Advertising
Advertising

What You Need to Know About Swimming for Exercise

What You Need to Know About Swimming for Exercise

Swimmers know that this time of year, during the post-Olympic glow, is when the local lap lanes become a whole lot more crowded.

With a brand new swimsuit, goggles in hand, and stomach bursting with pride and motivation after watching the top swimmers in the world race over the course of a week, an intrepid wave of new and returning swimmers head to their local lap swims to take on the sport of swimming.

For some, watching the Olympics has gotten them excited to get back into the water, while for others, it’s their first foray into organized swimming.

You have a few different options for what to do:

  • Hit up the local lap swim. Almost every neighborhood pool has scheduled lap swims scattered over the course of the day. Late afternoon is typically one of the harder times to get pool time, as club teams, lessons, and other aquatic programs like synchro take advantage of the after-school hours to schedule programming. Swimming at your own pace is fun and safe in terms of the challenge. You can progress at your own pace, although the big limitation is that with no one to instruct you, there are some technical improvements to be missed out on.
  • Join a local club team. USA Swimming has nearly 3,000 club teams spread across the United States, so if you are a kid and you are looking to get competitive with the sport, you can start here by searching for a team in your area.
  • Sign up with a Masters team. There are heaps of benefits of swimming masters — they take everyone from newbies to former Olympians, meaning that whether you are dipping in for the first time or getting back into your age group hero days, there is a lane for you. You can learn more about whether there is a club near you here.

Building a Swim Workout

Assuming that you want to get a few sessions in on your own or you want to supplement the swimming workouts you are already getting, here is how to build your own swim workout.

Advertising

There are 4 parts to your typical swimming workout.

  1. The warm-up. If you have worked out in any capacity at any point in your life, you know the purpose behind this. Start with a low intensity to loosen up the arms and legs. How much you want to do varies with the workout at hand, but devote 20% of your total workout time. Throw in a bunch of kick work — it will really help increase your core temperature.
  2. Drill/Pre-set. Here is where we set the stage for the main set that is to come. Feeling loosey goosey, we escalate the intensity and attention to technique. Alternating efforts of moderate-intensity swimming with drill work is one of my favorite ways to go about this. For the drill work, pick those that reflect what you need to improve on the most in your stroke.
  3. The Main-set. The bread and butter! This is where the bulk of the hard work is done. What you end up doing here is unique to you and your goals in the water. For straight aerobic work, you could swim a series of 100’s with about 10 seconds rest in between, or unleash some high-end speed with a set of sprint 25’s and 50’s with a little bit more rest.
  4. The warm-down. Now that you have worked your butt off, it is time to kickstart the recovery process with a structured cool down. Depending on the intensity of your workout, the warm-down should last about 10-15% of your total workout (so 5-10 minutes for an hour workout). Remember to keep your technique intact and swim out the lactate and neuromuscular fatigue so that you can come back and take another healthy swing at tomorrow’s workout.

Breaking Down the Lingo of Competitive Swimming

If you’ve ever looked at the whiteboard at a swim practice, you might be forgiven for thinking you were staring at a Fourier equation. Heavy on abbreviations, short hand, and code that is recognizable only to that particular group of swimmers, it can be a lot to take in.

Here is a sample set and the explanation of how they are laid out:

8×50 freestyle swimming @1:00

Advertising

  • 8 = number of repetitions
  • 50 = distance covered per rep
  • @1:00 = the interval per rep

Here are some of the common terms you will see scrawled up on the whiteboard in addition to the sets:

Bilateral breathing: This means that swimmers breathe to both sides during freestyle. To breathe bilaterally, you would take a breath after every 3 strokes, for instance.

EZ: Shorthand for “easy.”

Negative split: Come back faster on the second half of the rep. If you swim :31 seconds for the first 50 of a 100, the goal would be to swim :30 seconds or faster on the second 50.

Advertising

Even Pace/Split: The goal here is to swim the first half and the second half of the repetition at the same speed.

Stroke: A majority of swim sets are performed in freestyle (or front crawl). When “stroke” is listed in the set, this means to do any of the other three strokes (butterfly, backstroke, or breaststroke).

Distance Per Stroke (DPS): The goal here is to maximize length with each stroke without over-gliding.

Kick (sometimes just “K”): This is when you use a kickboard (or in a streamline on your back for backstrokers) and perform kick with a board.

