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5 Things You Need to Know About Indoor Cycling

5 Things You Need to Know About Indoor Cycling

Cycling is one of the best workouts you can do, but few people are willing to get out with their bikes under cold rain or hot sun. Luckily, we have establishments where stationary spinning bikes await for us to exercise on any weather, while listening to the coach and some pumping tune.

Indoor cycling or spinning (which is in fact a trademark term) was invented in the 1990s and now it’s a worldwide phenomenon, which helps women like you and me lose pounds and build up some muscles. Indoor cycling is very effective, as it’s a low impact workout, compared to running, for example, yet it provides you with an intense cardio session. Depending on your fitness level, you decide how intense your cycling session will be, but you can be sure your lungs will be working, your heart will be pumping, and your glutes, hamstrings, quads, core, and calves are going to scream.

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Despite this indoor cycling is a very popular thing, there are many secrets you don’t know about it. For a beginner, even the lingo can get intimidating, so here are all the things you need to know about indoor cycling.

1. Pay attention when you pick your seat.

Newbies are going to run to the last row of the bikes, but this is not a great way to tackle indoor cycling. You should be reserving a bike in the first row, where you can see your instructor. This way, he can advise if you are not moving right and you can get more motivation from his pace.

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However, if you don’t manage to find a seat in the front row, check if the studio has a tiered seating, which can offer a 360 degree perspective for those sitting in the back row.

2. Learn the lingo of indoor cycling.

There are couple of differences between the indoor bikes and the outdoor bikes, the most noticeable being the lack of gears for the first ones. Instead of gears, indoor bikes have resistance knobs, which control your RPM. Then, there is the Q factor, which helps the biker make sure the rotation is correct – yes, there is such thing as a wrong rotation during cycling. And there are many more things to consider. So, first, inform yourself on what each thing means and then head to the gym.

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For example, the RPM should be seen as a road: the higher the RPM, the road is uphill, the lower, the road is downhill. As you see, make correlations with daily things in order to remember all the lingo.

3. Get used with the clip in and clip out.

When you are cycling, clipping in helps you focus more on the pull, because your feet stay in place as you cycle. When you are wearing regular shoes, to clip in, just place the ball of the foot in the cage of the pedal. If you are wearing special cycling shoes, just clip one foot at a time, by putting the toes in a downward angle on the pedal, then pushing the foot until you hear the shoe is locked in, just like you would do with your sky equipment.

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To unclip, turn your show away from the bike, forcing it out. You might not manage to do it from the first time, but don’t panic, just repeat until you manage to unclip.

4. Work more on pulling up your feet.

Most cyclists focus on pushing the pedal, but the real work is done when you are pulling up, because this is when you are building momentum and increase your RPM. Concentrate on the upstroke, for a more effective cycling session.

5. It’s all about yourself.

The best thing about cycling classes is it’s all about yourself. As soon as the lights dim and the music turns on, you are alone with your bike. Focus on yourself and allow your mind to empty, as you follow the rhythm of the music. You can even close your eyes and pedal, listening to the instructor and the music.

Featured photo credit: Global Panorama/Flickr via flickr.com

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Published on June 7, 2019

10 Lower Body Workouts Anyone Can Try at Home

10 Lower Body Workouts Anyone Can Try at Home

Having a hard time going to the gym? Fear no more!

In this article, we’ll be breaking down 10 in home lower body workouts anyone can try at home and their exercises. No gear needed for these workouts, just some space and a cup water waiting for your disposal.

There’re 3 main parts in this article:

If you’re familiar with the basic lower body exercises, just get into the first section 10 Lower Body Workouts That Can Be Done Anywhere right away.

If you want more guidance on the basics, check out the second section Lower Body Exercises Breakdown.

And the last section is about what you should do before and after working out.

10 Lower Body Workouts That Can Be Done Anywhere

If you’re familiar with the basic lower body exercises, just read on this section.

If you’d like to have more guidance on each exercise listed in these 10 workouts, take a look at the following part Lower Body Exercises Breakdown.

