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7 Subtle Signs Telling You’re Not Only In The Mood, But May Have Depression

7 Subtle Signs Telling You’re Not Only In The Mood, But May Have Depression

People look at depression so lightly these days, mixing or confusing it with simply being moody. But truth is, the two terms are worlds apart from each other, and so are their effects on your mental, as well as your physical state. There’s even a chance that those who believe themselves to be moody, may actually suffer from mild, all the way to severe depression.

It is important to identify one’s own mental state so to treat it efficiently, and accordingly. If you have an doubts of whether you are depressed or not, the following signs may help you confirm or refute them:

1. You Have a Short Fuse

You’ve been awfully irritated lately. Your roommate asks about your morning, and you answer back with a grunt, your co-worker tells you about what he did last night, and you scorn at his attempt converse, giving everyone the impression that you’re a moody nerve bomb. And all that while you ask yourself, deeply, why did you have to react that way?

Well, all of this could actually be the result of depression, rather than a bad mood. It can make a person, rather than feel sad and hopeless, feel irritated and angry. If you feel like you’re easily ticked off, it could be a sign of depression.

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2. Changes in Your Sleeping Pattern

You get into bed, tired, exhausted really, trying to get into a comfortable position. You turn from side to side, cover yourself with the blanket only to remove it half way a few moments later. In short, you are already aware that this will be one of those practically sleepless nights.

Or rather, you do fall asleep, instantly like a baby, only to find that when the wrenched alarm clock rings devilishly, you cannot seem to be able and wake up. Still exhausted, even after your nine hours sleep. And even if you do manage to somehow persuade yourself away from bed, you quickly find that there’s not much else you’d like to do more than going back to bed again.

While these two extreme phenomenons can be confused with simply having a night, if they consist more than a day or two, you may be suffering from depression, which can also be the cause of a sleep problem.

3. You’re Experiencing Physical Pain

Your head aches? Your back is in pain? And all that without no apparent reason? Well, before you start googling your symptoms and end up diagnosing yourself with cancer, the simple answer may just be that you are suffering from… you know it, depression.

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Pain and mood are both influenced by the same neurotransmitters, and so it is not out of the question that being in the state of grave depression, will actually affect you physically.

Even your body is not spared from the painful clutches of depression.

4. You Are Lacking Energy

Another common symptom includes physical fatigue. Lack of energy doesn’t only mean that you don’t feel like going to the gym today, it even affects your minor activities, from going up the stairs to bending down to pick up that pencil you dropped.

This exhaustion should not be dismissed for lack of sleep or simply being moody. Depression is a burden, and a lasting toll on your body, while a bad mood hardly affects you physically.

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5. You Are Beating Yourself Down

People with depression can actually feel their self worth diminishing, and when that happens, they will practically blame themselves for anything. It can be that fight you had with a friend a day ago, all the way to that argument you had with your brother back in the 90’s.

It doesn’t matter if your logical side is telling you that you were on the right, you will still feel an overburdening guilt that will be hard to shake away. This one is actually very easy to differentiate from a bad mood, for a moody person would probably blame others, rather than himself.

6. You Are Reckless

Depression is a burden, and it constantly weighs on you mentally. It is only natural that one will try to mask that unpleasant feeling using exterior stimulation. And we all know that the best stimulates are also the riskiest. It could be ranged from gambling all the way to the substance abuse.

Risky acts will provide momentary relief, but soon enough depression will hit back several times harder, and so this is why a depressed person may enter himself into a loop, all so to forget the turmoil that is inside of him. Being moody can make you sulky, but it definitely will not lead one to this circle of self consuming.

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7. Depression Fogs Concentration

Another symptom that can be easily confused with lack of sleep, but as you probably already guessed, it can also be a sign of depression. Concentration takes self peace and silence, two things that people with depression will find hard to face. Silence only makes it easier to feel the burden in one’s chest.

This lack of concentration can make you either forget or misplace things around the house, or hinder your general productivity. A bad mood, unlike depression, does not affect your mental functions to such extent.

Featured photo credit: Viktor Hanacek via picjumbo.com

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Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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