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10 Awesome Job Perks That Attract Millennials

10 Awesome Job Perks That Attract Millennials

Millennials are either avoided or highly sought out by employers. They’ve earned negative stereotypes such as lazy, apathetic, and social- media obsessed, which sometimes prevent employers from hiring them. However, despite this, many companies need the skills of Millennials. Known for their highly creative, innovative ideas, and mastery in technology, Millennials will occupy the largest workforce demographic and shape the corporate world in the years to come.

One thing that makes Millennials stand out among other generations is their work styles. For one, Millennials doesn’t seem to be motivated by the same things that motivated the generations before them. That’s why luring them and making them stay in your company can be more hard work than you’ve previously thought.

Understanding Millennials is the first step in attracting them into your workplace. You have to know what motivates them in their careers. You have to tap into their mindsets to understand their wants and needs. “Millennials view the workplace through the same lens of new technology as any other aspect of their lives: instant, open, and limitless” said Adam Miller, president and CEO of Cornerstone on Demand. So what can companies do to attract and retain top millennial talents? Here are 10 awesome job perks that might give you some ideas.

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1. Travel Perks

Forget about buying fancy homes and cars. According to a study led by Harris Group – 72% of Millennials prefer spending money on travel and social events. Companies who offer travel perks will attract many Millennials during their hiring season. Allowing your employees to travel for vacation will make them love working in your company. They will also feel less stressed after their relaxing out of town tour.

Airbnb is one example of company who has an envious travel perk for its employees. The company offers a travel credit program that encourages employees to travel four times a year. The system works by giving each employees travel credit at the beginning of each quarter which expires if they don’t use it.

2. Flexible Work Hours

Millennials value personal time. According to a recent study on The Cost of Millennial Retention, 45% of Millennials chose flexibility over higher pay. They’re not so much of a fan of 9-5 work hours and like to be out of the office after the end of the shift. They’re also fan of work from home options which allows them to juggle personal and work schedules efficiently.

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3. Free Food

You don’t have to share the world your sad desk lunches anymore.  Many companies from startups and small business to big giants like Google, Pixar and Drop box are offering free catered food for their employees. Other companies also found that free food during meetings and Fridays encouraged more employee productivity and attendance.

4. Trainings and Team Building Courses

Millennials are proud to describe themselves as life-long learners. Companies that offer trainings and team building courses earn a lot of good points for this generation. Team building activities are wonderful ways to relieve stress and keep work relationships strong and positive.

5. Game Rooms

Who doesn’t love game time?! Games are the best stress relievers. It’s a good way to have fun and bring people close together. From video games to classic games like Ping-Pong, foosball and darts, game rooms will surely excite your otherwise boring office environment. It will improve company culture, and even retain your best millennial employees.

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6. Pet Insurance

Pets in the office are the new cool. And one in every three fortune 500 companies now offers Veterinary Pet Insurance (VPI). These companies believe that bringing pets in the workplace can actually increase workplace morale and decrease stress and work fatigue. What a great treat for many millennial animal lovers!

7. Gym Membership, Spa, or Yoga

A healthy employee is a happy employee – and happy employees get the job done. Millennials are one of the most health-conscious generations. If you want to keep them in your company, wellness programs are going to make them stick around.

8. Offsite Charity Events

Grow your company and give back something good to the world. Millennials believe companies should contribute towards a good cause; it should be able to give them jobs which create exciting new experiences and make life more meaningful. It could be as simple as serving lunch at a food bank or cleaning up local beaches. If your company hosts offsite charity events from time to time, you’ll likely attract a lot of Millennials.

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9. Freebies

Free Netflix subscription, magazine, gadgets, or whatever the company is selling are small but effective incentives to earn employee loyalty and attract new hires, especially Millennials. Millennials are the best budget savvy people who will do anything to get something for less – or free!

10. Commute Allowance

Commuting to work can be stressful and gas and metro passes can be expensive.  Show your employees you care by giving them their monthly commute allowance. This will not only be a form of a kind gesture but also help keep your best and brightest Millennial around for longer.

Featured photo credit: Steven Lewis via unsplash.com

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Last Updated on March 30, 2020

How to Mind Map to Visualize Your Thoughts (With Mind Map Examples)

How to Mind Map to Visualize Your Thoughts (With Mind Map Examples)

Traditionally, when you have a lot of ideas in your mind, you would create a text document, or take a sheet of paper and start writing in a linear fashion like this:

  • Intro to Visual Facilitation
    • Problem, Consequences, Solution, Benefits, Examples, Call to action
  • Structure
    • Why, What, How to, What If
  • Do It Myself?
    • Audio, Images, time-consuming, less expensive
  • Specialize Offering?
    • Built to Sell (Standard Product Offering), Options (Solving problems, Online calls, Dev projects)

This type of document quickly becomes overwhelming. It obviously lacks in clarity. It also makes it hard for you to get a full picture at a glance and see what is missing.

