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The Beginners’ Guide To Playing Golf

The Beginners’ Guide To Playing Golf

The perfect weekend is about to end with a victory. You’re concentrating, eyes on the ball. The eighth hole is the toughest one, and you’re about to finalize the score and win the day.

You take a deep breath, relax, and launch the ball in the hole’s direction.

Everybody on the field looks into the sky, in the direction of the shot. Will it hit the target? Will you win?

The joy and fulfillment of playing golf were considered as a thing for elderly people until recently when the sport gained some serious traction. The global recognition came with the Big League and World Cups, and the best players have earned respect and big money.

Interest in the game of golf is on the rise, and I’ve decided to bring it closer to you. You can cover the basics quickly, but mastering the game won’t be easy.

Let’s get into the world of golf.

Basic Rules

rules

    Golf is a game played by several players, where you try to hit the ball with the particular club, forcing it into a hole strategically placed on the terrain. The player who scores with the least amount of swings wins. Each player must have his bag of clubs and a scorecard. For transportation throughout the terrain, special vehicles called golf carts are used. Players take turns swinging the ball.

    Before you start your round, make sure to read the local rules on the score card. During the round, don’t ask anyone for, and do not give advice to anyone except your partner.

    When playing golf, you should know that there is one basic rule called “loose impediments.” If you are playing golf by this rule, then you are allowed to move natural objects like branches, leaves, and other stuff that are preventing you from making a perfect hit.

    Some rules allow you to move your ball in particular conditions (i.e. If your ball gets into the bulky grass, stuck in mud or a small pond). Sometimes, you can move your ball from the wrong position without getting a penalty. For example, if your ball got stuck in some form of man-made obstruction, then you are allowed to move it and continue playing.

    Types of Penalties

    penalties

      For not abiding by the rules, you might get penalized, and here are the most common penalties:

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      More clubs in the bag than allowed: You have to select your clubs before the round starts, and you can’t have more than 14. Breaking this rule will get you a penalty of deducting holes from your score.

      A wrong score on the scorecard: If you misrecord a score as better than the actual score, you get disqualified. Simple as that. No cheating allowed.

      Grounding the club in a hazard: Your club can’t touch the ground before hitting the ball. The penalty for this is an addition of two strokes to the score.

      Water hazard: When your ball lands in water, you can try to play it without penalty, which is extremely difficult. If not, you can remove the ball from water to its original place and replay the stroke as a new one while adding a stroke to the score, or drop the ball somewhere near the water and continue, with the addition of one stroke.

      Ball lost or out of bounds: By losing the ball, you will instantly get a stroke plus additional distance penalty. This means that you will have one swing less to complete the hole, and you will have to go back to the previous place and re-play.

      Ball unplayable: You can call your ball unplayable anywhere except in the water hazard. If you want to move the ball from the water hazard, you will get -1 stroke.

      Airball: Whenever you make a mighty swing, but you miss the ball, you won’t get the penalty, but the swing will count as a stroke.

      Golf Equipment

      Golf bag

        Two main parts of the golf equipment are the golf club and a golf ball. Those are the fundamentals that you’re supposed to have to even play the game in the first place.

        Golf club: Golf can be played with several different types of golf clubs. There are clubs made out of iron, wood, wedges and putter clubs. Some clubs are made for the long-distance shots, while some are made for the low-distance hits. You can have up to 14 clubs in your bag, and as a beginner, you don’t need that much.

        Golf balls: As a beginner, you should know that you’ll lose a lot of your balls. Get at least two or three dozens to ensure smooth gameplay. There’s no need for expensive ones.

        Golf bag: There are different types of bags – carry bags, Sunday bags, staff bags, travel bags and the most popular ones, cart bags. Depending on your equipment, you should look for a spacious bag that won’t be too bulky. Here’s more on golf bags.

        Special golf shoes: A lot of new players do not think about it, but golf shoes can give you extra comfort and support while protecting you from grass or water. On average, it takes you four to six hours to finish the game of 18 holes – that means you have to get some quality shoes. As a beginner, you might think you’ll be fine with your trainers, but that’s simply wrong.

