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4 Ways You Can Enjoy Being A Restaurateur

4 Ways You Can Enjoy Being A Restaurateur

If you’re a person who has read the book Eat, Pray, Love, you will understand the section eat resonates to many who owns a restaurant. In our world these days, food has become a fashion accessory you wear. It’s beauty taken in beautiful angles for Instagram and SnapChat, showing the world how amazing life can be. We adorn our food based on its unthinkable ideas; toilet bowl restaurants, de-constructed coffee and an extreme collection of vegan diets.

However, this would be a perspective of a customer, my question is: How would you react if you’re the brains behind the whole success?

As a restaurateur, you eventually lose your love for cooking and most times fall prey to the overnight fame and stress. After weeks of exploring Bosnia and it’s food culture, I’ve managed to put together a collection of advice that might help you enjoy owning a restaurant and making food for the rest of your life.

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1. Food Should Always Be The Priority Over Money

In our world these days, money has always seemed to take the highest priority, therefore, it’s no surprise that a restaurant business revolves around money and popularity. There are many chefs that started off making food due to passion however eventually became the slave of profit.

According to Gordon Ramsay whom in my point of view is the Father Of Food, never failed to stress the importance of focusing on the quality and the taste of the food instead of the income. He firmly believes that for a restaurant to be successful, the love and passion should be portrayed through the food and not the check.

It’s a lesson many restaurateurs forget over time. Therefore if you’re finding it hard to rekindle your cooking spirit, go back to the first kitchen you started and reminisce on why and how you fell in love with making food. You’ll be able to find the kitchen diva in you yet again.

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2. Creativity Is Never The Final Destination

Often enough I hear from the new age hipsters that the best way to make food is being creative; however my trip to ancient Bosnia proved otherwise. Creativity is definitely a crucial aspect , especially in the current world we live in, however, remembering our past and trailing back in time could actually be the point of view many restaurants might need these days.

As the times moved on, we find an immense amount of gastronomic restaurants around us but we have slowly forgotten how food was created. We have slowly started leaving behind traditions and history of how food was made. This has led to the extinction of traditional cuisine.

As they say, creativity lies in the eyes of the beholder; find out your own roots and bring that back to your restaurant. I can guarantee you, it will give both your customers and you the satisfaction and joy needed in being part of the food industry.

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3. Prioritize Your Employees First

When you’re a boss, it’s easy to forget how to be humble; while many may disagree it’s psychologically proven that humans tend to indulge in power. Over the years many companies have practiced openness and trust as part of the companies growth. Therefore, both employees and bosses are bound by protocols which keep them equal and satisfied.

These have also become the practice of many restaurants as they realize the importance to hire great people and to keep great people as they progress. When your restaurant reaches a point of passive income, you would need employees who aren’t working for the benefits but working for the love and loyalty of the company. This attitude gives you the opportunity to expand and grow without the fear of being betrayed, hence increasing your restaurant’s profit, keeps your clients happy, and allows your employees to prosper.

If you’re a person who has trouble communicating, allow them to speak to you first and then give yourself time to speak to them. Always keep in mind that a great restaurant is in the hands of great employees.

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4. Always Make Sure To Have A Financial Planner

Over time a well-known restaurant or a growing restaurant will start gathering passive income. This becomes prominent when you start reaping huge profits and have the capacity of expansion. It’s an accomplishment and often times a break many restaurateurs would’ve spent their entire lifetime waiting for.

However , with greatness comes responsibility and the stress for financial organization. The best advice is to always have a financial adviser or auditor that you trust. Preferably avoid family and friends, this is because there’s always a fine line between business and relationships and often time working together with people you love could end up disastrously.

Therefore, hire someone who’s known for their organization, have great experiences and one you know that you can rely on. I suppose your instincts should be your best teacher regarding this matter.

Generally, being a restaurateur allows you the freedom to be creative and allows you to live the dream life if a certain balance is maintained. This tips will definitely be of great use for those who are growing and looking forward to being part of this industry.

Featured photo credit: Google Images. via thumbnail.ymlp.com

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Last Updated on January 15, 2019

What Are Interpersonal Skills? Master Them for Better Relationships

What Are Interpersonal Skills? Master Them for Better Relationships

When I wrote my book Extraordinary PR, Ordinary Budget: A Strategy Guide, I was surprised at the various layers of review and editing necessary to get the book to publication. Before I ever submitted the manuscript, I enlisted a former colleague to read and copy edit my work. Then, I submitted my work to an editor at the publisher’s house, and once she approved it, she sent it to her colleagues and then her company’s editorial board.

Upon editorial board approval of my book, my editor sent my work to reviewers in my field, then a developmental editor, then a designer and layout team and, finally, another copy editor. There were a host of personalities with whom I needed to interact along the way.

It turns out that getting a publishing contract was just the beginning – a lot happens between developing a concept, writing the book, finding an agent and publisher, and getting the book on bookshelves or on Audible or Kindle. Through every milestone of the publishing process, my ability to interact with others was crucial. This underscored for me that no matter what or how much a person accomplishes, you never do it alone – everyone needs assistance from others.

While I conceived of the book and wrote the manuscript, there is no way my book could have hit booksellers’ shelves without the dozens of people who were involved in the publishing process. Further, interpersonal skills can propel or stonewall success.

Even as someone who has written hundreds of essays, press releases, pitch notes and other correspondence, writing itself is not a solitary endeavor. Sure, I may write in solitude, but the moment I am finished writing, there are always clients, colleagues, partners, peers and others who review my content.

