Advertising

How To Deal With The Dirty Runner’s Trots

Advertising
How To Deal With The Dirty Runner’s Trots

It is a frequent nightmare for all long distance runners:

You are pounding the pavement, making good time, feeling those endorphins cheering you on. Just as you hit the mid-point, you start to feel a little rumble in your guts. Trying to ignore it, you continue pushing yourself to finish the miles. But that rumble turns into a roar, and before you know it you are slowing down so you can clench your butt-cheeks and avoid a disaster.

Advertising

Welcome to the running trots, a gastrointestinal complaint that almost all distance runners experience, and yet hardly anyone speaks about. For first time racers, this can be an insanely humiliating realization. But it’s a really common occurrence for long distance runners.

Advertising

What Causes The Trots?

Experts say it could be the up and down motion, added to the force of your feet hitting the road, which stimulates the bowels. Others claim a lack of blood flow to the GI tract as it is instead diverted to the muscles needed to run. Some believe it is a simple matter of dehydration.

Advertising

More likely, it is a combination of these three factors alongside diet, your body’s familiarity with long runs (new runners often experience much worse trots than experienced ones), and the intensity of your workout. Just understand that many factors contribute to your bowels wanting to empty themselves somewhere around mile thirteen.

Advertising

How To Deal (Without Dying Of Embarrassment)

It would be awesome to say this issue disappears over time, but the truth is that every runner is going to run into it occasionally, even after their hundredth marathon. You need to learn how to deal with the issue, without expiring from pure mortification.

  • You’ve Got To Relax – First of all, you need to calm down. Stress and anxiety can trigger gastrointestinal problems at the best of times, much less when you are taking part in activities that are known for causing it. Take deep breaths, center yourself, and realize that all runners get the runs on their runs, if you know what I mean. No one is going to judge you for it. Try to know in advance where the rest stops are so you can plan to use the bathroom and avoid having to relieve yourself in public arenas and televised events like these athletes did.
  • Plan ahead – Develop a system for relieving yourself before your run. Especially when training for a marathon, get into the habit of unloading your bowels before starting the race. It might not prevent all the GI problems your long distance run can induce, but the less that’s in there at the start, the less that will force its way out during the race.
  • Plug Yourself Up – It is possible to combat the problem with a bit of preparation, though at the end of it you are probably going to need some Preparation H. Constipation is a pretty effective – albeit, uncomfortable – solution to runner’s trots. For a couple of days before a big race eat plenty of high fiber foods: leafy vegetables, potatoes, white rice, white bread, etc. Nothing will be moving down there.
  • Just Let It Go – What did the legendary Paula Radcliffe teach us? If you gotta go, you gotta go. When you are running in a race it isn’t always feasible to make sure a bathroom is nearby. Making sure you go before the race could work, and at least make you less likely to unload in the middle of it. But otherwise, plan your runs on routes with public toilets along the way. Or run in a gym, or at home on a treadmill.

Everybody Does IT – Especially Runners

In the end, this is a very human, normal problem. It is also one that runners are tragically familiar with. When it happens to you, you can consider it a rite of passage!

Advertising

More by this author

Kevin Jones

Content Strategist

Fitness Product Hacks for Busy Workaholics New Year, New You: Making Resolutions That Last Past March Prioritize Your Fitness Goals on a 5K, Avoiding Risky Marathon Training what_happens_when_you_actually_train_at_a_targeted_heart_rate What Happens When You Actually Train At A Targeted Heart Rate 7 Rock Solid Techniques To Make Your 10,000 Daily Steps Really Count

Trending in Food and Drink

1 11 Surprising Benefits Of Coffee That Make It More Irresistible 2 What Can Coffee Do to Your Health (And How to Make the Most Out Of It) 3 Why Doesn’t Coffee Work For Me? Science Says You Should Try Coffee Nap Too 4 6 Reasons Why French Press Makes the Best Coffee 5 20 Delightful Tea And Coffee Recipes You Should Try At Least Once

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on December 2, 2021

The Importance of Making a Camping Checklist

Advertising
The Importance of Making a Camping Checklist

Camping can be hard work, but it’s the preparation that’s even harder. There are usually a lot of things to do in order to make sure that you and your family or friends have the perfect camping experience. But sometimes you might get to your destination and discover that you have left out one or more crucial things.

