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8 Effective Ways To Boost Your Brain Power

8 Effective Ways To Boost Your Brain Power

The brain is an integral part of us which we don’t know much about. As a result, we’re unknowingly neglecting and degenerating it. Studies on how to increase brain power are being heavily researched upon because what we know about our brains is just the tip of the iceberg. Unlock the full potential of your brain, and life will never be the same again.

While we continue to dream of the endless abilities that come with a brain working at full potential, here are 8 ways that you can effectively boost your brain power right now!

1. Keeping Your Blood Sugar Level Balanced

Headaches are usually dismissed as a common problem which will subside eventually, but we rarely know what is the cause of it. However, by keeping your blood sugar level balanced, you’ll be saving your brain’s white matter which are the areas where nerves speak to one another.

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According to Joseph C. Masdeu, MD, PhD, of the Houston Methodist Neurological Institute, by having a high blood sugar level all the time, you risk damaging the blood vessels in your brain which will in turn, affect the white matter.

2. Eat Enough Essential Fatty Acids

By not eating enough essential fatty acids, we run a higher risk of getting neurological problems such as dementia, depression, and even schizophrenia. This is because our brain cell membranes are derived from these fatty acids, so does 60% of our brain mass.

In order to ensure that you have a healthy and functioning brain, you’re encouraged to take more fatty fish such as cod, salmon, sardines or tuna. You can also find these good fats in coconut oil, olive oil or avocado oil.

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3. Reduce Your Stress Level

Stress releases a hormone called cortisol which is secreted by the adrenal gland. By being constantly stressed, you could be doing more damage to your brain than you think. According to Joe Herbert M.B Ph.D, too much cortisol damages the hippocampus which is in charge of you memory.

Too much cortisol production inhibits the hippocampus from creating new nerve cells and this can lead to Alzheimer’s disease.

4. Stimulating Your Brain

According to Murali Doraiswamy who writes for the Scientific American, brain games do help to stimulate the brain and make it more resilient to degeneration. In one of the best studies to date, 487 adults aged 67 to 93 were made to go through a brain fitness program. The brain training group reported better results than the control group with improved confidence, better recall of shopping lists and being able to hold a conversation in a noisy setting.

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5. Reduce Inflammation To Your Brain

When our body is fighting against a virus or a bacteria that has entered our system, our immune system is activated by what is called a Gut Associated Lymphoid Tissues (GALT) which as its name suggest, lies in the area around our gut. Inflammatory mediators are then released by GALT which can create systemic inflammation, causing the protection around our neurons to deteriorate.

In the long term, our neurons will weaken due to these inflammations. To reduce this, it is best to eat a healthy diet of vegetables, fruits and nuts.

6. Drink Green Tea

You’ll be surprised that drinking this easily consumable tea can boost your brain power tremendously. Green tea catechins, which is an antioxidant have been proven to reduce cognitive dysfunction and improve your memory. Studies done by the Justus-Liebig-University of Giessen in Germany, also showed that green tea can help to improve focus and attention.

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7. Exercise

Maybe you’ve heard this many times, but physical exercise is also one of the keys on how to increase brain power. A study done by the department of exercise sciences at the University of Georgia concluded that just 20 minutes of exercise can help facilitate information processing and memory functions. A UCLA study also showed that exercise can help increase the growth factors of our brain.

8. Have Adequate Sleep

Most people have the common perception that when we sleep, our brain sleeps. But in actual fact, our brain is pretty much awake at certain times during our sleep. One important thing that our brain does when we are physically asleep, is to  have its toxins cleared out. The glymphatic system which is like our body’s waste system helps clear out our brain’s toxins. Have too little sleep, and your body will not clear out the toxins fast enough which could be one main factors leading to Alzheimer’s disease.

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Lim Kairen

Content Writer

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Last Updated on February 24, 2021

How to Find Workout Motivation When You Hate Exercise

How to Find Workout Motivation When You Hate Exercise

It’s easy to fall into a mindset where you hate exercise. It does, indeed, demand a lot from you. You have to use special clothes, develop a routine and exercise habit, get out of the comfort of your own home, and wear yourself out to the point where you just want to collapse into bed. Fortunately, while there are a lot of reasons to dislike exercise, there are even more reasons to love it.

