Advertising
Advertising

5 Positive Behavior Changes That Result From Traveling

5 Positive Behavior Changes That Result From Traveling

Have you ever traveled to a place where you have never been and came back a different person?  Let’s put this way, that traveling is a movement to a certain location without big expectations and a behavior change is a shift from one state to another. Think about it, how many times your state shifts (emotions, feelings, thoughts, actions) during the travel. I guess, numerous, but few of those shifts remain with you after coming back.

One study found that after traveling people became happier about their work. Traveling inspired them to work harder and earn more money for their next vacation trip. That is an obviously positive impact to the labor market. Nonetheless, something extraordinary happens to you personally, so you benefit. The next time, observe yourself on these states.

Advertising

1. You Become More Passionate

Passion for exploring, to try and sponge experiences during and after the trip. This happens at those moments when we are double happy, excited  and thrilled because we are in the moment. Those moments are created during the travel and stay for a period we allow them to stay. Travel passion can easily be incorporated into our daily routine. Yes, a routine can be made passionate by doing ordinary things in extraordinary ways. Imagine if you do accounting or a sales pitch that brings tension, but adding passion to the process is like doubling happiness, so the outcome and the progress will increase. It’s a matter to catch the motion.

2. Curiosity Leads to New Beginnings

Curiosity is about to try and change status quo, innovate on the move. Curiosity is the outcome of passion. Well, we are naturally curious about trends, tastes and smells, and we immediately we want to try things out. Exploring the new possibilities may bring us to new passions, hobbies, relationships. A brand new look to ordinary things in life is applicable and transforming when new experiences appear. With that curiosity, we tend to create a new beginning to our life.

Advertising

giphy

    3. You Become More Confident

    Openness is the great virtue of never being the same. It demolishes any walls and bricks even if you are visiting the Great Wall of China. It gives a positive impact to connecting with yourself and others. Think for a moment of your best experience that led you to satisfaction. Allowing yourself to step in into the zone of vulnerability or unknown helps us when we are back to real life. The comfort zone is the territory where we are comfortable. Overcoming it builds confidence and creativity.

    Advertising

    4. You Become More Creativity

    Creativity is a skill that we develop during any travel we take. Most of us absorb the environment via eyes, emotions and relationship. Creativity may be defined as quality and it is an attitude. We clearly know the unspoken that this “thing” will be awesome, because we have that secret feeling that guides us to the next step. In reality, each trip has its own emotions and bits of charm that we want to keep and implement after coming back. Creativity blinks  in our eyes, stimulated by a passion from the heart and when it connects the dots, an everlasting effect emerges.

    5. You Develop Continuity

    Continuity to explore new places increases the appetite for traveling. Continuity is not the goal by itself to keep the travel longer, it is more a process to keep the treasures of the journey more alive. It pays as a magic, it brings momentum, it taps into the real you. Continuity is a quality of something that does not stop or change as time passes. However being a real time one, it does, it passes or changes depending the meaning we give. But travel may finish, the destination may be reached, however, the experience and memories remain, and even more, it boosts to repeat over and over again, so it lasts, it continues.  As once started, never to be same.

    Advertising

    tumblr_mmt7rfNBek1rotbnro1_500

      Considering all that is mentioned above, it works with one simple strategy: that we allow ourselves to experience the moment fully, to accept and spread it. Continue to travel and be extraordinary, because behavior change is a shift from one state to another, like travel: from point A to B.

      Featured photo credit: theblogabroad.com via theblogabroad.com

      More by this author

      Loreta Pivoriunaite

      Life scientist, Coach

      Feeling Frustrated at Work? Signs Telling That Your Boss Is the Culprit Multitasking is Failing: How to Stay Connected 5 Positive Behavior Changes That Result From Traveling affirmation goal 3 Strategic Statements for Goal Setting and a New life 3 Ways To Use Traveling As A Self Coaching Session

      Trending in Brain

      1 How to Memorize a Speech the Smart Way 2 How to Improve Memory: 7 Natural (And Highly Effective) Ways 3 11 Tactics on Increasing Brain Power, Memory, and Motivation 4 How to Increase Brain Power, Boost Memory and Become 10X Smarter 5 How to Improve Brain Memory Naturally: Foods to Eat And Skip

      Read Next

      Advertising
      Advertising
      Advertising

      Last Updated on November 5, 2019

      How to Memorize a Speech the Smart Way

      How to Memorize a Speech the Smart Way

      Did you know that 75% of the population suffers from glossophobia? That scary sounding word is one of the most common phobia’s in the world, fear of public speaking.

      I’ll bet even as you are reading this, you are getting nervous thinking about giving a speech.

      I have got good news for you. In this article, I will share with you a step by step method on how to memorize a speech the smart way. Once you have this method down, your confidence in yourself to deliver a successful speech will increase substantially. Read on to feel well prepared the next time you have to memorize and deliver a speech.

      Common Mistakes of Memorizing a Speech

      Before we get to the actual process of how to memorize a speech the smart way, let’s look at the two most common mistakes many of us tend to make while preparing for a speech.

      Complete Memorization

      In an attempt to ensure they remember every detail, many people aim to completely memorize their speech. They practice it over and over until they have every single word burned into their brain.

      In many ways, this is understandable because most of us are naturally frightened of having to give a speech. When the time comes, we want to be completely and totally prepared and not make any mistakes.

      While this makes a lot of sense, it also comes with its own negative side. The downside to having your speech memorized word for word is that you sound like a robot when delivering the speech. You become so focused on remembering every single part that you lose the ability to inflect your speech to varying degrees, and free form the talk a bit when the situation warrants.

