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5 Lost Paradise Areas in Washington DC You Must Definitely See

5 Lost Paradise Areas in Washington DC You Must Definitely See

It’s really easy to get lost in the capital of the U.S.―to get lost in a very good sense. Probably, when you plan a trip to Washington DC, the first thing that comes to your mind is U.S. Capitol and White House. If you’re a big fan of the “House of Cards” series, you definitely should go there, but also don’t forget to visit the places listed below. And so as literally not to get lost and find a cosy place to stay, the DC Metro Map & Hotel Map would come in handy.

Feeling Good in Georgetown

Buildings along a road, M street, Georgetown, Washington DC, USA
    Buildings along a road, M street, Georgetown, Washington DC, USA

    The brick sidewalks, greenery, and historic architecture won’t leave you indifferent if you’re in Georgetown neighborhood. Although it was established in 1751, Georgetown as any other old district would give you a feeling of joy and happiness. Ice cream parlours, cupcakeries, cafes, boutiques, and shopping malls would help you to dive into the city busyness. If you need a break, you always can walk along the Potomac River or find a green cozy corner in a local park.

    Georgetown is considered DC’s unofficial cupcake capital, so don’t miss the opportunity to try this tasty dessert. If you’ve already graduated from university, it’s high time to feel a student spirit again and visit Georgetown campus. It’s the oldest Jesuit and Catholic University in the United States. Its Gothic and Georgian architecture will give you an impression you’re in the medieval times.

    And finally, have a bike ride along the C & O Canal Towpath which blends 185 miles of trails with 19th century cobblestone locks. Excited? So, what are you waiting for?

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    Forever Young in U Street Corridor

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      Known as “Black Broadway” in 1920, U Street gives its visitors a good “food” for soul and body. Avant-garde jazz, mainstream hip-hop, and alt-rock bands plus historic row houses with Caribbean and soul food restaurants would definitely make your evening. Want to dance all night or visit a good concert? Then The 9:30 Club, founded in 1980, should be your choice.

      At the daytime, take a look at the brownstones and Victorian homes in the neighborhood, you’ll fall in love with this fancy architecture, for sure. The memory of your phone would be full, as you won’t be able to stop from taking photos of street art masterpieces. If you’re not packing your bag yet, it’s a high time to start.

      In Pursuit of Solitude in Cathedral Heights

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        Looking for the peaceful and quiet place in Washington DC? Then it’s located in the Cathedral Heights neighborhood. Cathedral Heights is famous for its historic row houses, detached cottages, and old apartment buildings. But the most majestic architecture work in this area is Washington National Cathedral in a Neo-Gothic style that had been built for over 80 years in the 20th century.

        Here you can find such old and interesting building as St. Albans School and Church, Herb Cottage, Episcopal Church House, and Beauvoir (National Cathedral Elementary School established in 1900). Close to downtown but very tranquil as a countryside, this area will give you a feeling of coziness and serenity.

        Logan Circle as A Lifestyle

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          This nearly-downtown neighborhood would charm you with its hip cafes and trendy specialty stores. It seems that here, you can find a place for any taste and mood. Prepare to spend your money in beer, tapas, and cocktail bars, and boutiques, of course. You’ll be impressed how fashionable and detailed the design of every café, bar, and shop is.

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          Also, don’t forget to save some time for the Studio Theatre, a local contemporary theater to enjoy one of its great performances. The neighborhood has a great transit so you can easily get to the other interesting places such as the Smithsonian Museums and the federal area.

          Just A Business at Judiciary Square

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            If you want to get into the heart of the federal Washington, then simply head to Judiciary Square. Here’s the biggest concentration of government office buildings and facilities, including Supreme Court, FBI, and United States Tax Court Building. Among the best places to see in this area is National Building Museum (the Pension Building). If you are interested in architecture, design, engineering, construction, and urban planning, then the Museum will be a perfect choice.

            The interesting fact is that the National Building Museum’s Corinthian columns are among the largest in the world measuring 23 m tall and 2.4 m in diameter. And if we’ve already started to talk about the museums, then National Gallery of Art would be an interesting place to visit as well. It is ranked 8th globally by the number of visitors and has a huge collection of paintings, drawings, prints, photographs, sculpture, medals, and decorative arts traces.

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            The list of places worth seeing in Washington DC can be endless. It seems that this city keeps a corner for everyone – from a stay-at-home person, who needs peace and solitude to busy and active people who love chilling out in hip bars and clubs. And what are you up to?

            Featured photo credit: pixabay.com via pixabay.com

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            Last Updated on March 13, 2019

            How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

            How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

            Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

            You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

            Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

            1. Work on the small tasks.

            When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

            Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

            2. Take a break from your work desk.

            Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

            Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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            3. Upgrade yourself

            Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

            The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

            4. Talk to a friend.

            Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

            Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

            5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

            If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

            Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

            Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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            6. Paint a vision to work towards.

            If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

            Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

            Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

            7. Read a book (or blog).

            The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

            Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

            Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

            8. Have a quick nap.

            If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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            9. Remember why you are doing this.

            Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

            What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

            10. Find some competition.

            Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

            Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

            11. Go exercise.

            Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

            Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

            As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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            Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

            12. Take a good break.

            Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

            Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

            Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

            Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

            More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

            Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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