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Six Patio Door Styles to Bring the Outdoors In

Six Patio Door Styles to Bring the Outdoors In

The patio door is more than just an entrance or exit to your home—it’s an architectural detail. Whether you are remodeling your exterior space or just want a fresh vibe when you walk through the door, a new patio door can instantly inject style in your home.

From fresh and modern to rustic and woodsy, patio doors have the ability to subtly transform any space. Below are some of our favorite materials to work with and descriptions of why each of them can be especially beneficial when it comes to selecting a brand new patio door design.

1. Composite: The Go-To

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    An ideal material for patio doors, composite wood offers high-quality design with low-maintenance requirements. A composite patio door won’t rust, dent, split or warp, and it’s perfect for nearly every climate, including those with high humidity and moisture. Composite patio doors are available in a variety of styles and silhouettes, from relaxed and rustic to tailored and traditional. The composite sliding door shown above pairs perfectly with tempered, high-performance insulating glass and weather stripping for energy efficiency.

    2. Fiberglass: Maintenance Free

     

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      Similar to composite material, fiberglass patio doors are basically maintenance-free. They are perfect for homes with children and pets, as fingerprints and wet nose smudges are easy to clean off of the fiberglass surface. If you’re going for the look of wood but want to spare yourself a few pennies, fiberglass is a great option. Its twists, knots and warps mimic that of wood’s natural look at a much lower price point. This classic fiberglass style offers a low-maintenance, relaxed style perfect for the active family or the older adult couple.

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      3. Aluminum: Lightweight and Versatile

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        Another alternative to wood, aluminum offers a lightweight option to homeowners looking to keep costs down. Aluminum is corrosion-resistant and performs well in most climates. These patio doors often come with enclosed blinds—a set of blinds hugged between two thin insets of glass—to help control light and heat within the home. This is a great feature for families with small children or curious pets as the cord to the blinds is contained within the door or up high where it is out of the reach of tiny hands.

        4. Steel: Safe and Secure

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          Steel, the economic option, is a great material for patio doors. It offers strength and durability while simultaneously adding style to your space. A good choice for most climates, steel patio doors are super resistant to rust and corrosion. They only require a minimal amount of upkeep and are often paired with other elements like polyurethane insulation to ensure maximum energy efficiency.

          5. Vinyl: The Sturdy Option

           

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            Vinyl is a strong, plastic material used for its durability and cost efficiency. Over the years, vinyl has picked up some serious steam in design, lending its strength to both interior and exterior spaces. While a synthetic material like vinyl may not seem sturdy at first, it has proven itself to have an uncanny ability to stand up to most environmental elements and works remarkably well in nearly all climates.

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            6. Wood: The Cult Classic

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              Last but certainly not least, wooden patio doors come in a range of colors, textures and strengths. Depending on where the wood was harvested and which type of tree it is from, patio doors can range from a warm honey tone to cool oak color and are typically made of pine, fir, mahogany or alder. Oftentimes, wood patio doors are painted over or have a stain applied for a worn or polished effect. Very sturdy and strong, wood offers a different shape and silhouette to patio doors that differ greatly from synthetic materials like vinyl and composite.

              Finding the right patio door is all about evaluating your lifestyle and needs as well as your home’s interior and exterior style. From composite glass to sturdy steel, there are many ways to show off your home’s style with one simple element. What is your favorite patio door style?

              Featured photo credit: http://www.shutterstock.com via shutterstock.com

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              Kerrie Kelly

              Interior designer

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              Last Updated on December 2, 2018

              How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

              How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

              Ebb and flow. Contraction and expansion. Highs and lows. It’s all about the cycles of life.

              The entire course of our life follows this up and down pattern of more and then less. Our days flow this way, each following a pattern of more energy, then less energy, more creativity and periods of greater focus bookended by moments of low energy when we cringe at the thought of one more meeting, one more call, one more sentence.

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              The key is in understanding how to use the cycles of ebb and flow to our advantage. The ability to harness these fluctuations, understand how they affect our productivity and mood and then apply that knowledge as a tool to improve our lives is a valuable strategy that few individuals or corporations have mastered.

              Here are a few simple steps to start using this strategy today:

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              Review Your Past Flow

              Take just a few minutes to look back at how your days and weeks have been unfolding. What time of the day are you the most focused? Do you prefer to be more social at certain times of the day? Do you have difficulty concentrating after lunch or are you energized? Are there days when you can’t seem to sit still at your desk and others when you could work on the same project for hours?

              Do you see a pattern starting to emerge? Eventually you will discover a sort of map or schedule that charts your individual productivity levels during a given day or week.  That’s the first step. You’ll use this information to plan your days going forward.

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              Schedule According to Your Flow Pattern

              Look at the types of things you do each day…each week. What can you move around so that it’s a better fit for you? Can you suggest to your team that you schedule meetings for late morning if you can’t stand to be social first thing? Can you schedule detailed project work or highly creative tasks, like writing or designing when you are best able to focus? How about making sales calls or client meetings on days when you are the most social and leaving billing or reports until another time when you are able to close your door and do repetitive tasks.

              Keep in mind that everyone is different and some things are out of our control. Do what you can. You might be surprised at just how flexible clients and managers can be when they understand that improving your productivity will result in better outcomes for them.

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              Account for Big Picture Fluctuations

              Look at the bigger picture. Consider what happens during different months or times during the year. Think about what is going on in the other parts of your life. When is the best time for you to take on a new project, role or responsibility? Take into account other commitments that zap your energy. Do you have a sick parent, a spouse who travels all the time or young children who demand all of your available time and energy?

              We all know people who ignore all of this advice and yet seem to prosper and achieve wonderful success anyway, but they are usually the exception, not the rule. For most of us, this habitual tendency to force our bodies and our brains into patterns of working that undermine our productivity result in achieving less than desired results and adding more stress to our already overburdened lives.

              Why not follow the ebb and flow of your life instead of fighting against it?

                Featured photo credit: Nathan Dumlao via unsplash.com

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