      Lack of Preparation

      The other side of the coin to complete memorization is people who don’t prepare enough. Because they don’t want to come off sounding like a robot, they decide they will mostly “wing it”.

      Sometimes they will write a few main points down on a piece of paper to remind themselves. They figure once they get going, the details will somehow fill themselves in under the big talking points while they are doing the talking.

      The problem is that unless this is a topic you know inside and out and have spoken on it many times, you’ll wind up missing key points. It’s almost a given that as soon as you are done with your speech, you’ll remember many things you should have brought up while talking.

      Advertising

      There’s a good balance to be had between over and under preparing. Let’s now look at how to memorize a speech the smart way.

      How to Memorize a Speech (Step-by-Step Guide)

      1. Write Out Your Speech

      The first step in the process is to simply write out your speech.

      Many people like to write out the entire speech. Other people are more inclined to write their speech outline style. Whichever way your brain works best is the way you should write your speech.

      Personally, I like to break things down into the primary points I want to make, and then back up each major point with several details. Because my mind works this way, I tend to write out speeches, and articles for that matter, by doing an outline.

      Once I have the outline completed, I will then fill in several bullet points to back up each big topic.

      For instance, if I was going to give a speech on how to get in better shape my outline would look something like this:

      Benefits of being in shape

      • Point #1
      • Point #2
      • Point #3

      Exercise

      • Point #1
      • Point #2
      • Point #3

      Diet

      • Point #1
      • Point #2
      • Point #3

      Rest and hydration

      Advertising

      • Point #1
      • Point #2
      • Point #3

      ConclusionNo need for points here, just a few sentences wrapping things up.

      As you might imagine, this step typically is the hardest because it’s not only the first step but it also involves the initial creation of the speech.

      2. Rehearse Your Speech

      Now that you’ve written your speech, or outline, it’s time to start saying it out loud. It’s completely fine to simply read what you’ve written line by line at this point. What you are working on doing is getting the outline and getting a feel for the speech.

      If you’ve written the entire speech out, you’ll be editing it while you are rehearsing it. Many times as we say things out loud, we realize that what we wrote needs to be changed and altered. This is how we work towards having a well rounded and smooth speech. Feel free to change things as needed while you are rehearsing your speech.

      If you are like me and you’ve written the outline, this is where some of the supporting bullet points will begin to come out. Normally, I will have written several bullet points under each main topic. But as I say it out loud, I will begin to fill in more and more details. I might scratch certain bullet points and add others. I might think of something new at this stage while I am listening to myself and want to add it.

      The key to remember here is that you laying the foundation for your awesome speech. At this point, it’s a work in progress, you are getting the key pieces in place.

      3. Memorize the Bigger Parts

      As you are rehearsing your speech, you want to focus on memorizing the bigger parts, or the main points.

      Going back to my example of how to get in better shape, I’d want to ensure I have memorized my primary points. These include the benefits of being in shape, exercise, diet, rest and hydration, and the conclusion. These are the main points I want to make and I will then fill in further details. I’ve got to ensure I know these very well first and foremost.

      By practicing your major points, you are building the framework for your speech. After you have this solid outline in place, you’ll continue by adding in the details to round things out.

      4. Fill In the Details

      Now that you have the big chunks memorized, it’s time to work on memorizing the details. These detail points will provide support and context for your major points. You can work on this all at once or break it down to the details that support each major point.

      Advertising

      For example, the details I might have under the “exercise” big point might include such things as cardio, weights, how many times a week to exercise, how long to actually exercise, and several examples of actual exercises. In this example, I have 5 detail points to memorize to support my major point of “exercise”.

      It’s a good idea to test yourself regularly as you are rehearsing your speech. Ask yourself:

      What are the 5 detail points I want to talk about that support my 3rd main point?

      You need to be able to fire those off quickly. Until you can do this, you won’t be able to associate each of the details with the main point.

      You have to be able to have them grouped together in your mind so that it comes out naturally in your speech. So that when you think of main point #2, you automatically think of the 4 supporting details associated with it.

      Keep working at this stage until you can run through your speech completely several times and remember all of your big points and the supporting details.

      Once you can do that with relative ease, it will be time for the final step, working on your delivery.

      5. Work on Your Delivery

      You’ve got the bulk of the work done now. You’ve written your speech and rehearsed enough times to have not only your main points memorized but also your supporting details. In short, you should have your speech almost done.

      There’s one more step in how to memorize a speech the smart way. The final component is to work on how you deliver your speech.

      For the most part, you can go give your speech now. After all, you have it memorized. If you want to ensure you do it right, you’ll want to hone how you are delivering your speech.

      Advertising

      You work on your delivery by rehearsing and running through it a number of times and making tweaks along the way. These tweaks or changes may be are’s where you’d want to pause for effect.

      If you’ve found you have used one word 5 times in one paragraph, you might want to swap it out for a similar word a few times to keep it fresh.

      Sometimes while working on this part, I’ve thought of a great story that’s happened to me that I can incorporate to make my point even better.

      When you work on your delivery, you are basically giving your speech a personality as well.

      The Bottom Line

      And there you have it, a step by step approach on how to memorize a speech the smart way.

      The next time you are asked to give a speech don’t let glossophobia rear its familiar head. Instead, remember this easy to use guide to help craft a powerful speech.

      Using the method shown here will help you deliver your next speech with increased confidence.

      More About Public Speaking

      Featured photo credit: Anna Sullivan via unsplash.com

      Read Next