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6 Signs You’re A Strong Person With Heightened Sensitivity

6 Signs You’re A Strong Person With Heightened Sensitivity

Society has made us believe that a strong person is someone who is fierce, has a stone for a heart, and doesn’t get moved by anything. In short, lacking sensitivity. But you may be surprised to know that it is very much possible to be both strong and sensitive. In fact, the strongest people may actually be the ones that are also highly sensitive.

Here are six signs that you are that unique kind of person, who is both strong and sensitive:

1. Life Sometimes Seems Too Much

You have to get to lecture on time, and you know that immediately afterwards you have to go work at the restaurant, yet not before you pick up your little sister from school. And all that while knowing that your midterm exam is tomorrow. Overwhelming? Well, some people may get absolutely crushed by all of this, while some will do it up without even snorting, or giving it a second glance. However, strong people with heightened sensitivity will feel both things at the same time. Kinda.

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Life can be overwhelming at times. The speed, the stress, the responsibility. People that are both strong and sensitive will easily feel crushed by the weight of it, but will also know that it won’t be enough to stop them. They know that if they fail, they can just get back up, and try again.

2. You’re Truthful, With Yourself and Others

At times, social interaction requires us to act a bit phony, to avoid conflicts and let the truth slide from under the carpet. But when it comes to strong highly sensitive people, they will not shy away from the truth, and in fact, will not even wince at presenting it to the crowd. They are sensitive to their friends and surroundings, but will know that covering up the truth will not help anyone, neither their friends, nor themselves.

3. You Require Meaningful Relationships

You are tired of going through the demanding dates. Dress well, act politely and charmingly, and overall being someone you’re not, waiting to present your true self as time goes by. You want to be honest about your thoughts and your feelings, you don’t want to make up meaningless conversations just for the comfort of conversing.

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Strong people with heightened sensitivity do not like being alone, but know that they need to stay strong enough and wait, if they want to find someone that they will enjoy as their company. Any less than that is unacceptable.

4. You Respect Yourself As Well As Others

A strong person with heightened sensitivity knows what he wants from others, and is also strong enough to know that he won’t take any less than that, even at the cost of pointing that out bluntly at the risk of confrontation. And of course, that person will not expect to have what he doesn’t give.

If you are a strong person with heightened sensitivity, you go by the ideology that you only give others, what you expect of them to give you. It comes by the fact that you hold high respect for yourself, as well as for the people surrounding you.

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5. Strong People With Heightened Sensitivity Make for Great Listeners

You’re talking with your friend, you can hear something strange in his voice, see something odd in his expression. Your heightened sensitivity allows you to catch on and realize that something is wrong. The act of listening does not end with hearing the other person’s words, it also includes reading his tone, and his mood. To read through the lines.

Your heightened sensitivity allows you to be empathetic about the situation, while your strong personality gives you a firm shoulder to weep and cry on. You are sensitive enough to relate to the situation, but also strong enough to keep your composure, making you a reassuring person. This is indeed a unique quality to have.

6. Bad Decisions Overburden You

Have you ever made a decision that you considered as “wrong”, or “bad”? You ran it through your head over and over again, thinking hard on every and each scenario, trying to figure what you could have done different. Well, it makes sense if you are a person with heightened sensitivity, since you take every respective consequence to heart.

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Yet, as a strong person, you realize that this will pass, and that it’s not at all a reason to halt your future endeavors. If anything, it will only help you improve next time, as you will learn much more from each badly made decision.

Being a strong person with heightened sensitivity is truly a rare quality.

Featured photo credit: Viktor Hanacek via picjumbo.com

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Last Updated on August 4, 2020

The Gentle Art of Saying No For a Less Stressful Life

The Gentle Art of Saying No For a Less Stressful Life

No!

It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments — you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time.

But requests for your time are coming in all the time — through phone, email, IM or in person. To stay productive, and minimize stress, you have to learn the Gentle Art of Saying No — an art that many people have problems with.

What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

But it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here’s how to master the Gentle Art of Saying No:

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1. Value Your Time

Know your commitments, and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it. And tell them that: “I just can’t right now … my plate is overloaded as it is.”

2. Know Your Priorities

Even if you do have some extra time (which for many of us is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time?

For myself, I know that more commitments means less time with my wife and kids, who are more important to me than anything.

3. Practice Saying No

Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word. And sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.

4. Don’t Apologize

A common way to start out is “I’m sorry but …” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm, and unapologetic about guarding your time.

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5. Stop Being Nice

Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. But if you erect a wall, they will look for easier targets.

Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.

6. Say No to Your Boss

Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss — they’re our boss, right? And if we say “no,” then we look like we can’t handle the work — at least, that’s the common reasoning.

But in fact, it’s the opposite — explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.

7. Pre-Empting

It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting,

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“Look guys, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”

8. Get Back to You

Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, simply tell them:

“After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.”

At least you gave it some consideration.

9. Maybe Later

If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say,

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“This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].”

Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands.

10. It’s Not You, It’s Me

This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often, the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time.

Simply say so — you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization … but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true — people can sense insincerity.

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Featured photo credit: Kyle Glenn via unsplash.com

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