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Public or Private School? 3 Things to Consider When Raising a Child With Special Needs

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Public or Private School? 3 Things to Consider When Raising a Child With Special Needs

When you have a child with special needs, you may struggle to determine the best setting for their education. Perhaps you have a gifted and talented child who struggles to stay attentive in a traditional classroom with their set schedules and blanket teaching styles. Maybe your child has learning disabilities and requires extra attention that simply cannot be found in a public school setting.

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, as of 2014, 13% of all public school students received special education services. On an average, over 6 million students a year need special help in order to further their educational development. With plenty of kids needing specific attention to their educational needs, why do some school systems lack so severely in this area? If you’re questioning whether to choose public school or private school for your child with special needs, there are three factors you should carefully consider.

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1. What Do Your Local Schools Offer?

Some public schools offer wonderful programs that are geared specifically toward children with special needs. Their special needs children thrive through inclusion in regular classrooms, incorporation of special classes into their regular days, and special support when they need it most.

Private schools may be able to offer more specialized and individualized education for each child the school cares for, but they don’t necessarily have the available budget, services, and experience to handle your child’s unique disability. Do the educators come equipped with masters in special education, readily prepped to handle anything your child throws their way? Take the time to discuss the school’s offerings before making a decision for your child.

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2. What Do Student Populations Look Like?

At many private schools, you’ll find a relatively low percentage of special needs students. At others, especially those with programs dedicated to a specific disability, you’ll find high populations of students with specific educational needs. You want your child to have every social and academic advantage possible, and that includes surrounding them with similarly-able peers they can interact with on a regular basis.

Too large a percentage of special needs students, however, may mean that each individual student doesn’t receive enough attention. Pay careful attention to the existing student populations when choosing between public and private school for your child.

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3. What’s Your Budget?

As much as you’d like to pretend that money isn’t an object, it matters! Private school can be very expensive. You shouldn’t have to break your budget in order to provide your student with a quality education. If your budget allows for private school without needing to stretch too far, it’s a much more viable option than it would be for a family that struggles to provide those opportunities for their student.

On the other hand, if affording a private school will be a financial struggle, carefully consider whether or not those sacrifices will really be worth it–and whether or not a private school education actually provides the ideal experience for your child. Consider the benefits that come from spending more money on tuition each year. With specialized extra classes and hands-on assistance from trained staff, the positives may far out weigh the financial costs. Choose a plan that is best suited for your family and stick to it. Changing up a child’s system in the middle of their schooling years can prove to be even more difficult.

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Choosing the right school environment for a child is never easy. It’s even harder when your child has a unique set of needs that set them apart from their classmates and slows down their educational progression. Take the time to review your options. Consider out of state schools, if it is financially possible. Your child’s learning development will set the standard for their growth throughout their entire life. By carefully considering these three criteria, however, you can make a decision that will allow your child the best educational opportunity possible.

Featured photo credit: Shutterstock via shutterstock.com

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Kara Masterson

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Last Updated on January 5, 2022

How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades

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How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades

Children are most likely to say that they want to just lounge around or rest for a while after spending hours listening to lecture after lecture from their teachers. There is nothing wrong with this if they had a rough day.

What’s disturbing, is if they deliberately stay away from schoolwork or procrastinate when it comes to reviewing for their tests or completing an important science project.

When it seems that it is becoming a habit for your child to put off school work, it’s time for you to step in and help your child develop good study habits to get better grades. It is important for you to emphasize to your child the importance of setting priorities early in life. Don’t wait for them to flunk their tests, or worse, fail in their subjects before you talk to them about it.

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You can help your children hurdle their tests with these 7 tips:

1. Help them set targets

Ask your child what they want to achieve for that particular school year. Tell them to set a specific goal or target. If they say, “I want to get better grades,” tell them to be more specific. It will be better if they say they want to get a GPA of 2.5 or higher. Having a definite target will make it easier for them to undertake a series of actions to achieve their goals, instead of just “shooting for the moon.”

2. Preparation is key

At the start of the school year, teachers provide an outline of a subject’s scope along with a reading list and other course requirements. Make sure that your child has all the materials they need for these course requirements. Having these materials on hand will make sure that your child will have no reason to procrastinate and give them the opportunity to study in advance.

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3. Teach them to mark important dates

You may opt to give them a small notebook where they can jot down important dates or a planner that has dates where they can list their schedule. Ask them to show this to you so you can give them “gentle reminders” to block off the whole week before the dates of an exam. During this week, advise your child to not schedule any social activity so they can concentrate on studying.

4. Schedule regular study time

Encourage your child to set aside at least two hours every day to go through their lessons. This will help them remember the lectures for the day and understand the concepts they were taught. They should be encouraged to spend more time on subjects or concepts that they do not understand.

5. Get help

Some kids find it hard to digest or absorb mathematical or scientific concepts. Ask your child if they are having difficulties with their subjects and if they would like to seek the help of a tutor. There is nothing wrong in asking for the assistance of a tutor who can explain complex subjects.

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6. Schedule some “downtime”

Your child needs to relax from time to time. During his break, you can consider bringing your child to the nearest mall or grocery store and get them a treat. You may play board games with them during their downtime. The idea is to take his mind off studying for a limited period of time.

7. Reward your child

If your child achieves their goals for the school year, you may give them a reward such as buying them the gadget they have always wanted or allowing them to vacation wherever they want. By doing this, you are telling your child that hard work does pay off.

Conclusion

You need to take the time to monitor your child’s performance in school. Your guidance is essential to helping your child realize the need to prioritize their school activities. As a parent, your ultimate goal is to expose your child to habits that will lay down the groundwork for their future success.

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Featured photo credit: Annie Spratt via unsplash.com

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