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8 Essential Tips for Purchasing Headsets

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8 Essential Tips for Purchasing Headsets

With so many choices of technological products available, purchasing something electronic can be overwhelming and confusing. How do you know what is a good value for the money you want to spend? How do you know what to get?

You can talk with sales representatives at brick-and-mortar stores, but they might steer you in the direction of the costliest item to pad their commission or they might confuse you more by the jargon they use. You can search for information on the Internet, but that could incorrect. Here are some points to consider when buying headsets.

1. Call Quality

Headsets can sound great in the ear but transmit with a computerized version of your voice to the listener. When you are looking at headsets, read reviews on call quality to ensure you get the best sound for your investment. Call quality is important. Although some big names have produced good quality, smaller, and prettier models sound as good as the big guys.

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2. Noise Cancellation

So many people need to eliminate noise around them for a number of reasons. If the headsets do not have the capability to suppress noise or the function is faulty, these are not the ones you want to purchase. How well you can be heard when you’re in a speeding car with the windows down, or in the middle of a noisy conference room, can quickly separate the good performers from the bad.

Look for those headsets that contain more than one microphone because one microphone is dedicated to finding ambient noise. The headset then cancels that noise using DSP algorithms. Many brands on the market do a good job cancelling the extra sounds. The better headsets will ensure the quality of your voice is the same while muting background noise.

3. Battery Life

Everyone knows how frustrating it can be to lose power in a battery when you are being entertained. Therefore, you need to find that headset that holds onto battery life. If you don’t want to charge, go large. Some of the bulkier, less fashionable headsets can last for more than 10 hours on a single charge; the more expensive ones can last about six hours. Some will use up the battery quick ‒ in less than two hours.

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4. Comfort

The whole point of a headset is to wear it on your head. That’s why you should make sure the headset you buy is comfortable to wear for a long time. Some models sit partially in your ear. Although some people do not find this comfortable, others see it as a secure fit without being tight. Other brands will site on the edge of the ear or use ear hooks to balance the weight.

5. Style

Everyone has a personal style. Just like clothes, headsets come in a number of styles and types. To find the best-looking headset that fits your style, you need to consider all options. Some have nice designs while others use color and fabric to make the headsets look bold. These styles are likely to reduce unwanted stares.

6. Range

There’s not much variation in range of operation. Most headsets are limited to a theoretical range of 33 feet. You are probably going to get a good 10 to 15 feet before you have problems. Some headsets will reach 20 feet and around a wall or two before this happens.

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If you’re looking at a more robust headset for telecom or corporate use, pick the ones that have its DECT 6.0-based wireless technology in lieu of Bluetooth, delivers significantly more range, and very clear, DSP-enhanced sound quality.

7. Mono vs. Stereo Sound

You can choose to have the sounds come into both ears or one. Although most headsets fit in one ear, you can purchase models that will play the sounds in stereo so you can hear your music. Die-hard audiophiles should stick with wired earphones for the best sound quality. But if you want convenience, you should go with a stereo Bluetooth set because it does double duty: taking calls and playing music.

8. Price

Every consumer wants the highest quality for the lowest price. Most people will choose headsets around the $100 mark with some rebates or discounts that bring the price to $70 or $80. You might find a decent headset for under $50. You also might be able to get a cheap one that has been discontinued but is still available. To get the cheaper versions, you will have to settle for the clunky type with noise cancellation that isn’t good and other issues.

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Featured photo credit: 9TO5MAC via 9to5mac.com

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Last Updated on November 25, 2021

How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

    What Does Private Browsing Do?

    When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

    For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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    The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

    The Terminal Archive

    While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

    Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

    dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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    Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

    Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

    However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

    Clearing Your Tracks

    Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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    dscacheutil -flushcache

    As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

    Other Browsers and Private Browsing

    Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

    If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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    As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

    Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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