic.

              More Tips for Problem Solving

              Featured photo credit: Daria Nepriakhina via unsplash.com

              Reference

              [1] Steven Johnson: Emergence
              [2] Dr. Dan Siegel: The whole-brain child
              [3] American Psychological Association: Creative mortification
              [4] Play Your Way Sane: And What?: Yes And
              [5] Daniel Kahneman: Thinking, Fast and Slow

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