Advertising

Pull (or “P”): Know that pull buoy that coach had you grab from the equipment bin? Throw it between your legs (between your thighs — not your ankles) and let your arms and shoulders do all the work.

Getting Faster

Swimming is a highly technical sport. The importance of technique is hard to overstate. When we watch swimmers like Ledecky and Phelps, it’s not just their conditioning that allows them to overtake the rest of the world — it’s their ability to swim faster with less exertion than the competition.

Keep this in mind as you are improving and getting a better feel for the water. If you are serious about wanting to get faster in the pool, you need to pay equal attention to swimming better and faster.

Featured photo credit: Flickr via flickr.com

More by this author

How to Pick the Perfect Set of Swim Goggles 5 Benefits a Food Journal The Shocking Power of Prepping Your Meals 4 Cool Things That Happen When You Start Journaling Your Workouts How to Set Goals Like Katie Ledecky

Trending in Exercise

1 8 Yoga Poses to Help You Achieve Strong and Toned Inner Thighs 2 5 Breathing Exercises for Anxiety (Simple and Calm Anxiety Quickly) 3 3 Home Exercises To Fix Your Rounded Shoulders In One Month 4 Workout Every Day: Thursday Music Playlist 5 Cut down on drinking! Time for a post-holiday detox

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on September 29, 2020

Does Keto Weight Loss Diet Plan Actually Work?

Does Keto Weight Loss Diet Plan Actually Work?

In the past few years, more and more people have started to suffer from obesity, with associated heart and metabolic problems. If you are struggling to keep your weight under control, you are also probably worrying about additional problems such as hypertension and diabetes.

People who fight weight gain have indeed a genetic predisposition, but they also need to make a few lifestyle changes, especially with regard to their lifestyle and caloric intake. It has been demonstrated that regular physical activity, as well as dietary habits can promote weight loss and allow one to maintain the same weight on a regular basis.

In this article, we will look into the commonly known keto weight loss diet and explain to you whether it works or not.

What Is the Ketogenic Diet?

The ketogenic diet has been presented as one of the most effective approaches for quick weight loss.[1] Indeed, this nutritional approach has a solid basis, allowing one to lose excess pounds and return to a healthy figure. And as you will see for yourself, it can even improve cardiovascular health.

The main idea behind this diet is to drastically reduce the carb intake, so the body begins to use the ketone bodies produced by the liver as energy. As the glucose levels decrease and the fuel for the body changes, significant weight loss will occur.

This condition was first noticed in individuals who were fasting; at the beginning, the ketogenic diet was used for those who suffered from epilepsy. It was only recently that researchers began to recommend it for weight loss purposes.

Benefits of the Ketogenic Diet

It has been confirmed that this dietary approach can help one fight obesity, as well as high cholesterol levels. It can improve cardiovascular risk factors, protecting one against stroke and atherosclerosis.

Advertising

You might not be aware of this for a fact but the ketogenic diet can suppress the appetite. This is related to the fact that one consumes more proteins, which have a higher satiety effect.

It is also worth mentioning that such changes can keep the appetite control hormones in check. Proteins have a thermal effect, contributing to the activation of the metabolism.

Ketone bodies cause a number of changes within the body, contributing to the suppression of the appetite in a direct manner. They prevent the body from storing fat, while activating the metabolism and promoting the fat-burning process. Thus, one experiences a higher metabolic efficiency, consuming more calories in the process.

When formulating the best diet plan, you have to consider the ketogenic diet among your first options.[2] Keep in mind that this diet can help you lose excess weight and offer a wide range of other benefits.

For example, the ketone bodies produced in the liver can provide protection against cognitive impairment (associated with weight gain and obesity in general). The dietary approach can reduce the risk of cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and epilepsy.

It can even be of use to those who suffer from Parkinson’s disease and it facilitates recovery in patients diagnosed with brain injuries. The ketogenic diet does wonders for those with polycystic ovary syndrome and acne; this is related to the reduction in insulin levels.

The Physiological Changes Associated with This Diet

What happens is that, upon reducing the carb intake, a metabolic condition known as physiological ketosis occurs.[3] This is when the body runs out of glucose, using ketone bodies (resulted through ketogenesis). When these began to be used as energy, weight loss occurs as a natural consequence.

Advertising

As the glycemic level begins to stabilize, the weight loss process occurs. The risk of metabolic syndrome is reduced, which increases the life expectancy for the person in question. The bad cholesterol level is reduced and so is the one of triglycerides (associated risk of cardiovascular disease).

