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A Beginner’s Guide to Investing in Wine

A Beginner’s Guide to Investing in Wine

Experts say “invest in what you know.” Well for me, one of the things I know and love is wine. I’m sure the rest of you winos reading this understand. One thing that you might not have known until now, is that it is possible to make some money off of your love affair with this fermented beverage from the gods.

Investing in wine is certainly not a new concept, however, it is one that is trending a bit more now that a push to get more Americans investing has begun. Interest in the stock market has seen a significant drop given the economic rough patch our nation hit back in 2008. However, it remains an important part of building the high risk/high potential funds you need to supplement retirement savings.

If you’re a wino looking to diversify your investment portfolio with a commodity investment, investing in wine could be a good option. Here is a beginner’s guide to investing in wine that might help you determine whether or not it’s a solid prospect for your next addition to your portfolio.

1. Start a sufficient savings

As you probably already know, investing in wine isn’t quite as simple as heading to the store to purchase a bottle slightly above the price you’d already buy then waiting for it to grow in value. Determining how much you’re planning to invest in wine depends on whether you’re doing it for the love of wine or the potential for serious money.

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If you’d prefer to simply start collecting the wines you enjoy out of your pure love of wine, Investopedia recommends treating your collection like a baseball card or stamp collection where you pick up wines that interest you as you go. Although the payout might not be as grand this way, you could still end up with some delicious wines to drink if they don’t sell.

2. Be prepared to wait

When it comes to investing in wine, you have to be patient for the right time to buy. You have to carry out research on what vintages and wine producers have done well in the past and what is expected to happen in the future. For example, the past few vintages of Bordeaux wine have not been great and an investment could have been a bad decision. However, last year thanks to the “Rule of Fives”, this year is looking like a great year to invest in Bordeaux according to wine experts.

Unlike certain stock investments, wine can take a while to grow in value. Although this might seem like downfall for some investors, it actually could be a good thing for investors who are getting in the game early and have the precious gift of time on their sides.

According to MarketWatch, investments in wine can take 10-20 years to yield a return. If you’re looking to diversify your investments to supplement your retirement funds, this might not be an issue. If you’re looking for quick money, wine is probably not your best bet.

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    3. Look into professional storage options

    Storing wine that is intended for investment on your own is very risky. In order for wine to rise to its full potential, it must be stored at a temperature that is cool, but not too cool, in a dark area that doesn’t see much light, and away from shaking and excessive humidity. You could purchase a wine cooler, but experts in wine investing highly recommend professional storage in order to achieve higher perceived value upon selling. If you choose to go with a professional storage service, there are online guides that can help you find them in your area.

    If you choose to take the gamble and store your wines on your own, the Wine Spectator offers up a pretty solid guide to help you out.

    4. Purchase at least three bottles to get going

    According to Wine Folly, serious investors should plan to purchase at least three bottles to get started. These bottles should add up to at least $8,000 in value. This is recommended because when you consider the sizable cost of storing, insuring, and ultimately selling your wine, it becomes clearer that you should invest a sizable amount upfront to make the return worth the hassle.

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    But, as I also mentioned above, it’s possible that you’d prefer to take a more modest approach to investing in wine and treat your collection more like a passion project rather than a serious money maker. If this is the case, you’ll more than likely want to buy at your own discretion.

    5. Understand market risks

    As with all investments, investing in wine comes with a certain degree of risk. As a commodity investment, you might notice that the market is a bit more volatile than others due to industry changes. This is why diversification in your investment portfolio is so important. You simply cannot rely on one form of investing alone whether it be wine, stocks, or even your 401(k).

    As with any market you plan to enter, you should do your research to understand where the market for wine investment has been, where it currently sits, and where it might be headed in the future. This will give you a better idea of where your potential risks and benefits lie.

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      Now that you’ve got the basic information, does investing in wine sound like something you might be interested in adding to your investment portfolio? If so, use the resources throughout this post to learn a little more about the process. I might also recommend reaching out to an industry expert or two to find out how he or she got started and gather some professional insight. You never know, your love of wine could turn into a profitable skill if you play your cards right!

      Featured photo credit: perfectinsider via perfectinsider.com

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      Last Updated on April 3, 2019

      How to Nix Your Credit Card Debt in Less Than 3 Years

      How to Nix Your Credit Card Debt in Less Than 3 Years

      Debt is never a fun thing to be in. But, there are many actions that you can take that will help you rid yourself of the burden of debt once and for all.

      By coming up with a set plan, eliminating your debt can feel much easier than constantly thinking about it.

      This post will provide some tips on how you can do this to help you nix your credit card debt in less than 3 years.

      Hint: there are ways that are easier than you think.

      1. Consider Consolidating Multiple Credit Cards If Possible

      This may not be applicable to you, but if you have multiple cards – it is something to consider. Keeping up with multiple bills is time consuming.