If you want to stop hating exercises and making excuses to avoid it, here’s how to tackle each one of those exercise excuses, get into action, and give your body the attention it craves.

1. You Don’t Have to Exercise 30 Minutes Each Day to Get Results

Most of us have a number that we think we should hit in order to exercise “enough.” For some people, this is the daily recommended minimum of 30 minutes. For others, it’s 45 minutes of weight-training plus another 45 minutes of cardio.

I’m not going to put up a fight with your number here. What I am going to do is challenge your idea of starting with that number right away. You see, even though 30 minutes a day might not seem like a lot, 30 minutes a day for the next 5 years is actually too much for your habitual brain to process.

So yes, everyone can do 30 minutes of daily exercise for one week. But how many people can do that for the next 5 years?

Starting small has the advantage of bypassing your brain’s fight-or-flight response, the mechanism that make you sabotage yourself when you are trying to do something that seems “big” for too long and makes you hate exercise.

This way, instead of mindlessly starting with an exercise program, you focus on building the habit first, and then once you are exercising a little bit every day, you are ready to expand how much exercise you do.

2. You Don’t Have to Force Yourrself to Do It

If you have to force yourself to do it, then there is a 90% chance that you are doing it wrong, and you will never stick to exercise.

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Some people are motivated by challenges and others pushing them, while others hate it.

If you are one of the people who hate it, stop trying to change yourself, and of course, stop treating yourself as if you were one of those people who are motivated by challenges and being pushed. The more you use this approach on yourself, the more you’ll hate exercise and avoid it in the long term.

Instead, change the way you approach exercise. Stop falling into what I call the “Happiness Paradox Trap.” Instead of starting with what you think you “should do,” start with what feels good.

Maybe weight lifting and running aren’t your thing, but have you tried Zumba or Pilates classes? Maybe you hate the feel of a gym, so try getting into cycling instead. Don’t feel that there’s one right way to go about it, and do your best to make it your own.

3. You Can Regain Motivation Easily

We think that motivation is the answer to sticking to exercise. If only we wanted it enough, then we would make it happen.

However, motivation is always there. If you feel you wish you exercised more, then you are motivated to exercise. If you are not doing it, it’s not because you are not motivated. It’s because something stops you.

It might be the activated fight-or-flight response we talked about in #1. For example, when you feel that you have too much to do, the fight-or-flight response kicks in, and you do nothing.

People who have already made exercise a daily ritual don’t depend on boosting their motivation to get off the couch and exercise. They just do it, naturally, without debating it with themselves, desperately trying to get themselves into action.

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Maybe you think you need to devote 1 hour and you don’t know how to do that. Or, maybe you think you need to suffer to get results. Whatever the real reason is, find it. Only then will you be able to figure out a way to remove the obstacle that is on your way.

4. You Do Need Exercise to Lose Weight

Many people only care about their weight. Yet, our bodies are naturally wired to feel good when we move. Here is a quick list of the benefits of exercise:

  • Decreases the risk of various diseases and bad health conditions, like high cholesterol, diabetes, stroke, certain types of cancer, arthritis, and cardiovascular diseases.
  • Increases longevity. Many research studies support the fact that exercise can reverse some signs of aging and reduce chances of death by any cause.[1]
  • Improves mood. Exercise does not just help depressed people; it helps everyone, even those who hate exercise. A quick workout or walk stimulates various brain chemicals that may leave you feeling happier and more relaxed.
  • Increases your energy levels. Regular physical activity boosts your endurance and helps your heart and lungs work more efficiently. And yes, that means more energy available for you.
  • Improves sleep. Regular physical activity can help you sleep better and fall asleep more easily, as long as you don’t exercise a couple of hours prior to bedtime.
  • Improves sex life. Erectile dysfunction? Lack of libido? Just lack of energy? Exercise may help with all of that.
  • Helps you better control your weight. Exercise helps you burn calories, plus you build muscle that generally burns more calories than fat. Exercise is a great add-on to a diet or weight maintenance plan.
  • Gets you better lab results, even if you are overweight. Did you know that an obese person who is fit, i.e., exercises regularly, will show better lab results than a thin person who never exercises?

