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5 Things You Need to Know About Indoor Cycling

5 Things You Need to Know About Indoor Cycling

Cycling is one of the best workouts you can do, but few people are willing to get out with their bikes under cold rain or hot sun. Luckily, we have establishments where stationary spinning bikes await for us to exercise on any weather, while listening to the coach and some pumping tune.

Indoor cycling or spinning (which is in fact a trademark term) was invented in the 1990s and now it’s a worldwide phenomenon, which helps women like you and me lose pounds and build up some muscles. Indoor cycling is very effective, as it’s a low impact workout, compared to running, for example, yet it provides you with an intense cardio session. Depending on your fitness level, you decide how intense your cycling session will be, but you can be sure your lungs will be working, your heart will be pumping, and your glutes, hamstrings, quads, core, and calves are going to scream.

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Despite this indoor cycling is a very popular thing, there are many secrets you don’t know about it. For a beginner, even the lingo can get intimidating, so here are all the things you need to know about indoor cycling.

1. Pay attention when you pick your seat.

Newbies are going to run to the last row of the bikes, but this is not a great way to tackle indoor cycling. You should be reserving a bike in the first row, where you can see your instructor. This way, he can advise if you are not moving right and you can get more motivation from his pace.

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However, if you don’t manage to find a seat in the front row, check if the studio has a tiered seating, which can offer a 360 degree perspective for those sitting in the back row.

2. Learn the lingo of indoor cycling.

There are couple of differences between the indoor bikes and the outdoor bikes, the most noticeable being the lack of gears for the first ones. Instead of gears, indoor bikes have resistance knobs, which control your RPM. Then, there is the Q factor, which helps the biker make sure the rotation is correct – yes, there is such thing as a wrong rotation during cycling. And there are many more things to consider. So, first, inform yourself on what each thing means and then head to the gym.

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For example, the RPM should be seen as a road: the higher the RPM, the road is uphill, the lower, the road is downhill. As you see, make correlations with daily things in order to remember all the lingo.

3. Get used with the clip in and clip out.

When you are cycling, clipping in helps you focus more on the pull, because your feet stay in place as you cycle. When you are wearing regular shoes, to clip in, just place the ball of the foot in the cage of the pedal. If you are wearing special cycling shoes, just clip one foot at a time, by putting the toes in a downward angle on the pedal, then pushing the foot until you hear the shoe is locked in, just like you would do with your sky equipment.

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To unclip, turn your show away from the bike, forcing it out. You might not manage to do it from the first time, but don’t panic, just repeat until you manage to unclip.

4. Work more on pulling up your feet.

Most cyclists focus on pushing the pedal, but the real work is done when you are pulling up, because this is when you are building momentum and increase your RPM. Concentrate on the upstroke, for a more effective cycling session.

5. It’s all about yourself.

The best thing about cycling classes is it’s all about yourself. As soon as the lights dim and the music turns on, you are alone with your bike. Focus on yourself and allow your mind to empty, as you follow the rhythm of the music. You can even close your eyes and pedal, listening to the instructor and the music.

Featured photo credit: Global Panorama/Flickr via flickr.com

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Last Updated on August 15, 2018

The Biggest Myth Debunked: The More Protein You Eat, the Faster You Build Muscles?

The Biggest Myth Debunked: The More Protein You Eat, the Faster You Build Muscles?

Some years ago I gulped down at least 2-3 unflavoured, whey protein shakes a day, while eating multiple chicken breasts. I thought protein was the holy grail when it comes to muscle growth. Yet I didn’t see the results that I truly wanted in the gym. Instead I was feeling low on energy and bloated.

People training in the gym often consume tons of protein because they expect it to be converted into muscles. Yet the effectiveness of excess protein intake, especially protein shakes has never been scientifically proven. If you drink protein shakes regularly, it’s very likely that you’re taking in more protein than you should.

Video Summary

Will Protein Be Converted To Muscles?

The biggest misconception there is on protein, is that muscles consist entirely of it. This isn’t true.

Muscles consist of protein, yes. But only a fraction of your muscles, approximately 20%, actually is protein. The other 80% are made up of different components, mostly water.