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        Clothing: Most of the courses will have their dress code, but collared shirts (polos) are the most common in golf clothing. Sunglasses, a hat, and some sunscreen are highly advisable.

        Golf rangefinder: This is maybe one of the most interesting pieces of the golf equipment. The rangefinder is a device that will help you determine the distance between two spots accurately. These small, yet very useful devices are game-changing. Here is a detailed guide to golf rangefinders to help you select the perfect one.

        Golf glove: The glove helps with the grip, sweat, and prevents calluses, and prevents your club from flying out of your hand because of the force of the swing. As a beginner, you should try your swing to get a feel of the clubs before deciding to buy one. If you get sweaty hands naturally, look here for more info on golf gloves.

        Golf Courses

        golf courses

          Golf can be played on different types of courses. Some of those terrains are hard to play on, but there are some that are recommended for beginners. There are public courses, open for everyone, and private ones, reserved for members only.

          Here are the different types of golf courses:

          Links course: The most traditional type of the golf course is links. Some of these courses are over a century old. You can find link courses mostly in countries like Scotland, Ireland, and England.

          Heathland course: They are called heathland because they are made in the large open areas of sandy soil without much vegetation. Usually found in Great Britain, this course is a middle ground between a links and a parkland course.

          Parkland course: These are large, broad, lush courses, with elevation and rough areas. More popular in the later periods, these courses are featured the most in the PGA Tour.

          Desert course: Like the name itself, the game is played on a desert terrain. The desert course is the most recent type that is added to the game, and it is mostly played at competitions in the United States and the Middle East.

          Snow ice course: Playing golf on a snow terrain is fascinating. The terrain is clean, and balls are colored red.

          By size, we sort the golf courses by the number of holes, and the types of holes. For example, you’ll hear courses mentioned like the following: an 18-hole course, a 9-hole course, a Par-3 course, an Approach course, and an Executive course.

          Formats of the Game

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          golf game types

            Almost every game can be played in different ways and by the different rules, but when it comes to golf, you have a bunch of possibilities and formats. Let’s check out some of them:

            Strokeplay: This is one of the most common forms of golf played in professional tournaments. In Strokeplay, you are competing on 18 holes. When the game ends, all players or teams count the total number of strokes, and the team with the lowest total net score wins.

            Foursome: This type of game is played between two players in a partnership. Both teams are using only one ball that is being hit alternately. One player is playing on the odd numbered holes while the other is playing on the even ones. When the game ends, the team with the lowest total net score wins.

            Scramble: Every player in a team tees off on each hole, and after they are done, they decide which shot was the best one. That shot passes the round, and the team continues from that spot until the ball is in the hole. Scramble is one of the most popular game types among the professional players.

            Modified Stableford: The score is determined by the number of points, where the fewer swings you make to finish the hole, the more points you earn. Here are the point standings:

            • Double Eagle: 8 points
            • Eagle: 5 points
            • Birdie: 2 points
            • Par: 0 points
            • Bogey: -1 point
            • Double Bogey or Worse: -3 points

            What’s the difference between Modified Stableford and a regular one?

            The scoring system is different, which means that former awards more points for the good plays while the standard Stableford will penalize weaker plays more.

            These are the four formats of golf that you’ll be playing from the start. Others worth mentioning are: Flags, Money Ball, Bingo Bango Bongo, Callaway System, Peoria System, and more.

            Mastering the Game of Golf

            Now that we have our basics covered; it’s time to go deeper. To master the game, you need to get into the base mechanics and start improving in every single one. Next, you need to perfect your swing, your short game, and start working out to supplement your form. Finally, you need to start developing tactics and strategies for the each course you’ll play to maximize the results and beat your opponents.

            Mechanics

            game mechanics

              The mechanics of a good golf swing can be divided into categories. First, there is the grip, which is essential for the right swing and stroke. Check out the detailed guide to golf club grip on golf.com.

