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This Man Eats Pizza And Loses Over 100 Pounds In 7 Months

This Man Eats Pizza And Loses Over 100 Pounds In 7 Months

Let’s be clear – New York City chef Pasquale Cozzolino did lose nearly 100 pounds, and he ate a lot of pizza in order to do so, but he did not attempt to subsist on it. He did not put himself on an oxymoronic pizza starvation diet. Cozzolino was smarter about his weight loss.

Read on to See How Cozzolino’s Pizza Story can Inspire You!

It all started after he’d moved to the United States in 2011 from Naples, Italy to work at a high-end Italian restaurant. Overcome by the worries of such a major life change, Cozzolino began stress-eating lots of cookies and soda. Between his arrival in NYC and early 2012, his weight had increased from about 250 to 370 pounds.

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    Credit: ABC News

    At this point, Cozzolino knew he had to make a change. He felt terrible physically, and his family barely recognized him when he visited. He took matters into his own hands.

    Many of us have had similar experiences of weight-gain. Sometimes we gain weight during phases of major change, other times the extra pounds just appear, seemingly with no known cause. It can be tempting to anxiously throw oneself (and a lot of money) into the newest extreme diet.

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    Fortunately for Cozzolino, common sense won over any panic-driven impulse to yo-yo diet. He researched his BMI and calculated the number of calories he’d need to consume to create a sufficient deficit for weight loss.

    Cozzolino’s Pizza Diet is Not Hocus-Pocus, but Sensible Eating

    Cozzolino began eating the so-called Mediterranean diet rather intuitively. He cut out desserts and sugary beverages, and added in fruits and veggies. He practiced portion control. He started exercising regularly. Breakfast was often whole-grain cereal and fruit. Dinners typically featured seafood and vegetables, and included a glass of wine. And… he ate a pizza every day!

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    Note, that’s pizza margherita, a Neopolitan-style pizza pie made with homemade tomato sauce and topped sparsely with mozzarella cheese and fresh basil. The pizza dough Cozzolino makes has few ingredients compared to typical American-style recipes. He combines just water, finely milled wheat flour, yeast, and sea salt, then lets the dough ferment for 36 hours. During fermentation the yeast eats up most of the natural sugars, a process which produces a more satisfying, complex carbohydrate dough.

      Credit: ABC News

      He asserts that his daily intake of homemade pizza works as a weight-loss practice because it’s nutritional and satisfying. Daily pizza consumption, Cozzolino-style, he argues, staves off cravings for sugar-dense binge foods. As he explains in a New York Post article, it “helps you to stay away from junk food. When you eat a pizza, you don’t need anything else.”

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        Credit: ABC News

        Pizza enthusiast and Lucky Peach writer Chad Roberston concurs. In his article “Pizza Gut,” Robertson explains how the fermentation process actually “reduces the work our digestive systems have to do.” You may have heard arguments against the protein gluten found in wheat and other grains. In short, gluten can increase inflammation in the intestines, which can cascade into a number of other issues like nutrient deficiencies.

        The Secret’s in the Dough

        But Cozzolino has not stated a case against gluten. Rather, as Robertson explains, pizza dough like Cozzolino makes is both satisfying and nutritious because during the fermentation gluten (in addition to sugars) is broken-down. Fermented foods give us healthy gut bacteria, and people with healthy gut bacteria have an easier time losing weight than those without.

          Credit: ABC News

          Unlike a lot of good cooks, professional or amateur, Cozzolino is not stingy with his famous recipes. Watch this ABC News video The Pizza Diet to see the pizzaiolo’s transformation, and check out the Eater NY tutorial to learn how to make his dough at home. If you he wins you over, you may want to sign up for an in-person pizza making class at his restaurant, Ribalta, in NYC and abroad.

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          Last Updated on March 13, 2019

          How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

          How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

          Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

          You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

          Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

          1. Work on the small tasks.

          When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

          Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

          2. Take a break from your work desk.

          Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

          Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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          3. Upgrade yourself

          Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

          The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

          4. Talk to a friend.

          Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

          Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

          5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

          If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

          Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

          Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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          6. Paint a vision to work towards.

          If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

          Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

          Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

          7. Read a book (or blog).

          The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

          Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

          Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

          8. Have a quick nap.

          If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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          9. Remember why you are doing this.

          Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

          What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

          10. Find some competition.

          Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

          Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

          11. Go exercise.

          Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

          Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

          As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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          Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

          12. Take a good break.

          Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

          Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

          Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

          Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

          More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

          Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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