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7 Creative Ways to Learn a New Language

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7 Creative Ways to Learn a New Language

Just like getting into shape requires creative methods including eating healthy practices, using fitness apps, or getting a trainer, we can take advantage of many creative methods to learn a new language.

Today, we’re going to share with you, the top 7 creative ways to learn a language, the pros and cons included.

1. Conversation Exchange

Pros: Can learn with anywhere online
Cons: Time consuming to find the right language partners

Conversation exchanges can be great for someone who wants to practice speaking their language. You find someone online around the world who wants to learn a language that you speak, and voila!

For example, if you want to learn spanish and you know how to speak English, you’ll need to find someone who wants to learn English and knows how to speak Spanish. It’s not impossible, but it does take self-discipline, patience, and more importantly, time.

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    2. Immersion Program

    Pros: Forces you to live in a different country and speak the native language at all times
    Cons: Requires a big portion of your time, money, and commitment

    Immersion programs, if you can afford it, can be a great way to learn a language. Depending on the program, you can be set up with a family host that only speaks your target language, undergo classes, and live in the foreign country that speaks your target language.

    Family sharing meal

      3. Memorize 1,000 Common Words

      Pros: Easy and simple way to get started in learning a language that’s effective
      Cons: Limited to vocabulary, without speaking practice

      Research shows that learning the first 1,000 of the most common words in a language allows you to understand 90% of the oral language.

      This is the ultimate language hack that anyone can start implementing into their studies. Take advantage of free language challenges that will send you 10 of the most common words in your target language, this will take you only 5 minutes a day to learn.

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        4. Language Meetups

        Pros: Great opportunity to meet new friends with something in common
        Cons: Time can be spent speaking English instead of the target language, if not organized well

        If you love meeting people and learning languages, this is an easy sell. Language meetups happen all around the world every week, and you can gather in one room to practice your target language.

        Fair warning: most language meetups are more social than language practicing opportunities. Either way, it’s a great way to spend an evening with like-minded people!

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          5. Online Private Tutoring

          Pros: Learn anywhere in the comforts of your home and save a lot of time
          Cons: Requires an investment

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          If time is of essence for you, private tutoring online can often be the best investment of your money and time. You can gain 1-on-1 access to a professional native speaking teacher. You can learn in the comforts of your home, and you can learn faster with a personalized lesson plan.

          Choosing the right language teacher who matches your personality and interests is a key factor, as the process of learning a language with someone is more relationship-based than anything else.

          skype

            6. Home Immersion

            Pros: Allows you to learn a language without much effort
            Cons: Lacks speaking practice

            There’s a lot of creative ways to set up your own home for language immersion. Keep in mind, this isn’t the most optimal way to learn a language, it should be used as a complementary activity to your other learning efforts.

            One creative way is to label items in your house in your target language. You only need to set this up once, and you can subconsciously retain new vocabulary without much effort as you walk around the house.

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              7. Watch Movies Online

              Pros: Have fun while learning a language
              Cons: Not every movie will have subtitle in your target language

              What’s better than chilling out and watching your favorite movie, while learning a new language?

              This is why watching movies or TV shows online, using your target language as the audio is a great way to learn a language. The tricky part is finding movies that provide audio or subtitles in your desired language.

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                Featured photo credit: vamosblog.co.uk via vamosblog.co.uk

                More by this author

                Sean Kim

                Sean is the founder and CEO of Rype, a language learning app. He's an entrepreneur and blogger.

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                Last Updated on November 25, 2021

                How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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                How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

                There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

                Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

                  What Does Private Browsing Do?

                  When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

                  For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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                  The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

                  The Terminal Archive

                  While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

                  Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

                  dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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                  Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

                  Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

                  However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

                  Clearing Your Tracks

                  Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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                  dscacheutil -flushcache

                  As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

                  Other Browsers and Private Browsing

                  Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

                  If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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                  As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

                  Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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