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5 Great Business Tips From Successful Entrepreneurs

5 Great Business Tips From Successful Entrepreneurs

Most people who are employees have thought of starting a business at some point in their lives. These people have a good idea of what the challenges are of starting a business. Even the simplest forms of businesses require true dedication, seriousness and proper planning. However, there are very few people who understand the emotional and sentimental association that an owner has with his/her business. Once you have owned a business for a couple of years, it is nearly impossible to let go of it just like that, even if you know it’s the best decision to take.

In simple words, you would never want to go through the pain of closing down a business. It is therefore highly recommended that you listen to the business advice given by people who have successfully run their businesses despite great hardships. These are the people who understand your passion, emotions and feelings. Their words can touch the very points that worry you about your business, established or startup. Here are some great pieces of advice coming from entrepreneurs who have been to the deeper side of the sea to tell you what it’s like there.

1. Be Wise When Choosing Friends

This particular advice comes from Tim Ferriss, who has his own TV show called The Tim Ferriss Experiment, and he is also a three times NYT bestselling author. He says that he always believed in the words of the great authors who said that a person is an average of his or her closest 5 people. The same people believe that the network of a person is that person’s net worth. It does not mean you have to make friends from your industry only. If you are in the IT field, you don’t have to be forced to make some experienced IT experts your friends. The point here is to find friends who encourage you to do good things rather than pulling you back from doing them.

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The people you are mostly surrounded by have a huge influence on you. If they mostly have a skeptical viewpoint of life, you will soon see your viewpoint conforming to theirs as well. Be around people with goals who are working to achieve something in their lives.

2. Be A Delegator

This particular thought not only haunts the business owners, but country leaders too. People who have spent their time and invested their efforts in creating a company are often very hesitant when it comes to delegating their responsibilities to others. Whitney Moerings from White Water Agency has gone through the same. When Whitney started her company it was her, who had done every single thing. Not only did she name her company and get it registered, but she even designed its logo and found the clients for it. She says that it is tough for a business owner to believe that someone would be able to take care of things like themselves.

It’s best to delegate responsibilities as soon as you feel the need to. Postponing this idea and constantly trying to manage it all by yourself will eventually overload you and cause burn outs.

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3. Don’t Accept the Failure

No matter how tough the circumstances are, there is always a way out of them. You can always renovate your strategies or business ideas when you think things are not working in your favor. However, the best entrepreneurs of the world agree on the fact that “no” is not an option when you want to achieve something big. The best example is of Sophia, the owner and founder of Nasty Gal. Nasty Gal started out as a store on eBay that was focused on selling clothes from the old times. The start was not very pleasing, but Sophia kept her patience and kept moving on.

Today, her business has transformed into a multi-million-dollar business despite the fact that she did not have any experience of the fashion industry before she started this store. She says there were people who kept saying no to her, but she kept her passion up and proved them wrong.

4. Know Your Customers in All Possible Ways

This particular advice comes from Tara Gentile. She is a recognized business strategist and entrepreneur who mentors owners of small and medium sized businesses on making the best out of their opportunities. She believes it is better for a business to know its best customers rather than focusing on a large group of people and managing to convert even less than 1%.

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She says that businesses should create their products and services with certain people in mind. They should then pitch these products and services to those chosen people rather than going after everyone. She thinks that business owners should not be thinking about people who might be interested in the product and rather create product that they know will definitely be bought by a certain group of people.

5. Don’t Be Comfortable

Sara Rotman is an advertising entrepreneur and she preaches to the world what she once learned from her accountant. She has an ad agency called the MODCo and some great names as her clients such as Tory Burch and Vera Wang. She says that she was in the middle of discussing her business plan when her accountant told her to not have too much cash for the business. The accountant thought that too much cash will put Sara in a comfortable position and the hunger to achieve more will be gone.

Sara took this advice and went with it as she started her business. She says that not having enough keeps her on her toes, and she thinks this keeps her motivated to do more for her business. In the simplest words, if you have enough cash to make you feel comfortable, you are bringing up an enemy in your own hands.

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All the people mentioned above are the recognized entrepreneurs in today’s world. All you need to know here is that they were all just like you before they became big people.

Featured photo credit: Business Advice Coming Right from the Successful Entrepreneurs via chha-nl.ca

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Last Updated on April 25, 2019

How to Write a Career Change Resume (With Examples)

How to Write a Career Change Resume (With Examples)

Shifting careers, tiny or big, can be paralyzing. Whether your desire for a career change is self-driven or involuntary, you can manage the panic and fear by understanding ‘why’ you are making the change.

Your ability to clearly and confidently articulate your transferable skills makes it easier for employers to understand how you are best suited for the job or industry.

A well written career change resume that shows you have read the job description and markets your transferable skills can increase your success for a career change.

3 Steps to Prepare Your Mind Before Working on the Resume

Step 1: Know Your ‘Why’

Career changes can be an unnerving experience. However, you can lessen the stress by making informed decisions through research.

One of the best ways to do this is by conducting informational interviews.[1] Invest time to gather information from diverse sources. Speaking to people in the career or industry that you’re pursuing will help you get clarity and check your assumptions.

Here are some questions to help you get clear on your career change:

  • What’s your ideal work environment?
  • What’s most important to you right now?
  • What type of people do you like to work with?
  • What are the work skills that you enjoy doing the most?
  • What do you like to do so much that you lose track of time?
  • Whose career inspires you? What is it about his/her career that you admire?
  • What do you dislike about your current role and work environment?