What is more, even as a published author and contributor for this platform, I try to never submit final copy (content) that has not been copy edited. I send everything to my copy editor, whom I pay out of my own pocket, for her review, edits and approval. Once she has reviewed my work, caught unbeknownst-to-me errors, I am much more confident putting my work out in the world.

How Interpersonal Skills Affect Relationships

It is clearer to me now more than ever before that interpersonal skills are needed in every profession and every trade.

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People don’t elect leaders because the leaders are smart. Individuals are motivated to vote when they have a hero and when they feel they have something to lose. If they seriously dislike the other candidate, they are much more likely vote according to a 2000 Ohio State University study:

“A disliked candidate is seen as a threat, and that will be motivation to go to the polls. But a threat alone isn’t enough – people need to have a hero to vote for, too, in order to inspire them to turn out on Election Day.”

In a work setting, interpersonal skills impact every facet of your development and success. Trainers must collaborate with a design team or the company hiring them to facilitate the training. During the training itself, the facilitators must connect with the audience and establish a rapport that supports vulnerability and openness. If the trainers interact poorly with the trainees, they are unlikely to be invited back. If they are invited back, they may be unlikely to inspire cooperation or growth in their trainees.

Solopreneurs interactions with clients and subcontractors, and those interactions will, in part, support or adversely impact their business. If you enjoy a career as an acclaimed surgeon or respected lawyer, your interactions with patients, clients, health insurance agencies and a team of other practitioners – many of whom are shielded from public view – will improve or decimate your practice.

As a hiring manager, one of the things I consider when interviewing candidates is their interpersonal skills. I assess the interpersonal skills they display in their content and face-to-face presentation. I ask probing questions to learn how they interact with others, manage conflict and contribute to a team atmosphere.

When candidates say things like, “I prefer to work alone” or “I can hit the ground running without assistance,” I bristle. When candidates appear to know everything and everyone, I wonder if they will be receptive to learning or open to feedback. Could these statements be indications that these individuals lack interpersonal skills?

It stands to reason, then, that interpersonal skills are among the most valuable and the bedrock of all talents and skills.

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What are Interpersonal Skills?

Interpersonal skills range from emotional intelligence, empathy, oral and written communication to leadership to collaboration and teamwork.

In sum, interpersonal skills are skills that enable you to interact well with others. They include teachability and receptiveness to feedback, active or mindful listening, self-confidence and conflict resolution.

From a communications standpoint, interpersonal skills are about understanding how colleagues prefer to communicate and then using the appropriate mediums to meet respective needs. It is about understanding how to communicate in a way to get the most out of different people.

For instance, in my career as a public relations practitioner, part of what I am constantly evaluating is which colleagues, clients and members of the media prefer email, text or phone calls. I am assessing how much frill to use with each person depending on what has worked in the past and depending on what I know about the person with whom I am interacting.

Making these decisions and being disciplined enough to follow each person’s known preferences helps me better connect with the various individuals in my orbit. Is this tiring at times? Yes. Is it necessary? Absolutely.

How to Improve Interpersonal Skills

There are tons of resources to teach interpersonal skills. I love books such as Leadership Presence by Belle Linda Halpern and Kathy Lubar, and The 5 Love Languages by Gary Chapman.

There are also a host of books and articles on emotional intelligence, which is the ability to manage one’s emotions and perceive and adapt to others’ emotions. Emotional intelligence is likewise a critical component of positive interpersonal relations. You can learn more about it in this article: What Is Emotional Intelligence and Why It Is Important

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Active and mindful listening also support improved interpersonal skills. I recommend you take a look at this piece: Active Listening – A Skill That Everyone Should Master

I have further found that humility helps a ton with interpersonal skills. It takes humility to admit you have more to learn and that you can learn from the people around you. In fact, everyone with whom you interact has a lesson to teach you. And employers are increasingly looking for team members who are lifelong learners, meaning they believe there is always room for growth and professional and personal development.

Forbes contributor Kevin H. Johnson noted in a July 2018 article,

“That’s why, when anyone asks what the next ‘hot’ skill will be, I say it’s the same skill that will serve people today, tomorrow, and far into the future—the ability to learn.”

Don’t overlook introspection.

While interpersonal skills may seem simple enough, introspection is critical to learning where and in what ways you need to grow.

Through introspection and observation, I have learned that my interpersonal skills suffer when I am sleep deprived, because then I am short-tempered and irritable. I’ve observed this connection over a significant period in my life. Unsurprisingly, it is also true of others. Fellow LifeHack contributor, health coach and personal trainer Jamie Logie noted:

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When you are chronically sleep deprived, it really does a number on you. A lack of sleep can keep your body in a constant state of stress and over time this can get pretty ugly. Elevated stress hormones can be involved in creating a bunch of pretty nasty conditions including anxiety, headaches and dizziness, weight gain, depression, stroke, hypertension, digestive disorders, immune system dysfunction, irritability.

Additionally, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development reported,

“Sleep deprivation can noticeably affect people’s performance, including their ability to think clearly, react quickly, and form memories. Sleep deprivation also affects mood, leading to irritability; problems with relationships, especially for children and teenagers; and depression. Sleep deprivation can also increase anxiety.”

The point is, even as you are identifying ways to improve interpersonal skills, think about what is getting in the way. While sleep deprivation is a trigger for me, your stumbling block may be different.

The Bottom Line

You cannot fix what you do not know is broken. Even as you work to understand and apply interpersonal skills, spend some time in mindful meditation to get clear on what is holding you back from developing solid relationships.

Featured photo credit: Austin Distel via unsplash.com

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