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Sell Faster and Smarter: 5 Time Management Hacks For Salespeople

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Sell Faster and Smarter: 5 Time Management Hacks For Salespeople

Time is money, as the old adage goes, and that’s never truer than it is for a sales team. The problem is that a salesperson never seems to have enough time. There are cold calls to make, quotes to put together, and presentations to give. Beyond that, plenty of time is spent on clerical, non-sales activities. The result for many salespeople is that they feel overworked and never have enough time to do all the selling they’d like to.

In reality, the difference between great salespeople and good salespeople is often that great salespeople know how to manage their time. By using every minute to its fullest, they’re able to knock out the mundane tasks and still have plenty of time left in the day to actually sell.

Here are five of the most effective time management strategies to make sure you’re able to sell more without having to put long hours in every day:

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1. Tackle hard projects first

Everybody has one or two things that they never feel like doing. For some reps, it might be cold calls. For others, it could be entering information into the CRM system. Many people hate checking and writing emails.

The bottom line is that it’s easy to push these tasks off and procrastinate doing something less important. If you really want to become a master of time management, you need to get your most unpleasant tasks over with as quickly as possible. This removes stress from the rest of your day and makes everything else just a bit easier.

2. Forget about multitasking

Multitasking is a badge of honor for many busy professionals, but it usually causes more harm than good. When you switch between two tasks, you lose momentum and work slower on both of them.

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If you’re handling something, see it through to the end before switching to another task. This keeps your momentum going and allows you to finish everything quicker than if you tried to tackle it all at once.

3. Keep email to a minimum

With email now tied to smartphones, it’s easy to get distracted dozens of times each day due to an incoming message. Your time is better used, if you avoid checking email throughout the day, and instead only respond to messages during scheduled times. You could schedule half hour blocks during the morning, afternoon, and right before you leave for the day. This minimizes distractions and allows you to bear down on more important tasks.

Many salespeople hesitate to do this because they’re afraid of missing something important. What if a large client sends an urgent message? There are several solutions to this. First, you can build alerts to notify you when something truly urgent comes in (from a certain client, containing certain keywords, etc.). You could also use this as an opportunity to offer your very best clients a bit of a value add, giving them access to a special ‘VIP’ email address that you do check 24/7. No matter how you handle it, the key is making sure only truly important emails get your immediate attention.

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4. Group activities

When you’re doing a particular task, you get into a groove. It’s similar to building muscle — the more often you use it, the better and stronger it’s going to be. For example, instead of making prospecting calls and immediately sending a follow-up email, break the tasks up.

You’ll be more efficient at making calls and leaving messages, if you aren’t constantly breaking rhythm by typing up emails. Send your emails later in the day when people are less likely to pick up the phone anyway.

5. Prioritize tasks each day

The best way to make sure everything gets done each day is by writing it down and checking it off as you complete it. Prioritize each task in three ways: tasks that must be completed that day, tasks that must be completed in the next couple days, and tasks that you’d like to complete if you have the time. Work through the most important tasks first, trying to get through to your third list. This will keep you focused on what’s important while keeping your eye on the future, too.

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Conclusion:

Being a salesperson is a difficult job with plenty of tasks to take care of each day. By managing your time more effectively and using the advice discussed above, however, you’ll be able to spend more time on your most valuable activities. You’ll relieve yourself of stress and end up selling much more.

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Last Updated on January 13, 2022

How to Use Travel Time Effectively

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How to Use Travel Time Effectively

Most of us associate travel and time with what we’re going to do one we get to our destination. Planning and mapping out what to do once you arrive can certainly make for a more pleasurable vacation, but there are things you can do while you are on your way that can make it even better.

Sure, you can plan for the things you’re going to do on your vacation while you are travelling en route – but what about making use of that time for other things that you don’t usually do when you’re at home? You don’t need to have your gadgets with you to do it, and you can really connect with yourself if you take the time to manage your life while heading towards your vacation destination.

Here are some great tips to help you with your time management while you travel, some of which are more conventional than others. Nonetheless, you can find out what works best for you and apply them accordingly depending on when and how you are travelling.

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1. Take Your Time Getting There

As I write this, I’m on a flight to San Francisco. Flying is the fastest way to get from place to place, and for many people it’s really the only way to travel.

But I’ve often taken the train or ferry on trips so that I have extra time without distraction to get more done. I’m not worrying about navigation or lack of space to do what I want to do. Instead I’m able to focus on getting stuff done during the time I’ve got without feeling rushed. For example, when I took the train from Vancouver to Portland, it was an eight hour trip and I managed to get a ton of writing done and closed a lot of open loops. It also was less expensive than flying, which was a bonus.

Sometimes taking the long way to get somewhere on vacation can be the best thing for you to get somewhere with your life.

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2. Go Gadget-Free

This is going to be a tough one for a lot of you. But why do you need to bring your gadgets with you when you go on vacation? It isn’t be a bad idea to leave all but one of them behind, and only pull out that one when you absolutely need to do so. In some countries, you’d be wise to be discreet with them anyway since flaunting them in front of those that are less fortunate than you isn’t a good practice. While it may not seem like flaunting to you, in different cultures it can definitely come across that way.

If you can’t go gadget-free, then at least go Internet-free. If you use a task management app that requires syncing across your multiple devices to be effective, remember that if you only have the one device with you then it can be the “master device” for the time being and will store your data locally anyway. Just sync up when you get home.

3. Reflect and Prepare

Finally, going on any sort of excursion gives you the perfect opportunity to reflect on where you’ve been. The fact you have removed yourself from where you usually are can give you a perspective that you simply can’t get when you’re at home. You may want to journal your thoughts during this time – and by taking more time to get to your destination you’ll have more time to dig deeper into it.

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After a period of reflection – however long that happens to be – you can then begin to not only prepare for the rest of your travels, you can prepare for the rest of what happens afterward. The reflection period is important, though. You need to really know where you’ve been in order to properly look at where you want to be. Time away from things gives you that chance.

Conclusion

Traveling isn’t always about where you’re going and how quickly you can get there. In fact, it’s rarely about that at all.

More often it’s where you’re at in your head that will dictate how much you benefit from traveling. So don’t just go somewhere fast. Instead, take your time on the way there and take the time to connect with not only where you are but who are while you’re there.

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If you do that, you’ll have a better chance to be who you want to be when you leave.

Featured photo credit: bruce mars via unsplash.com

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