              Next, there is the posture of your body. You need to have stability, and a confident, wide stance is the best option. Don’t go overbroad – a bit wider than shoulder-width is ideal. You have to be stable and confident on your feet, especially while rotating your hips and shoulders during the swing. Here’s a useful video on how to position your body for the best swing.

              The swing itself has five phases:

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              1. The takeaway: The calm phase where you start lifting your club. Calmness is the most important factor here. A bad takeaway can ruin your entire swing, and your stroke might end in a bad location, or even become a penalty shot.
              2. The backswing: This is the phase where you lift the club in the air behind your back. Here’s where stability comes in as the most important factor for a successful stroke. Resist the temptation to turn your feet and head to follow your club, and lower the power.
              3. The transition: The moment of the switch from backswing to a downswing. Pay attention to your lower body in this phase, as it is crucial to a good strike.
              4. The downswing and impact: When your club travels to the point of impact and launches the ball, the single most important thing to focus on here is to have your hands cross the line of the ball before the club. This is achieved by relaxing the grip a bit, and a lot of practice.
              5. The follow-through: The aftermath of the impact will showcase the quality of your swing. If you’ve done something wrong, you will have trouble staying balanced after your shot.

              Extra lessons

                To perfect each section of a golf swing, you’ll need to practice a lot. Taking classes is one of the best decisions you can make in the beginning. There are simply too many things that you can do wrong, and you risk developing some bad habits in your play. Expect to pay $50-100 for a lesson, but with a few lessons from a pro golfer, you’ll thank yourself in the future. Remember, a single shot can be performed in dozens of ways, alternating power, angle, speed, and stance. Developing the “sense” and your aiming skills for golf is one of the most important things for a beginner. Online coaching is popular nowadays, and you can even have your swing analyzed by a pro via online services.

                You’ll Be Horrible in the Beginning

                This is the universal truth that you have to accept. You’ll miss the ball, miss the shot, or ground the club in a hazard often. Don’t expect to be the next Tiger Woods. You will be bad in the beginning, but with enough patience and positivity, you’ll get over the hump and start improving.

                To enhance your game overall, working out is recommended. This is advice that many won’t consider, but the difference it makes is amazing. As a golfer, you need to work on your stability, on your legs, lower back, shoulders and your forearms. Some exercises that golfers benefit from are:

                • Biceps curls
                • Deadlift
                • “Good Morning”
                • Balance-enhancing exercises
                • Lower back extensions
                • All kinds of plank exercises

                Three times a week is a good amount of exercise to enhance your golfing capabilities.

                Besides working out to strengthen your body, you need to practice your swing and develop tactics. If you’re playing on the same field, learn the course as best as you can. By doing this, you’ll be able to capitalize on the particular areas of the course and achieve more points or get closer to the hole.

                strategy

                  Practice the most shots where you can benefit the most, and bring them to perfection as close as possible.

                  That’s how you win.

                  Your ball flew over the pond, the trees, and far beyond every other competitor’s balls.

                  It landed just a few yards away from the hole. You know it, your buddies from the course know it. Victory is secured. You put the ball in the hole with ease and begin the victory dance.

                  Life is good when you win at golf.

                  Now it’s time for you to try it.

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                  Dejan Kvrgic

                  Blogger, Writer

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                  1 The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work) 2 How to Master the Art of Prioritization 3 40 Top Productivity Apps for iPhone (2020 Updated) 4 How to Break Out of Your Comfort Zone 5 How to Find Time for Yourself

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                  Last Updated on January 13, 2020

                  The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

                  The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

                  No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

                  Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

                  Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

                  A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

                  Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

                  In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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                  From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

                  A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

                  For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

                  This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

                  The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

                  That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

                  Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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                  The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

                  Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

                  But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

                  The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

                  The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

                  A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

                  For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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                  But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

                  If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

                  For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

                  These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

                  For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

                  How to Make a Reminder Works for You

                  Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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                  Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

                  Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

                  My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

                  Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

                  I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

                  More on Building Habits

                  Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

                  Reference

                  [1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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