Advertising
Advertising

Is Antibiotic Abuse Murdering Our Future & Your Part to Playing Antibiotic Stewardship

Is Antibiotic Abuse Murdering Our Future & Your Part to Playing Antibiotic Stewardship

Modern medicine has given us antibiotics, our go-to-first line of defense. They are not for viruses like common cold or a flu but when you are down with something serious like pneumonia, bronchitis, etc, there is a need for something serious; something potent to kill of the bacteria and get well.

The problem is that bacteria have become increasingly resistant to antibiotics, making the antibiotics that you readily get from your doctor less effective. Antibiotic resistance occurs when targeted bacteria show resistance to an antibiotic, continuing to thrive and multiply, even in the presence of an antibiotic’s therapeutic levels.

What is selective pressure in antibiotic resistance?

Selective pressure is an antibiotic influence on natural selection where susceptible bacteria, or those having low chance of survival, are killed or inhibited by the antibiotic while the resistant strains of bacteria are allowed to survive. However, sometimes, the natural selection to promote resistance to antibiotics is influenced at a low level without human action – bacteria have the ability to produce and use antibiotics against other bacteria.

Nonetheless, today’s higher level of antibiotic resistance is solely due to antibiotic abuse or overuse. It’s common in some countries to purchase antibiotics over the counter or take unnecessary dosages to treat viral illnesses, such as the common cold.

Advertising

A matter of concern

Whether it is about protecting people from different classes of bacteria or saving countless number of lives since the first antibiotic (penicillin) was clinically used in the 1940s, antibiotics have a significant attribution in the human health history. However, their efficacy has become vulnerable, giving rise to drug-resistant bacteria.

Much of the effectiveness of antibiotics is threatened in the modern food animal industry by the use of low doses of antimicrobials for faster growth of livestock and poultry animals, and to compensate for unhygienic environments they are raised in. This encourages bacteria to resist drugs, and such drug-resistant bacteria come in contact with the general public, either through food, animal or human carriers.

1 death every 3 seconds all around the world

This is a dangerous statistic which will soon become a reality by 2050 if countries don’t take immediate action to control antibiotic resistance. ResistanceMap, a highly visual and interactive online platform, shows the current trends in antibiotic resistance around the globe, including the USA, Europe, and low & middle income countries (LMICs):

  • USA: 2 million serious illnesses, 23,000 deaths, $20 billion additional annual medical costs
  • Europe: 25,000 deaths, €1.5 billion direct and indirect annual costs (EMA and ECDC 2009)
  • India: 58,000 neonatal sepsis deaths (Laxminarayan et al. 2013)
  • Tanzania and Mozambique: Increasing deaths of neonates and children under 5 (Kayange et al. 2010; Roca et al. 2008)
  • Worldwide: 935,000 deaths of children under 5 due to pneumonia (2013)

The 2000-10 data of 71 countries reveals that global antibiotic consumption has grown from 50 billion to nearly 70 billion standard units, which is more than a 30% increase. Eighty percent of antibiotics are used in the community of most nations, whether prescribed by healthcare providers or not, and 20% are used in hospitals and other facilities (Kotwani and Holloway 2011).

Advertising

The Journal of the American Medical Association’s new report concludes that doctor’s offices, clinics and emergency rooms in the USA prescribe 30% unnecessary antibiotics.

Rare antibiotic resistant E. coli “superbug” detected for the first time

“The medicine cabinet is empty for some patients,” said Dr. Tom Frieden, director of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). “It is the end of the road unless we act urgently.”

Frieden recently signaled a warning sign for the USA when rare mutant Colistin-resistent E. coli was found in a 49-year-old Pennsylvania woman at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. Colistin is a last resort antibiotic most physicians use when all other antibiotics don’t work against a bacteria. A similar strain of the antibiotic resistant bacteria was found in a pig intestine by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).

There is the danger of a potentially unstoppable superbug being produced if Colistin-resistent E. coli interacts with other bacteria that only respond to Colistin.

Advertising

The CDC reports a minimum 2 million cases of infection from other antibiotic resistant bacteria each year and 23,000 consequent deaths to say the least. World Health Organization (WHO) warns about one of the biggest threats to global health due to antibiotic resistance.

