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Stray Puppy Joined A Marathon Race That Humans Found Challenging, And Found Her Pal For Life

Stray Puppy Joined A Marathon Race That Humans Found Challenging, And Found Her Pal For Life

Sometimes in life we need a little support, but when extreme marathon runner Dion Leonard headed to the Gobi desert for his next big challenge, he got his support from an unexpected friend.

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    An Unexpected Running Partner

    It was during the 6-day gruelling race, around 20 miles in from the start, that Dion noticed a new competitor by his side – a small homeless dog. Much to his surprise, the canine runner stayed by his side for 22 miles until the finish line.

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    But it doesn’t stop there – at the start line on day 2, up trotted the pup ready for the day’s 23-mile slog through the desert which she did happily by Dion’s side.

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      Loyal From Start To Finish

      It was clear a special partnership had been formed – and not only through the tough terrain. After crossing the finish line, the friendly mutt wouldn’t part ways with the marathon runner from Scotland, opting to stay by his side while bedding down for camp, both keeping each other company until the next day’s racing. The pair were officially inseparable. It was at this point that Dion decided to name his new furry friend, and what a more fitting name than Gobi.

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        Exhausted But Still Supportive

        Was the little pooch ready to give up? Absolutely not. Day 3 saw her, again, supporting her new human friend through the 26-mile marathon and completing the race right by his side.

        “For a little dog Gobi certainly has a big heart and some pace to match,” said Dion.

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          Time For A Rest, But Still As Supportive As Ever

          The next two days were too hot for Gobi to run and while Dion missed her, Gobi was taken to both finish lines to greet him with open paws (and a lick).

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            Big Achievements For A Little Dog And Her New Human

            On day 6, Gobi was back in action and ran the last leg of the strenuous event with Dion both crossing the finish line together and receiving their well-deserved medals.

            And of course it doesn’t end there. Dion knows a good thing when he sees it – he was so touched by Gobi’s support and loyalty that he decided to go through the lengthy and expensive process of adopting her and bringing her home to Scotland as his faithful pet.

            With hundreds of donations pouring in to make sure this becomes a reality for the new best friends, the two runners will soon reunite and no doubt look forward to many runs in their new life together.

            Featured photo credit: 4deserts.com via 4deserts.com

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            Jenny Marchal

            Freelance Writer

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            Last Updated on December 2, 2018

            7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

            7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

            When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

            You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

            1. Connecting them with each other

            Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

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            It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

            2. Connect with their emotions

            Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

            For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

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            3. Keep going back to the beginning

            Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

            On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

            4. Link to your audience’s motivation

            After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

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            Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

            5. Entertain them

            While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

            Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

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            6. Appeal to loyalty

            Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

            In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

            7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

            Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

            Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

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