The metabolic rate is altered and physiological changes occur. While the lean body mass is preserved, the fat mass begins to be consumed and weight loss is no longer difficult. Interestingly, all of these changes do not have a negative effect on the metabolism of glucose (eliminating of insulin resistance).

What Happens When You Consume Carbs in High Quantities

Unfortunately, the modern diet is associated with a high consumption of carbs. The rates of obesity have increased only in the past few years, when more and more people have fallen prey into the trap of carbs.

The excessive intake of carbohydrates can lead to weight gain and obesity in most cases. A diet rich in carbs has a negative influence on the insulin resistance. Moreover, it increases glucose levels and reduces the level of good cholesterol.

All of these changes translate into a higher risk of diabetes and heart problems, as the metabolism is disturbed.

How It Feels to Follow the Keto Approach

The reduction of carb intake, associated with a higher consumption of proteins, has proven to be quite beneficial (both physically and mentally). The sensation of lethargy, normally caused by the increased carb intake, disappears and the mood improves.

At the beginning, one might have difficulties reducing the carb intake. However, as the body accustoms to these dietary changes, the sensation of hunger disappears and one is less tempted to give into cravings. As the fat metabolism is improved, one begins to notice the weight difference and feel better overall.

Advertising

Tips for Successful Weight Loss

When it comes to weight loss tips to remember, this is the most important one:[4]

You need to make sure that your daily carb intake does not exceed 20 grams, regardless of how much fat or proteins you plan on consuming that day. The intake of carbs should not be influenced by the total caloric intake.

The transition from your regular diet to the ketogenic approach should not take place all of a sudden. You need to take a gradual approach, so that your body has the necessary amount of time to adapt to the new diet.

In order to facilitate this transition, you can opt for meals that mimic regular, carb-rich foods. These will help you stay on the diet and achieve your weight loss goals, without too much effort.

What Foods Are Allowed to Eat?

If you have decided to go on the ketogenic diet, you need to up your protein intake. You are allowed to consume lean meat, such chicken, eggs and dairy products, such as full-fat cheese. Fatty fish, such as tuna and sardines, as well as seafood is allowed.

You can also consume olive oil and flax seed oil as these deliver beneficial fats to the body. Vegetables such as spinach, cucumber, lettuce, celery, cauliflower, eggplants and carrots are allowed. As for fruits, you can consume berries of various kinds, citrus fruits, tomatoes and avocados.

Do not be afraid to consume olive oil of good quality as this is one of the best food products for someone who is on a weight loss diet. In the Mediterranean area, olive oil is eaten in generous quantities and the people here do not suffer from obesity (also have a reduced risk of heart problems).

Advertising

What Foods Are Restricted?

Simply put, you need to drastically reduce the carb intake. This means that you should eat white flour products, potatoes and pasta as little as possible. The same goes for bread and rice.

It is important to be aware of the fact that carbs are found in other food products, especially in sweets. Stay away from sweets, cakes and other similar items that are rich in sugar. Of course, fruit juices and soft drinks are on the no list.

The Truth: Does the Ketogenic Diet Actually Promote Weight Loss?

In the introduction, we have talked about obesity and the risks associated with weight gain. The ketogenic diet can reverse such changes, allowing one to keep the hunger sensation under control and reduce the intake of food.

Proteins are a big part of this dietary approach, offering a prolonged satiety sensation. On the other hand, both carbs and fat are less filling, causing one to feel hungry quicker.

As one begins to consume more proteins, the sensation of hunger appears at longer intervals. The ketogenic diet will not cause one to feel hungry all the time, presented a higher success rate than other dietary approaches.

As the carb intake is reduced to the lowest possible level, the ketogenic state will occur and the body will no longer rely on glucose for fuel. The ketone bodies produced in the liver, from the fat reserves, will act as fuel.

It is important to understand that the body needs time to adapt to the state of ketosis. You need to pursue the dietary approach and not be satisfied with the initial weight loss, which is due to the diuresis process. Soon, you will see that your body has begun to burn fat efficiently, allowing you to return to a healthy figure.

The ketogenic diet presents a number of advantages, starting with the fact that you have plenty of allowed foods to organize your daily meals. Moreover, you can follow this diet, without having to count calories or keep track of how much food you have eaten.

More Weight Loss Tips

Featured photo credit: Khamkhor via unsplash.com

Reference

Read Next