5. Exercise Doesn’t Require All of Your Attention

Maybe you are currently busy with your work life, or you are planning a trip next week. Maybe your child just got sick and needs your constant attention. Shouldn’t you just wait until you can give exercise 100% of your attention?

This rationale once again sounds plausible, but just like the “I don’t have time” excuse, is it really true? Is not starting because you are not “ready” the best thing for you right now? Is neglecting yourself and your body for a few more weeks/months/years a good strategy?

Finally, how many months or years will you spend before you get all your ducks in a row?

6. Exercise Can Be Interesting

Most advice in response to this excuse tells you to find something that you actually like. Yet, I know that for most people, exercise itself is rarely the thing that makes you hate exercise. Having to do it for “too long” is the issue.

That’s why I said that if 30 minutes are boring, try 5 or 10.

Now, if this idea of starting small stresses you out, let me remind you the wisdom of #1–the fact that you may want to be exercising one hour a day doesn’t mean you have to start from one hour right away. You can start small, and as you feel more and more comfortable, build your way up.

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Getting into a fitness program or hiring a personal trainer for a couple of weeks can also help you find a routine that interests you.

7. You Can Rewrite the Negative Past Experiences

I understand that you came last at the sprint race when you were at school. I understand that you may feel embarrassed when you attend fitness classes. Luckily, your past does not need to define your future.

A client of mine wanted to start jogging. She started by walking around the neighborhood. Yet, she found out she felt really uncomfortable feeling that her neighbors were watching her.

She accepted that, and worked her way around it. Instead of walking around her own block, she walked around the block next to her own block, and the problem was solve. A few months later, she was already jogging 2 miles a couple of times a week.

8. Exercise Doesn’t Need To Be a Hassle

If you think you need to exercise for an hour, take a shower, and drive to the gym and back, then you have two hours gone, just like that. You might like moving your body, but you certainly don’t like having to spend all this time working out!

Luckily, exercise that gets you results doesn’t have to take all this time and scheduling brainpower.

To start, you could do something that takes less time and planning, like exercising at home. You may feel more comfortable if you get to work out within sight of your comfy sofa instead of driving 20 minutes to the nearest gym.

You can also try automating. For example, if you go to the gym after work, make sure your gym bag is ready from the day before, so you don’t have to deal with that during your busy morning.

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9. You Do Have Enough Time to Exercise

Even though we know people busier than us who actually exercise, we keep saying we are “too busy,” and we hate exercise for making us even busier.

Have you ever thought that being “busy” is actually a lie? If there are busier people than you who make it happen, then so could you. Yet, even though we acknowledge that, we still believe it’s true.

It’s time to admit that time is not the main issue. It’s probably the way your are prioritizing things, and you are afraid you’ll have to give up something else in favor of exercise. Whatever the real reason, you need to find it if you want to give your body a chance to thrive.

If you don’t know where to start when finding time to exercise, check out Lifehack’s free 4 Step Guide to Creating More Time Out of a Busy Schedule.

10. Exercise Will Not Take Time Away From Other Things

You might be worried that exercise will take too much of your time, or that you’ll need to give up another hobby or time with your family to do it.

If you don’t want to hate exercise, you must first stop making it the enemy. If it is the thing that will “stop you” from doing other things, you’ll likely never convince yourself that it’s worth it.

However, if exercise becomes the thing that will help you become healthier, be more active for your kids, and focus more at work, it then becomes a necessity that you’re willing to make room for in your life.

The Bottom Line

It can often feel natural to hate exercise. Life is already demanding a lot from us, and exercise is just one more thing we have to squeeze in. However, once you realize all of the benefits you can receive from it, it will feel less like a chore and more like the part of your day you look most forward to.

More on Getting Into the Exercise Habit

Featured photo credit: Minna Hamalainen via unsplash.com

Reference

[1] Maturitas: Exercise and longevity

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