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What Will Happen When You No Longer Go To The “Top 10 Attractions”

What Will Happen When You No Longer Go To The “Top 10 Attractions”

1. You’ll do less cramming and planning, and do more relaxing and having fun.

Sure a full itinerary seems exciting before you reach your destination. Planning is half the fun right? But once you arrive at your destination, you’ll find yourself over-scheduled and overwhelmed. How can you possibly see everything and do everything in the time that you have? Short answer: you can’t. So let it go, and just focus on seeing the city or town you’re in. Spend your first day in any city simply by being there. Soak up that feeling of being somewhere new, being away from work, your city, and being carefree. Eat different stuff. Talk to strangers. Stop and really see things and their beauty.

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2. You’ll have time to search out some authentic local experiences rather than visiting places that have been so completely tourist-ized.

Staying away from the most major tourist attractions will also put you in places where more locals are (since they stay away from crowded spots with long lines when at all possible). For instance, staying at an agriturismo or monastery in a small town in Italy, often yields a far more unique and rewarding experience than staying at an expensive hotel in an area crowded with tourists. Moreover, by staying in places a bit off the beaten path, you’ll be able to visit places and take photos without as many people photo bombing all your candid shots.

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3. You’ll eat better and drink better.

The farther away you stray from the main sights, the better the quality and prices get. Forget plastic menus with photos and low quality food churned out by the bucket to appease un-discerning tourist palates. Head for the shrinking price-tags and dishes you can’t pronounce to get a real taste of the country or city you’re visiting. For example: When I was in Croatia, I befriended a local restaurant owner and asked his advice for great seafood spots (we were in Dubrovnik). He recommended I get away from Dubrovnik completely (overall lackluster restaurants with high price-tags), and visit the nearby small village of Ston (and it’s counterpart Mali-Ston). He had some friends who ran an unofficial ‘restaurant’ from their house. What followed was the best meal I had during my three week vacation in Croatia. Six courses of seafood pulled straight from the sea, a stunning view, no crowds, and a price tag that was a 1/3 of the price my friend and I would’ve paid for 1/2 as much at any restaurant in Dubrovnik. Plus we stumbled across an amazing crumbling 15th century wall and stairs, that led up over mountains on the way back to Dubrovnik. That’s a day we’ll never forget, and we’d never have known those places existed without throwing away our guidebooks and just chatting with the locals.

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4. To be able to truly say that you have ‘experienced’ a place, it is important to meet and talk with locals and discover things for yourself.

Rather than walk blindly from place to place following your guide book, walk the streets, grab coffee or drinks at random bars, and get lost. Discover things you weren’t looking for. Seeing the same things every person sees, and having no memories other than racing to and from top attractions, standing in lines, buying tickets, and then taking too many unnecessary photos, isn’t the best way to create true and lasting memories. Dare to veer away from the crowds and figure things out on your own. Get lost in a pitcher of good wine on a sunny porch and find yourself leaving a place with only a photo or two of the landscape– only because you had such a good time you forgot, for once, to pose in front of everything. Live.

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Last Updated on June 13, 2019

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

Sleeping next to your partner can be a satisfying experience and is typically seen as the mark of a stable, healthy home life. However, many more people struggle to share a bed with their partner than typically let on. Sleeping beside someone can decrease your sleep quality which negatively affects your life. Maybe you are light sleepers and you wake each other up throughout the night. Maybe one has a loud snoring habit that’s keeping the other awake. Maybe one is always crawling into bed in the early hours of the morning while the other likes to go to bed at 10 p.m.

You don’t have to feel ashamed of finding it difficult to sleep with your partner and you also don’t have to give up entirely on it. Common problems can be addressed with simple solutions such as an additional pillow. Here are five fixes for common sleep issues that couples deal with.

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1. Use a bigger mattress to sleep through movement

It can be difficult to sleep through your partner’s tossing and turning all night, particularly if they have to get in and out of bed. Waking up multiple times in one night can leave you frustrated and exhausted. The solution may be a switch to a bigger mattress or a mattress that minimizes movement.

Look for a mattress that allows enough space so that your partner can move around without impacting you or consider a mattress made for two sleepers like the Sleep Number bed.[1] This bed allows each person to choose their own firmness level. It also minimizes any disturbances their partner might feel. A foam mattress like the kind featured in advertisements where someone jumps on a bed with an unspilled glass of wine will help minimize the impact of your partner’s movements.[2]

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2. Communicate about scheduling conflicts

If one of you is a night owl and the other an early riser, bedtime can become a source of conflict. It’s hard for a light sleeper to be jostled by their partner coming to bed four hours after them. Talk to your partner about negotiating some compromises. If you’re finding it difficult to agree on a bedtime, negotiate with your partner. Don’t come to bed before or after a certain time, giving the early bird a chance to fully fall asleep before the other comes in. Consider giving the night owl an eye mask to allow them to stay in bed while their partner gets up to start the day.

3. Don’t bring your technology to bed

If one partner likes bringing devices to bed and the other partner doesn’t, there’s very little compromise to be found. Science is pretty unanimous on the fact that screens can cause harm to a healthy sleeper. Both partners should agree on a time to keep technology out of the bedroom or turn screens off. This will prevent both partners from having their sleep interrupted and can help you power down after a long day.

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4. White noise and changing positions can silence snoring

A snoring partner can be one of the most difficult things to sleep through. Snoring tends to be position-specific so many doctors recommend switching positions to stop the snoring. Rather than sleeping on your back doctors recommend turning onto your side. Changing positions can cut down on noise and breathing difficulties for any snorer. Using a white noise fan, or sound machine can also help soften the impact of loud snoring and keep both partners undisturbed.

5. Use two blankets if one’s a blanket hog

If you’ve got a blanket hog in your bed don’t fight it, get another blanket. This solution fixes any issues between two partners and their comforter. There’s no rule that you have to sleep under the same blanket. Separate covers can also cut down on tossing and turning making it a multi-useful adaptation.

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Rather than giving up entirely on sharing a bed with your partner, try one of these techniques to improve your sleeping habits. Sleeping in separate beds can be a normal part of a healthy home life, but compromise can go a long way toward creating harmony in a shared bed.

Featured photo credit: Becca Tapert via unsplash.com

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