There is no dispute that preparation and organization for a camping trip can be quite overwhelming, but if it is done right, you would see at the end of the day, that it was worth the stress. This is why it is important to ensure optimum planning and execution. For this to be possible, it is advised that in addition to a to-do-list, you should have a camping checklist to remind you of every important detail.

Advertising

Why You Should Have a Camping Checklist

Creating a camping checklist makes for a happy and always ready camper. It also prevents mishaps.  A proper camping checklist should include every essential thing you would need for your camping activities, organized into various categories such as shelter, clothing, kitchen, food, personal items, first aid kit, informational items, etc. These categories should be organized by importance. However, it is important that you should not list more than you can handle or more than is necessary for your outdoor adventure.

Camping checklists vary depending on the kind of camping and outdoor activities involved. You should not go on the internet and compile a list of just any camping checklist. Of course, you can research camping checklists, but you have to put into consideration the kind of camping you are doing. It could be backpacking, camping with kids, canoe camping, social camping, etc. You have to be specific and take note of those things that are specifically important to your trip, and those things which are generally needed in all camping trips no matter the kind of camping being embarked on.

Advertising

Here are some tips to help you prepare for your next camping trip.

  1. First off, you must have found the perfect campground that best suits your outdoor adventure. If you haven’t, then you should. Sites like Reserve America can help you find and reserve a campsite.
  2. Find or create a good camping checklist that would best suit your kind of camping adventure.
  3. Make sure the whole family is involved in making out the camping check list or downloading a proper checklist that reflects the families need and ticking off the boxes of already accomplished tasks.
  4. You should make out or download a proper checklist months ahead of your trip to make room for adjustments and to avoid too much excitement and the addition of unnecessary things.
  5. Checkout Camping Hacks that would make for a more fun camping experience and prepare you for different situations.

Now on to the checklist!

Advertising

Here is how your checklist should look

1. CAMPSITE GEAR

  • Tent, poles, stakes
  • Tent footprint (ground cover for under your tent)
  • Extra tarp or canopy
  • Sleeping bag for each camper
  • Sleeping pad for each camper
  • Repair kit for pads, mattress, tent, tarp
  • Pillows
  • Extra blankets
  • Chairs
  • Headlamps or flashlights ( with extra batteries)
  • Lantern
  • Lantern fuel or batteries

2.  KITCHEN

  • Stove
  • Fuel for stove
  • Matches or lighter
  • Pot
  • French press or portable coffee maker
  • Corkscrew
  • Roasting sticks for marshmallows, hot dogs
  • Food-storage containers
  • Trash bags
  • Cooler
  • Ice
  • Water bottles
  • Plates, bowls, forks, spoons, knives
  • Cups, mugs
  • Paring knife, spatula, cooking spoon
  • Cutting board
  • Foil
  • soap
  • Sponge, dishcloth, dishtowel
  • Paper towels
  • Extra bin for washing dishes

3. CLOTHES

  • Clothes for daytime
  • Sleepwear
  • Swimsuits
  • Rainwear
  • Shoes: hiking/walking shoes, easy-on shoes, water shoes
  • Extra layers for warmth
  • Gloves
  • Hats

4. PERSONAL ITEMS

  • Sunscreen
  • Insect repellent
  • First-aid kit
  • Prescription medications
  • Toothbrush, toiletries
  • Soap

5. OTHER ITEMS

  • Camera
  • Campsite reservation confirmation, phone number
  • Maps, area information

This list is not completely exhaustive. To make things easier, you can check specialized camping sites like RealSimpleRainyAdventures, and LoveTheOutdoors that have downloadable camping checklists that you can download on your phone or gadget and check as you go.

Featured photo credit: Scott Goodwill via unsplash.com

Read Next