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Top 5 Myths on Learning a Language You Should Know

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Top 5 Myths on Learning a Language You Should Know

Everywhere we go, there are myths all around us. This is ever so true when it comes to language learning. We have misconceptions that have been told to us by the media, friends, and traditional educational systems, that limits us from acheiving what we want to accomplish.

Today, we’re going to reveal the top 5 myths about learning a new language.

Myth #1: “I can’t learn a language because I can’t travel…”

The requirement to travel in order to learn a language is probably one of the biggest misconceptions we have.

Part of the reason is that we see language bloggers putting up photos of themselves traveling the world and interacting with native speakers. This can be a good source of motivation for us to learn the language, but it’s fairly misleading.

Most people, including language experts, are learning a language in their local city. Unless you have the luxury of escaping for a full year to go on a language immersion, you’ll need to learn via a conversation exchange, language school, or with a private online teacher.

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Myth #2: “All language learners are more extroverted than I am…”

When we picture a polyglot, we naturally see someone at a social event speaking multiple languages with other attendees.

In reality, polyglots are no more extroverted than the average individual. They stumble upon awkward situations, and they feel moments of nervousness when meeting random strangers. In other words, there are certain polyglots who are introverted, and other polyglots who are extroverted– just like everyone else.

What should be noted is that polyglots enjoy the act of practicing their target language, and they seek out opportunities to interact with native speakers because of this reason.

If you’re letting this limitation prevent you from starting, you should remember that there are other language learners who have been in the exact same shoes as you are.

Myth #3: “I’m too old to learn a language…”

You’ve probably heard this before.

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“Am I too old to learn another language?”
“I learned [insert language] when I was young, but I can’t learn one now…”

This is another outdated myth that we’ve believed for far too long, and recent studies have appeared disproving this logic. Sure, our brains were developing at a faster rate when we were children, but that’s not the entire picture.

the-age-factor-in-second-language-acquisition-3-638 (1)

    Age is only one of the many factors that affect our learning speed, along with emotions, genetics, learning environment, internal motivation, and more.

    It also depends on what languages you already know. For example, if you’re an English speaker, learning how to speak Spanish is going to be much easier than learning Mandarin.

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    Myth #4: “Everybody speaks English. Why do I need to learn another language?”

    Yes it’s true. There are a lot of people in the world that speak English. About one quarter of the world’s population.

    But what about the other 5.4 billion people around the world?

    Countries_where_over_50_of_the_population_are_native_English_speakers-768x350

      In the multicultural world that we live in, everything from business, entertainment, and culture is becoming globalized.

      If you want to thrive in the 21st century as a professional, it’s worth learning a foreign language, because you never know when it will come in handy.

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      Myth #5: “I don’t have enough time…”

      All of us have 24 hours in a day. That’s the beauty of time, it is the greatest equalizer among us.

      The difference between successful people and the rest, is that successful people know how to prioritize what’s important in their schedule. If learning a language is on your list of things to do, any one of us can find time to learn something new.

      Today, there are solutions that allow you to learn a language on your own time, and in the comforts of your own home.

      Which means finding the solution isn’t the problem, it’s finding the inner motivation inside of you to find the time to achieve what you deserve.

      More by this author

      Sean Kim

      Sean is the founder and CEO of Rype, a language learning app. He's an entrepreneur and blogger.

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      Last Updated on November 25, 2021

      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

      There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

      Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

        What Does Private Browsing Do?

        When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

        For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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        The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

        The Terminal Archive

        While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

        Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

        dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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        Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

        Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

        However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

        Clearing Your Tracks

        Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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        dscacheutil -flushcache

        As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

        Other Browsers and Private Browsing

        Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

        If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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        As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

        Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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