Step 2: Get Clear on What Your Transferable Skills Are[2]

The data gathered from your research and informational interviews will give you a clear picture of the career change that you want. There will likely be a gap between your current experience and the experience required for your desired job. This is your chance to tell your personal story and make it easy for recruiters to understand the logic behind your career change.

Make a list and describe your existing skills and experience. Ask yourself:

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What experience do you have that is relevant to the new job or industry?

Include any experience e.g., work, community, volunteer, or helping a neighbour. The key here is ANY relevant experience. Don’t be afraid to list any tasks that may seem minor to you right now. Remember this is about showcasing the fact that you have experience in the new area of work.

What will the hiring manager care about and how can you demonstrate this?

Based on your research you’ll have an idea of what you’ll be doing in the new job or industry. Be specific and show how your existing experience and skills make you the best candidate for the job. Hiring managers will likely scan your resume in less than 7 seconds. Make it easy for them to see the connection between your skills and the skills that are needed.

Clearly identifying your transferable skills and explaining the rationale for your career change shows the employer that you are making a serious and informed decision about your transition.

Step 3: Read the Job Posting

Each job application will be different even if they are for similar roles. Companies use different language to describe how they conduct business. For example, some companies use words like ‘systems’ while other companies use ‘processes’.

When you review the job description, pay attention to the sections that describe WHAT you’ll be doing and the qualifications/skills. Take note of the type of language and words that the employer uses. You’ll want to use similar language in your resume to show that your experience meets their needs.

5 Key Sections on Your Career Change Resume (Example)

The content of the examples presented below are tailored for a high school educator who wants to change careers to become a client engagement manager, however, you can easily use the same structure for your career change resume.

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Don’t forget to write a well crafted cover letter for your career change to match your updated resume. Your career change cover letter will provide the context and personal story that you’re not able to show in a resume.

1. Contact Information and Header

Create your own letterhead that includes your contact information. Remember to hyperlink your email and LinkedIn profile. Again, make it easy for the recruiter to contact you and learn more about you.

Example:

Jill Young

Toronto, ON | [email protected] | 416.222.2222 | LinkedIn Profile

2. Qualification Highlights or Summary

This is the first section that recruiters will see to determine if you meet the qualifications for the job. Use the language from the job posting combined with your transferable skills to show that you are qualified for the role.

Keep this section concise and use 3 to 4 bullets. Be specific and focus on the qualifications needed for the specific job that you’re applying to. This section should be tailored for each job application. What makes you qualified for the role?

Example:

Qualifications Summary

  • Experienced managing multiple stakeholder interests by building a strong network of relationships to support a variety of programs
  • Experienced at resolving problems in a timely and diplomatic manner
  • Ability to work with diverse groups and ensure collaboration while meeting tight timelines

3. Work Experience

Only present experiences that are relevant to the job posting. Focus on your specific transferable skills and how they apply to the new role.

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How this section is structured will depend on your experience and the type of career change you are making.

For example, if you are changing industries you may want to list your roles before the company name. However, if you want to highlight some of the big companies you’ve worked with then you may want to list the company name first. Just make sure that you are consistent throughout your resume.

Be clear and concise. Use 1 to 4 bullets to highlight your relevant work experiences for each job you list on your resume. Ensure that the information demonstrates your qualifications for the new job. Remember to align all the dates on your resume to the right margin.

Example:

Work Experience

Theater Production Manager 2018 – present

YourLocalTheater

  • Collaborated with diverse groups of people to ensure a successful production while meeting tight timelines

4. Education

List your formal education in this section. For example, the name of the degrees you received and the school who issued it. To eliminate biases, I would recommend removing the year you graduated.

Example:

Education

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  • Bachelor of Education, University of Western Ontario
  • Bachelor of Theater Studies with Honors, University of British Columbia

5. Other Activities or Interests

When you took an inventory of your transferable skills, what experiences were relevant to your new career path (that may not fit in the other resume sections?).

Example:

Other Activities

  • Mentor, Pathways to Education
  • Volunteer lead for coordinating all community festival vendors

Bonus Tips

Remember these core resume tips to help you effectively showcase your transferable skills:

  • CAR (Context Action Result) method. Remember that each bullet on your resume needs to state the situation, the action you took and the result of your experience.
  • Font. Use modern Sans Serif fonts like Tahoma, Verdana, or Arial.
  • White space. Ensure that there is enough white space on your resume by adjusting your margins to a minimum of 1.5 cm. Your resume should be no more than two pages long.
  • Tailor your resume for each job posting. Pay attention to the language and key words used on the job posting and adjust your resume accordingly. Make the application process easy on yourself by creating your own resume template. Highlight sections that you need to tailor for each job application.
  • Get someone else to review your resume. Ideally you’d want to have someone with industry or hiring experience to provide you with insights to hone your resume. However, you also want to have someone proofread your resume for grammar and spelling errors.

The Bottom Line

It’s essential that you know why you want to change careers. Setting this foundation not only helps you with your resume, but can also help you to change your cover letter, adjust your LinkedIn profile, network during your job search, and during interviews.

Ensure that all the content on your resume is relevant for the specific job you’re applying to.

Remember to focus on the job posting and your transferable skills. You have a wealth of experience to draw from – don’t discount any of it! It’s time to showcase and brand yourself in the direction you’re moving towards!

More Resources to Help You Change Career Swiftly

Featured photo credit: Parker Byrd via unsplash.com

Reference

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