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Misconceptions About Texting and Driving Revealed

Misconceptions About Texting and Driving Revealed

Texting and driving has undeniably become a chronic problem. From law enforcement to researchers, from cellphone makers to service providers, everybody involved is trying to tackle the increasing menace.

SimpleTexting, a company that offers text marketing services, has compiled a few eye-opening statistics about the ever-present urban threat.

    Texting and driving has always been assumed to be a “thing” among modern youth. Both the activities offer a tremendous amount of freedom. The law, as well as regularly published reports, routinely single out teenagers as the primary culprits. They are often blamed for devoting their entire attention to a cell phone, even while they are behind the wheel.

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    This society associates texting and driving primarily with the youth’s domain. While kids are way more distracted on the roads today, statistics gathered by SimpleTexting indicate they aren’t the sole culprit. Here are some of the misconceptions the study busted:

    It’s the teens who are texting and driving

    It appears the teens are the least of the worries when it comes to texting while driving. While teenagers are part of the problem, they are the least contributors to the menace. While one would point the finger at the next-likely age group, they would be wrong. Shockingly, it is the seniors who seem to commonly ignore safety and indulge in texting while driving.

      While driving in your later years isn’t a crime, it is seldom advised and should never be encouraged. Advanced age brings with it a myriad of health concerns that hinder optimum performance behind the wheel. Add to it the blatant disregard for public and road safety by texting, and this is an impending disaster just waiting to happen.

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      Of the people surveyed, 14.4 percent of people guilty of texting and driving were above the age of 65. It is equally surprising to note that the number of people texting while driving declines with younger age groups (aside from the 25-34 range). The numbers seem to indicate people lose their concern about safety as they age.

      The law keeps the violators in check

      Laws against texting and driving have been made stricter in recent times. The penalties for not paying attention to the road are steep. Repeated violators stand to lose their driving license and privileges.

      Under such circumstances, one would assume the law might be keeping the law breakers in check. However, the statistics indicate the assumptions couldn’t be any further from the ground reality.

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        According to the research conducted by SimpleTexting, over 90 percent of people who text and drive aren’t pulled over or caught. Less than 8 percent of violators claim that they have actually been stopped or caught by the police. Unfortunately, the report doesn’t reveal what action the cops chose to take against those guilty of texting while driving. The fact that so many manage to evade the long arm of the law is quite concerning.

        Hands-free technology works

        While car makers these days include hands-free technology that is aimed at preventing texting while driving, almost half of the people surveyed do not use it.

        For quite a few reasons, 45 percent of the drivers said they never paired their cell phone with the hands-free technology in their cars, while 22 percent have used it very rarely.

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          There has been no legislature that mandates the use of hands-free technology. Moreover, behavioral experts often stress that use of such technology doesn’t improve the attention of the driver on the road. Instead, it only works to worsen the already bad situation by adding anxiety about the reliable connection to the mix.

            The report also indicated that people who text and drive rarely admit it. The culprits are often known to blatantly lie about their addiction to texting. From a technological perspective, it seems iPhone users are more prone to texting while driving when compared to Android users.

              Featured photo credit: Texting and Driving via veracruz.quadratin.com.mx

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              Erick Clifford

              Journalist

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              Last Updated on February 15, 2019

              7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

              7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

              Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

              Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

              Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

              So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

              Joe’s Goals

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                Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

                Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

                Daytum

                  Daytum

                  is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

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                  Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

                  Excel or Numbers

                    If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

                    What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

                    Evernote

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                      I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

                      Evernote is free with a premium version available.

                      Access or Bento

                        If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

                        Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

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                        You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

                        Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

                        All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

                        Conclusion

                        I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

                        What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

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