10 superbugs which can cause 10 million deaths each year

  1. Gonorrhea  350,000 cases in the USA in 2014, shows resistance to 5 common antibiotics. The sexually transmitted disease now shows resistance to the only two antibiotics left to treat it, i.e. azithromycin and ceftriaxone, according to CDC. There is an overall increase in sexually transmitted diseases in the USA according to a report.
  2. Enterococcus: An ESKAPE pathogen which resists vancomycin antibiotic.
  3. Staphylococcus Aureus: Multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) causes 64% more deaths than its non-resistant form.
  4. Klebsiella: A high level of Carbapenem-resistant bacteria.
  5. Acinetobacter: Commonly infects patients in intensive care unit (ICU) and other healthcare settings.
  6. Pseudomonas: Responsible for around 51,000 healthcare associated infections (HAIs) in the USA each year.
  7. E. coli: Now shows resistance to fluoroquinolones, common oral antimicrobial drugs for urinary tract infections (UTIs).
  8. Mycobacterium Tuberculosis (TB): India reported total resistance to all TB drugs. 480,000 MDR-TB (multidrug resistant) cases worldwide and XDR-TB (extensively-drug resistant) cases in 100 nations in 2014.
  9. Influenza: Type A and B influenza cause 250,000 to 500,000 deaths and 3 to 5 million cases of serious illness each year.
  10. Typhoid Fever: Affects 21 million worldwide population and causes 222,000 deaths (mostly children) each year.

Your part to playing antibiotic stewardship to avoid antibiotic resistance

Did you know? Antibiotics are prescribed by 95% of doctors in clinics without being absolutely sure if they are really required. Does that blame only the clinicians? Or do you also shoulder some responsibility as an antibiotic consumer? Well, a surveys says antibiotics are misunderstood as effective viral infection treatment by 36% of Americans while another reveals the U.S. as 46% of worldwide antibiotic market.

Take no shortcuts to heal

Right from our ancestors to doctors, they all think “rest” is the best remedy to speed up the healing process or stay fit. But we never take the time to see ourselves out of sickness, which is actually the ideal way. Most of us rely on antibiotics to clear up faster. However, the deal is: pay now in time or later with chronic problems.

Be your own advocate at doctor’s office

1 in 10 doctors would definitely prescribe you an antibiotic. At least of 10% of physicians don’t think it’s a big deal to give antibiotics even if they’re not required. With such scary numbers to tell, you ought to be your own health advocate these days! Ask if your illness is really bacterial, tell them you don’t preferably demand antibiotics, and choose a hospital which practices antibiotic stewardship.

Advertising

Use antibacterial cleaning products at minimum

“For routine day in and day out use, at my house I use a nice soap that smells like flowers. That’s fine. You don’t need anything special,” said deputy director Dr. Michael Bell from CDC.

Don’t become obsessed with antibacterial products! Most regular soaps or alcohol-based sanitizers are natural antibiotics and suffice the need to keep you safe from bacteria.

Check the meat you shop at grocery stores

The bacteria on raw meat can be life-threatening. CDC reports approximately 48 million Americans food poisoned every year. Protect yourself and the community by choosing only “antibiotic-free” meats. Avoid cross-contamination of other foods when handling or cooking meat by washing your hands thoroughly during and after preparing food.

Stick to alternatives whenever possible

Sometimes, even chronic or acute infections can be dealt with natural remedies instead of antibiotics, provided you are observed by a skilled herbalist or integrative MD. Viral and bacterial infections also respond to diet change and natural supplements.

Get on Get Smart

It’s a great resource made available by CDC to avoid unnecessary doctor visits or premature consulting, and eventually taking unnecessary antibiotics.

Featured photo credit: Mkcassidy75 via flickr.com

More by this author

Top 10 Estrogen Rich Foods That You Need or To Keep An Eye on! gout natural remedies Gout: What Is It? & What are its Natural Remedies? 10 Houseplants for a fresher breath of air at home Is Antibiotic Abuse Murdering Our Future & Your Part to Playing Antibiotic Stewardship Natural Tricks for Cough Don’t Take Your Coughing Lightly! Natural Tricks for Cough

Trending in Health

1 7 Best Probiotic Supplements (Recommendation & Reviews) 2 Signs of a Nervous Breakdown (And How to Survive It) 3 How to Find Weight Loss Meal Plans That Work for You 4 14 Healthy Easy Recipes for People on the Go 5 How to Manage Anxiety: Sound Advice from a Mental Health Expert

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

Advertising

3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

Advertising

6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

Advertising

9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

Advertising

Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

Read Next