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    You don’t need to consume as much protein as you think you do. Let me show you that with a simple calculation:

    In my multiple years as a trainer, I seldom saw an increase in raw muscles more than 5 kilograms in a year. Even for beginners. This is not because I’m a bad trainer, no, this is just the hard truth for natural athletes. There’s a lot of deceptive marketing out there. Don’t believe it. When I started training in the gym I started to look pretty massive after one year of training and gained multiple kilograms, but it was never, never more than 5 kilograms of raw muscle in a single year.

    To continue the math and show you how much protein you would need for that natural muscle gain:

    One-fifth of those 5 kilograms is 1 kilogram. 1 kilogram of raw protein that your muscles would actually need. If you divide that one kilogram of protein again through 365 (amount of the days in a year), you get only a few grams. In fact it is a one-digit figure. This results to only a few grams that you would need to eat extra in a day, to guarantee muscle growth.

    You need way less protein than you think you need. All the excess protein that you will consume, will be converted to fat and stored in fat cells.

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    How Much Protein Do You Really Need?

    You’re more likely to suffer from protein excess, than deficiency. If you eat sufficient calories in your daily life, you will not be protein deficient.[1]

    I myself strive to consume about 1.3 grams of protein per kilogram of bodyweight. Which might even be too much scientifically speaking, yet moderately higher levels of protein intake are still considered safe.

    Unbiased studies recommend consuming about 0.8 to 0.9 grams of protein per day, if you’re an adult. Most people may even need protein intakes of only 0.6 grams of protein per day, but the recommendation’s aim is to cover most of the bell curve. Experienced athletes may even need less than that, according to some studies, as their body is better able to make use of the protein that they actually consume.

    Once I’ve made that switch to a lower protein diet, I’ve actually experienced less fatigue and more energy in the gym and in my life.

    The Downsides Of Protein Excess

    Protein can do more harm than good. I’ve heard this sentence from my mother many times over, back when I was still drinking frequent protein shakes. I ignored it when I was younger and thought my mother was crazy, yet she still had a decent point.

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    Our current protein focused diet in the western world is promoting hyperfiltration of your kidneys. This increases the workload of your kidneys and therefore increases the stress that you put on that organ. Too much protein in your diet also diminishes the blood flow of your filtration helper and may even leak protein in your urine.[2] Long-term high protein diets may therefore lead to kidney problems. There is also a linkage to increased cancer risk, liver malfunction, and worsening of coronary artery disease.[3]

      Not All Protein Is Created Equal

      There is a guy training in the fitness center that I’m a fitness manager in. He’s a really friendly guy, but suffers from severe kidney problems.

      I recently discussed his workout and nutrition regime with him, so I might give him some additional advice on how to better his condition. I advised him on cutting back his protein shakes and animal protein intake as meat and dairy can lead to an inflammatory response in his body.[4] He’s consuming a lot of protein on a regular basis.

      Sadly he refused to listen to my advice and told me, that his doctors recommended him to keep following his regular diet plan. They told him that altering one’s nutrition doesn’t make a big difference anyway. Tip: If your doctor tells you that, you must change your doctor as soon as possible.

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      Some weeks later, after our workout session, he told me about his holidays with his family. And how he needed to cancel them in the last minute, because he was suffering yet again from intense stomach pains. He had to undergo operation that same day to ease the pain. It was his second alarming operation this year.[5]

      Focus on a plant-based, unprocessed protein source. Such as beans, legumes, seeds and nuts in your diet.

      What To Do Now

      If you drink a protein shake every day, ask yourself: Is this truly working? If not, it may be the time to let go of some of your precious beliefs.

      Consume a plant-based protein shake if you actually like the taste of it. If not, throw it away and don’t waste your money on that beverage ever again.[6]

      Don’t stress protein out too much in your diet. If you don’t like gulping down pounds of lowfat-quark, don’t do it. The extra protein in that food won’t make your muscles pop out. I’ve been there. I was that weird guy that was eating nearly a kilogram of low-fat quark in the morning at 5am after going out, to preserve my muscles. It wasn’t worth it.

      You should take a sincere look at your protein consumption and ask yourself: Am I truly enjoying the excess protein that I put in my body? If not, you should let it go. It isn’t necessary and may even be unhealthy in the long run.

      You have to realize that supplement companies are marketing companies. Ignore those supplements for the beginning and focus on whole foods. Most people in the US are deficient in fiber and antioxidants. A deficiency that can be fatal. It is time to put more fruits and vegetables in your diet and not worry about protein deficiency.

      Reference

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