You always have too much information to look at, and most often you only get a partial view of the information. It’s hard to zoom out, figuratively, and to see the whole hierarchy and how everything is connected.

To see a fuller picture, create a mind map.

What Is a Mind Map?

A mind map is a simple hierarchical radial diagram. In other words, you organize your thoughts around a central idea. This technique is especially useful whenever you need to “dump your brain”, or develop an idea, a project (for example, a new product or service), a problem, a solution, etc. By capturing what you have in your head, you make space for other thoughts.

In this article, we are focusing on the basics: mind mapping using pen and paper.

The objective of a mind map is to clearly visualize all your thoughts and ideas before your eyes. Don’t complicate a mind map with too many colors or distractions. Use different colors only when they serve a purpose. Always keep a mind map simple and easy to follow.

    Image Credit: English Central

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    By following the three next steps below, you will be able to create such mind maps easily and quickly.

    3 Simple Steps to Create a Mind Map

    The three steps are:

    1. Set a central topic
    2. Add branches of related ideas
    3. Add sub-branches for more relevant ideas

    Let’s take a look at an example Verbal To Visual illustrates on the benefits of mind mapping.[1]

    Step 1 : Set a Central Topic

    Take a blank sheet of paper, write down the topic you’ve been thinking about: a problem, a decision to make, an idea to develop, or a project to clarify.

    Word it in a clear and concise manner.

      What is the first idea that comes to mind when you think of the subject for your mind map? Draw a line (straight or curved) from the central topic, and write down that idea.

        Step 3 : Add Sub-Branches for More Relevant Ideas

        Then, what does that idea make you think of? What is related to it? List it out next to it in the same way, using your pen.

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          You can always add more to it later, but that’s good for now.

          In our example, we could detail the sub-branch “Benefits” by listing those benefits in sub-branches of the branch “Benefits”. Unfortunately, we already reached the side of the sheet, so we’re out of space to do so. You could always draw a line to a white space on the page and list them there, but it’s awkward.

          Since we created this mind map on a regular letter-format sheet of paper, the quantity of information that fits in there is very limited. That is one of the main reasons why I recommend that you use software rather than pen and paper for most of the mind mapping that you do.

          Repeat Step 2 and Step 3

          Repeat steps 2 and 3 as many times as you need to flush out all of your ideas around the topic that you chose.

            I added first-level (main) branches around the central topic mostly in a clockwise fashion, from top-right to top-left. That is how, by convention, a mind map is read.

            In the next section, we are covering the three strategies to building your maps.  

            Mind Map Examples to Illustrate Mind Mapping

            You can go about creating a mind map in various ways:

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            • Branch by Branch: Adding whole branches (with all of their sub-branches), one by one.
            • Level by Level: Adding elements to the map, one level at a time. That means that firstly, you add elements around the central topic (main branches). Then, you add sub-branches to those main branches. And so on.
            • Free-Flow: Adding elements to your mind map as they come to you, in no particular order.

            Branch by Branch

            Start with the central topic, add a first branch. Focus on that branch and detail it as much as you can by adding all the sub-branches that you can think of.

              Then develop ideas branch by branch.

                A branch after another, and the mind map is complete.

                  Level by Level

                  In this “Level by Level” strategy, you first add all the elements that you can think of around the central topic, one level deep only. So here you add elements on level 1:

                    Then, go over each branch and add the immediate sub-branches (one level only). This is level 2:

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                      Idem for the next level. This is level 3. You can have as many levels as you want in a mind map. In our example, we only have 3 levels. Now the map is complete:

                        Free-Flow

                        Basically, a free flow strategy of mind mapping is to add main branches and sub-topics freely. No rules to restrict how ideas should flow in the mind map. The only thing to pay attention to is that you need to be careful about the level of the ideas you’re adding to the mind map — is it a main topic, or is it a subtopic?

                          I recommend using a combination of the “Branch by Branch” and the “Free-Flow” strategies.

                          What I normally do is I add one branch at a time, and later on review the mind map and add elements in various places to finish it. I also sometimes build level 1 (the main branches) first, then use a “Branch by Branch” approach, and later finish the map in a “Free-Flow” manner.

                          Try each strategy and combinations of strategies, and see what works best for you.

                          The Bottom Line

                          When you’re feeling stuck or when you’re just starting to think about a particular idea or project, take out a paper and start to brain dump your ideas and create a mind map. Mind mapping has the magic to clear your head and have your thoughts organized.

                          If you can’t always have access to a paper and pen, don’t worry! Creating a mind map with software is very effective and you get none of the drawbacks of pen and paper. You can also apply the above steps and strategies just the same when using a mind mapping tool on the phone and computer.

                          More Tools to Help You Organize Thoughts

                          Featured photo credit: Alvaro Reyes via unsplash.com

                          Reference

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