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Your Personality May Be Controlled By Your Immune System, Study Finds

Your Personality May Be Controlled By Your Immune System, Study Finds

Despite the social and geopolitical tensions that exist in today’s society, the human race has evolved to a point where multiculturalism and interactivity between different creeds is entirely normal. While there are many inspirational stories concerning those who have battled oppression to practice their beliefs, in general, we live in a tolerant and accepting world.

Interestingly, animals have also evolved over time and become increasingly sociable, particularly in environments where one species is dominant. The same can be said for species’ with high populations such as rats and mice, many of which are often forced to coexist in small, urban spaces.

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What recent studies have told us about the evolution of sociability

In instances such as this, however, this heightened level of interaction can increase each animal’s chances of coming into contact with pathogens and infections. Over time, this has driven the need for animals to develop stronger and more capable immune systems, with historical research suggesting that environmental changes were most likely to alter the course of their development.

While this makes perfect sense, a new generation of researchers from the University of Virginia have discovered that the immune system of some species actively controls the elements of their brain that are responsible for social behaviour. This may ultimately change the way that we think about evolution and development, as the rise in sociability may actually have occurred as a direct result of heightened immune systems (rather than the other way around).

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How your Personality is controlled by your Immune System

According to the most recent studies, mice that were bred without a specific pathogen-fighting immune molecule became anti-social over time, while also displaying other prominent social defects such as autism. Upon further examination of the subject’s brain activity during testing, it was revealed that particular brain regions in the prefrontal cortex that control social behaviour had become hyperactive, which is similar to the experiences of humans with autism.

Conversely, when these subjects were injected with the missing immune molecule, they immediately behaved in a far healthier manners without displaying any social abnormalities. In purely scientific terms, this increased the levels of a prominent neurotransmitter called GABA, which in turn alleviated the subjects’ hyperactivity and triggered a chance in their social tendencies.

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The Last Word

In summary, this fascinating discovery has changed the way that scientists think about the brain and its relationship to the immune system (in the case of both animals and humans). Whereas the brain and the adaptive immune system were once considered to be isolated from one another, it is now apparent that these two entities actually share a close and interactive connection. It is also clear that our immune system has a direct influence on our personality type, and particularly the way in which we socialise and interact with others.

In the long-term, this discovery may also impact on the way in which immune activity in the brain is observed in humans. This was once seen as a clear sign of pathology, but this is no longer the case given the recent findings meaning that diagnostics and treatments could change accordingly.

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Featured photo credit: Terry White / Flickr via flickr.com

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Last Updated on August 16, 2018

10 Ways To Step Out Of Your Comfort Zone And Enjoy Taking Risks

10 Ways To Step Out Of Your Comfort Zone And Enjoy Taking Risks

The ability to take risks by stepping outside your comfort zone is the primary way by which we grow. But we are often afraid to take that first step.

In truth, comfort zones are not really about comfort, they are about fear. Break the chains of fear to get outside. Once you do, you will learn to enjoy the process of taking risks and growing in the process.

Here are 10 ways to help you step out of your comfort zone and get closer to success:

1. Become aware of what’s outside of your comfort zone

What are the things that you believe are worth doing but are afraid of doing yourself because of the potential for disappointment or failure?

Draw a circle and write those things down outside the circle. This process will not only allow you to clearly identify your discomforts, but your comforts. Write identified comforts inside the circle.

2. Become clear about what you are aiming to overcome

Take the list of discomforts and go deeper. Remember, the primary emotion you are trying to overcome is fear.

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How does this fear apply uniquely to each situation? Be very specific.

Are you afraid of walking up to people and introducing yourself in social situations? Why? Is it because you are insecure about the sound of your voice? Are you insecure about your looks?

Or, are you afraid of being ignored?

3. Get comfortable with discomfort

One way to get outside of your comfort zone is to literally expand it. Make it a goal to avoid running away from discomfort.

Let’s stay with the theme of meeting people in social settings. If you start feeling a little panicked when talking to someone you’ve just met, try to stay with it a little longer than you normally would before retreating to comfort. If you stay long enough and practice often enough, it will start to become less uncomfortable.

4. See failure as a teacher

Many of us are so afraid of failure that we would rather do nothing than take a shot at our dreams.

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Begin to treat failure as a teacher. What did you learn from the experience? How can you take that lesson to your next adventure to increase your chance of success?

Many highly successful people failed plenty of times before they succeeded. Here’re some examples:

10 Famous Failures to Success Stories That Will Inspire You to Carry On

5. Take baby steps

Don’t try to jump outside your comfort zone, you will likely become overwhelmed and jump right back in.

Take small steps toward the fear you are trying to overcome. If you want to do public speaking, start by taking every opportunity to speak to small groups of people. You can even practice with family and friends.

Take a look at this article on how you can start taking baby steps:

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The Number One Secret to Life Success: Baby Steps

6. Hang out with risk takers

There is no substitute for this step. If you want to become better at something, you must start hanging out with the people who are doing what you want to do and start emulating them. (Here’re 8 Reasons Why Risk Takers Are More Likely To Be Successful).

Almost inevitably, their influence will start have an effect on your behavior.

7. Be honest with yourself when you are trying to make excuses

Don’t say “Oh, I just don’t have the time for this right now.” Instead, be honest and say “I am afraid to do this.”

Don’t make excuses, just be honest. You will be in a better place to confront what is truly bothering you and increase your chance of moving forward.

8. Identify how stepping out will benefit you

What will the ability to engage in public speaking do for your personal and professional growth? Keep these potential benefits in mind as motivations to push through fear.

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9. Don’t take yourself too seriously

Learn to laugh at yourself when you make mistakes. Risk taking will inevitably involve failure and setbacks that will sometimes make you look foolish to others. Be happy to roll with the punches when others poke fun.

If you aren’t convinced yet, check out these 6 Reasons Not to Take Life So Seriously.

10. Focus on the fun

Enjoy the process of stepping outside your safe boundaries. Enjoy the fun of discovering things about yourself that you may not have been aware of previously.

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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