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18 Essential Apps You’ll Need For Your First Week of College

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18 Essential Apps You’ll Need For Your First Week of College

When it comes to starting college, there is a very good chance that a lot of students will be lost on their first day. From finding classes to making new friends– it can be a very overwhelming experience. These 18 essential apps will help you during your first week of classes.

Social Apps

1. R We Still On Time? 

This can be used for group meetings as well as getting your group of friends together on time. R We Still On Time gives you the status of all your friends, letting you know if they’re going to be prompt or late.

2. Hopspot

Hopspot is a social app that will allow you to connect with your friends in real time. By only allowing you to post about plans, it eliminates the “distractions” of other social media. The best part is that it clears every morning, giving you a clean slate.

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    3. Eventbrite

    All sporting events, local concerts, and cheap off-campus activities, are at the touch of your finger with this app. You can connect your Facebook account to see who among your friends are going to each event and even invite them yourself!

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    Study / Productivity

    4. Pocket Points

    Pocket Points is a new app that gives students rewards for not using their phone during class. All that you have to do is open the app on campus, lock your phone, and start gaining points. Points can then be used at local stores or for other incentives.

    pocket-points college app

      5. iHomework

      This is essentially a digital assignment book. It allows you to organize all your schoolwork and assignments all in one app. iHomework also has a feature that sends you reminders when you have a test or quiz coming up.

      6. Good Morning Alarm Clock

      Gone are the days of sleeping past your 8am’s– this app is an alarm clock unlike any other. This app helps you keep track of the quality of your sleep, and wakes you up at the least disruptive time in your sleep cycle. It also sends you a notification if you’re sleep deprived.

      7. Study Blue

      An alternative to wasting paper by writing on hundreds of notecards to study, Study Blue allows you to create your own flash cards digitally. The app features a thumbs up and down button to indicate what you’ve memorized. It also lets you know what you need to work on.

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      8. Easybib

      This app helps you site your references easily and efficiently. Simply scan the barcode of the book you used (or enter its info manually), and EasyBib sorts out a bibliography in your choice of MLA, APA, or Chicago-Styled format.

      9. WordFail

      WordFail is useful because it helps you learn how to use the most commonly misused words in English. If you think you’re an English master then you should give this a try. Chances are it will help you out in the college setting, or even when you’re sending out that email for your first new job.

      college app wordfail

        10. Stop. Breathe & Think

        Stop. Breathe & Think promises to offer easy meditation in less than 5 minutes. Studies have shown that a relaxed and focused brain increases productivity and performance. If you’re stressed over a deadline or procrastinating, this is the app for you.

        11. Flash Card Hero

        This is a great flashcard app that allows you to import different quizzes from Quizlet. You can also add images or book chapters for enhanced studying. The multiple choice option as well as audio support makes this a must-have for any new college student.

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          Budget

          12. Saviry

          Saviry helps you find the latest deals on numerous household items, and helps you find the lowest price for the item you’re looking for in your area. It includes clothing sales and discounts on popular tech gadgets.

          13. My Super Market

          Create your grocery list on this app and let it take care of the rest for you. My Supermarket takes the items that you’re looking for, and shows you a list of local grocery stores selling it at the lowest price

          14. You Need A Budget

          This is a quick and easy budgeting app that also has a one month free trial. It’s a different way of thinking about budgeting and saving money. They claim that the average user saves over $200 in their first month.

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          college budget apps

            Cooking / Fitness

            15. Cocktail Flow

            This app describes itself as a ‘definitive cocktail encyclopedia’ that lets you find hundreds of drink recipes. The app also allows you to search recipes by alcohol or beer you already have, and filters out recipes available with those specific ingredients.

            16. Fooducate

            Conquer the ‘Freshman 15’ with Fooducate. This app helps you set a weight loss, fitness, or health goal, to then track your daily food intake and physical activity.

            17. Sworkit

            This app lets you customize workouts that can be done anywhere for any amount of time. You can even connect through Spotify to add music to your workouts.

            18. Cheftap

            Cheftap is essential because you can save and import pretty much any recipe you come across on the internet. The best part is that all the recipes are all in one place and ready for later use.

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              These are 18 essential apps that will help you during your first week of classes– and who knows? You may very well end up using them for the rest of the school year, and the ones to come.

              Featured photo credit: Workspace on a blanket via kaboompics.com

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              Colby Almond

              Professional

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              Last Updated on November 25, 2021

              How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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              How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

              There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

              Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

                What Does Private Browsing Do?

                When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

                For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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                The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

                The Terminal Archive

                While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

                Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

                dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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                Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

                Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

                However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

                Clearing Your Tracks

                Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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                dscacheutil -flushcache

                As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

                Other Browsers and Private Browsing

                Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

                If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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                As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

                Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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