1. The Starter Workout

3 sets of 8-12 reps of:

  • Squat
  • Single Leg Deadlift
  • Glute Bridge

(30 sec to 2 min rest in between each set)

2. The 7 Minute Workout

3 rounds of 30 seconds of each exercise:

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  • Walking Lunges
  • Quarter Squat
  • Step Up
  • Single Leg Deadlift

(1 min rest in between each round)

3. The Unilateral Workout

4 sets of 16 reps of:

  • Reverse Lunges
  • Single Leg Deadlift
  • Skater Squat
  • Single Leg Glute Bridge

(30 sec to 1 min rest in between each set)

4. The Endurance Workout

2 sets of 20-50 reps of:

  • Squat
  • Walking Lunge
  • Single Leg Deadlift
  • Glute Bridge

(1-2 min rest in between each set)

5. The Back To Back Lower Body Workout

5 rounds of 10 to 20 seconds of each exercise:

  • Skater Squat
  • Step Up
  • Single Leg Deadlift
  • Single Leg Glute Bridge
  • Quarter Squat

(30 min rest in between each round)

6. Strength Lower Body Workout

5 to 10 sets of 4 reps of:

  • Walking Lunge
  • Single Leg Deadlift
  • Squat

(30 sec to 2 mins of rest time in between set)

7. Glute Burner Workout

4 sets of 10-30 reps of:

  • Walking Lunge
  • Single Leg Deadlift
  • Single Leg Glute Bridge
  • Quarter Squat

(1 min of rest time in between set)

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8. The Advance Lower Body Workout

3 rounds of 20 seconds of:

  • Squat
  • Walking Lunge
  • Skater Squat
  • Reverse Lunge
  • Glute Bridge
  • Single Leg Deadlift

(2 mins of rest time in between set)

9. The Quick Lower Body Workout

2 sets of 10 reps of:

  • Reverse Lunge
  • Step Up
  • Single Leg Deadlift

10. The 100 Repetition Challenge

2 sets of 50 reps on each leg of:

  • Walking Lunge
  • Single Leg Deadlift

(4 mins of rest time in between set)

Lower Body Exercises Breakdown

Here’s the breakdown of the lower body exercises[1] that you found in the workouts listed in the first section of this article.

1. Squat

    A squat is a compound movement which entails the recruitment of a majority of your lower body (quadriceps, hamstrings, gluteal muscles, spinal erectors).

    How to squat:

    Feet shoulder width apart or a little wider. Toes pointed slightly out, arms out in front of you. Sit into your heels till you hit parallel with your butt and knee, drive through the heels, return to starting position and repeat.

    2. Walking Lunges

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      A lunge is a complex movement which recruits mainly the lower body.

      The walking lunges are a harder version of a split squat which is stationary and then adds the component of stepping and keeping balance which engages the gluteus medius as well as allowing a larger range of motion.

      3. Reverse Lunge

        A reverse lunge is very similar to the split squat but instead, after every rep, you are returning to the starting position and stepping back.

        By reverse stepping, you are allowing for a better emphasis on the hamstrings and gluteal muscles as opposed to the quadriceps muscles in a forward stepping lunge.

        4. Quarter Squat

          A quarter squat is the top ¼ movement of a squat. This will work mainly the gluteal muscles as it emphasizes the hip extension and not a lot of range of motion on the quadriceps muscles.

          5. Skater Squat

            A skater squat is a unilateral variation of the squat, this squat really engages the gluteus medius and hamstrings as it works unilateral stability and hip flexion which fires both the hamstrings and glutes.

            6. Step Up

              The Step Up is the greatest balance of getting the glutes and quadriceps muscles firing. Doing Step Ups will not only get the glutes going, but the quadriceps as well.

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              7. Glute Bridge

                Glute Bridges are a great way to nearly isolate the glutes and build a great butt. This entire movement works through hip extension which the main movement of the gluteal muscles.

                8. Single Leg Glute Bridge

                  Single leg glute bridge ensures that we are evenly building the glutes and not relying too heavily on our dominant leg and symmetrical butt. The step up can be done in a chair or a step in the stairs

                  9. Single Leg Deadlift

                    Single Leg RDL’s engage that entire booty and hamstrings, especially the gluteus medius due to its unilateral stability property. This is a great way to spice up some routine deadlifts.

                    Before & After Working Out

                    Before engaging in any physical activity, consult a doctor if you have not worked out in years. However, if you want to go at it without consulting a doctor, start slow and build your way up. Even though it’s home workout, use dynamic stretching or some light jogging[2] as a warm up before starting the lower body workouts.

                    Finally, at the end of the lower body workout, use static stretching to reduce injuries and to calm down your heart rate gradually.

                    Featured photo credit: Gesina Kunkel via unsplash.com

                    Reference

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