      It will depend on the balance you have on each. Consolidate ones you can but do not do it to the point that you get too close to the maximum limit. Also, it is ideal to pick the card with the lower interest rate.

      Consider if there are any fees or alternatively, rewards, with transferring a balance to another card. Watch out for fees. Note that some cards offer rewards for transferring a balance to them. This is extra cash that can help go towards paying off your debt.

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      Having one or two cards can make nixing your debt much simpler than keeping up with the balance of a bunch of cards. Keeping track of paying the minimum towards a bunch of cards is time consuming. Spend the time to consolidate instead to make the overall process simpler going forward.

      My tip: Have one main credit card. Have a second one that you use for necessities – such as groceries or gas – that offers rewards for those purchases (a lot of cards do) and set the second one on auto-pay. You should be able to pay off a smaller amount on auto-pay if it is a necessity. If you think you cannot, then you may need to cut down a lot on expenses.

      Why do I suggest doing this? Having one thing set to auto-pay is one less thing to think about. One less thing to waste time on. Same idea with consolidating to one main card. Tracking down too many is a hassle.

      2. Try to Pay the Full Balance You Spent Each Month at the Very Least

      You need to pay off the amount you are spending each month when that bill comes in. This is the amount you spent THAT month.

      Do not let the debt keep accruing while you work on paying any unpaid debt that has accrued. It will become a never-ending battle. Try as best as you can to be current on paying for each month’s expenses when that month’s bill comes out.

      If this is a strain, consider why. You may need to cut expenses. Or you may need to consider other cards. Or look at where this money is going.

      3. Pay Extra When You Can – Every Small Amount Counts

      This cannot be emphasized enough. If you are looking at a lot of credit card debt, it can look daunting, but each extra amount that you can put towards the debt will really add up – no matter how small it is.

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      It does not just reduce the principal amount that you have left to pay off, but it reduces the amount that is collecting interest. You will always save money with that reduced interest.

      4. Create a Plan on How to Pay Extra

      Back to the main point, having this plan is giving you one less thing to think about.

      This plan should be a plan that works for you. If it does not work for you, your spending habits, and your views on debt, then it will not be an effective plan.

      For instance, if a set plan of an extra $50 (or another amount that you know you can afford) works for you, then do that. Set that aside every month and pay that extra amount. Treat it like a bill. Choose an amount that works for you and pay it like clockwork as though it was a bill you had to pay each month.

      Little amounts will not nix it entirely, but they will help tackle it and having a set plan can make it less of a chore. Creating a new plan of how much to put towards it each month is an unnecessary added stress.

      5. Cut out Costs for Services You Do Not Use

      If you are signed up for subscriptions that you do not use because of some free trial or for some other reason, cut it out. Your overall financial position will look better.

      In turn, that will make cutting your credit card debt easier. Look at your statements to find these expenses. If you do not use them, you may forget you are paying some unnecessary amount each month. Cutting it out can really add up in savings that you can put towards other needed expenses.

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      6. Get Aggressive About It

      Consider these points:

      Depending on the interest and the level of debt, you may need to give up a few indulgences. For example, instead of ordering delivery or going out to eat, cook at home. Everything adds up.

      Other things may be more of a sacrifice. It may be a trip you wanted to go on, or a daily latte habit you’ve picked up. In these instances, consider how important it is to you and if it’s worth the sacrifice. And if it is a costly expense, think whether you can wait to indulge.

      Cutting an extravagant expense can really help make a dent in your overall debt. Try not to add to debt when you are trying to pay it off. It will be a never-ending battle. Make it less of a battle with these tips and it will feel easier.

      Bottom line: Do what you can to make this process easier for you. Implement steps that do this. It takes time now, but will help overall. Also, keep track of your spending and paying down of your debts. Which is the next point.

      7. Reevaluate Your Progress at Set Intervals

      Doing a regular check-in can help you see your efforts pay off or maybe indicate that you need to give this a bit more effort. If you check every 3-6 months, it will not feel so much like a chore or feel so daunting.

      By doing this, you will be able to better understand your progress and perhaps readjust your plan. Bonus: if you see it pay off, it will feel great to do this check-in. You will get there.

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      Finally (and most importantly)…

      8. Keep Trying

      Do not get discouraged. Pushing it off will make it worse. Just keep trying.

      Once your debt becomes lower, each monthly payment will reduce the balance more. Why? You are paying less towards interest. It will be a snowball effect eventually and it will become much easier to manage. Just get to that point. And know once you do, it will feel easier and motivating.

      Start Knocking out Your Debt Today

      The best way to eliminate debt is to get started right away. Begin by implementing the above steps and watch your debt just melt away. Try out some of the above strategies and see what works best for you. Soon you’ll be on your way to a debt free life.

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      Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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