Advertising
Advertising

We Are All the Same: Popular Stars Who Were Bullied at School

We Are All the Same: Popular Stars Who Were Bullied at School

Many of us tend to think that celebrities are superhumans. Sure thing! Fortunate enough to be born under a lucky star, they don’t know what the bitterness of life is. In fact, it is far from true. Stars are also people, so nothing human is strange to them. There are many complicated life stories hidden behind a snow-white smile. Some celebrities faced a problem of bullying at school just like you or your kids — and just like many people all over the world. Do you want to hear their stories? If so, get ready to discover some new facts about your favorite stars you had no idea about.

1. Christian Bale

Christian Bale

    Christian Bale got interested in theater at a fairly young age. When he was nine, he was featured in a commercial for the first time. His classmates didn’t like his hobby. They bullied him and beat him up. However, the talented teen didn’t give up. And what happened later? Bingo! He showed up on a TV screen as Batman! This is probably one of the most desired male roles. Today, Bale is a world-famous actor who has received numerous awards including an Oscar and a Golden Globe.

    2. Jessica Alba

    Jessica Alba

      Believe it or not, but a stunning beauty Jessica Alba suffered from bullying at high school. She was victimized for her Texas accent and buck teeth. Also, she was quite an awkward teenager. As a result, her peers taunted her. Alba managed to overcome her clumsiness and become a model. Now she is a successful actress and entrepreneur. And this grown-up girl with buck teeth was ranked number six on “The Most Beautiful Women in the World.”

      Advertising

      3. Winona Ryder

      Winona Ryder

        Secondary school was the absolute hell for Winona Ryder. She was beaten up by a group of bullies. They shouted some anti-gay words at her and called her a boy. She had a short haircut in those years because of her obsession with the movie “Bugsy Malone.” As the actress recalls, she dropped out of school after one of the beatings. One day, her old bully asked her for an autograph at a cafe. She swore loudly at him. The strength of mind helped Ryder recover from bullying and build a successful career in film industry.

        4. Taylor Swift

        Taylor Swift

          No pain; no gain. Taylor Swift is the living proof of the old wisdom. The singer admitted that high school bullies inspired her to start writing songs. And you know what? These days, people all around the world admire her talent. Swift is a top 10 most followed people on Instagram.

          5. Steven Spielberg

          Advertising

          Steven Spielberg

            At school, Steven Spielberg was victimized for being a nerd. He stayed away from noisy parties and devoted himself to studies. His peers bullied him for this.

            Life has shown that Spielberg did everything right. His runaway success in movie-making owes a lot to his diligence at school. He is known as a distinguished film producer, movie director, and business person of our age. The sheer fact that Spielberg was ranked second on The Great Living Directors speaks for itself.

            6. Madonna

            Madonna

              You could hardly find a person who hasn’t heard of Madonna. She is a very recognizable person on the modern music stage. But in hindsight, she wasn’t always that well-liked. The Queen of pop music had a tough life at school. She said that boys called her “a hairy monster” and bullied her because of that. So what did she do? She ceased to shave her armpits. This is so typical of Madonna, isn’t it? She is well-known for her rebellious nature. And she has been ranked 43 on The Best Singers of All Time the years after.

              7. Lady Gaga

              Advertising

              Lady Gaga

                Without a doubt, Lady Gaga has got her style. She began to wear extravagant clothes since school. No wonder her classmates called her a freak and made fun of her. It made her life unbearable. However, the singer managed to pull herself together. She stopped paying attention to all the gossip behind her back. These days, Lady Gaga has dedicated fans all over the globe. She calls them “little monsters” and encourages them to be who they are no matter what. Fortune favors the bold. 

                8. Kate Winslet

                Kate Winslet

                  Some teens get bullied at school because of their weight. Kate Winslet was one of them. She has never been a slender child. Her classmates teased her and called “blubber.” Such offensive nicknames made her feel horrible. But she didn’t give up on her dream to become an actress. Over the years, the ugly duckling turned into a beautiful swan. Currently, we know Winslet as one of the most beautiful women in the world. She also won an Oscar for one of her roles.

                  9. Daniel Radcliffe

                  DANIEL RADCLIFFE

                    During his adolescence, the Harry Potter star wasn’t a popular teen. His class fellows considered him “uncool” and poked fun at him. On one occasion, 14-year-old Radcliffe even put up a fight with his 19-year-old bully. In fairness, it must be said that such battles look spectacular only in the movies. It was a negative experience for both guys since they punched each other for real. Now Radcliffe is the one having the last laugh. At his young age, he is a famous actor and a role model for many teenagers across the globe.

                    Advertising

                    If you are being bullied now, keep in mind that school is just a phase of your life. It won’t last forever. Everything will get better. The next time you feel oppressed, recall those celebrities from the list who experienced bullying as well. If they managed to get through it and pick themselves up, you can do it, too. Your time to shine will come! Make no doubt about it!

                    Featured photo credit: ladybird2810 via Flickr.com, JD Laslca via Flickr.com, Tom Sorensen via Flickr.com, Josh Hutcherson via Flickr.com, Ricky Brlgante via Flickr.com, Ricardo Sanz Cortlella via Flickr.com, JC Motors via Flickr.com, Chescasantos101 via Flickr.com, Reshma Pradeep via Flickr.com

                    Featured photo credit: Rishabh Atrey/Flickr.com via flickr.com

                    More by this author

                    10 Must-Have Apps for Your Teen’s Smartphone 7 Helpful Apps For Parents of Special Needs Kids 10 Apps and Tools to Be More Productive at Work 8 Ideas for Your Teen’s Christmas Present Parenting apps Apps The Modern Parent Can’t Survive Without

                    Trending in Lifestyle

                    1 What Is Clean Eating (Essential Tips + Clean Eating Meal Plan) 2 Why You’re Feeling Tired All the Time (and What to Do About It) 3 5 Reasons Why Being a Perfectionist May Not Be So Perfect 4 9 Powerful Questions That Can Improve Your Quality of Life 5 10 Real Reasons Why Breaking Bad Habits Is So Difficult

                    Read Next

                    Advertising
                    Advertising
                    Advertising

                    Last Updated on November 12, 2020

                    Why You’re Feeling Tired All the Time (and What to Do About It)

                    Why You’re Feeling Tired All the Time (and What to Do About It)

                    If you find that you’re feeling tired all the time, it’s important to understand that it’s a common problem for many. With all of the demands of daily life, being tired seems to be the new baseline. In fact, two-fifths of Americans are tired most of the week.[1]

                    If you’re tired of feeling exhausted, then I’ve got some great news for you. New research is helping us gain critical insights into the underlying causes of feeling tired all the time.

                    In this article, we’ll discuss the latest reasons why you’re so tired and practical steps you can take to finally get to the bottom of your fatigue and feel rested.

                    What Happens When You’re Too Tired

                    If you sleep just two hours less than the normal eight hours, you could be as impaired as someone who has consumed up to three beers.[2] And you’ve probably experienced the impact yourself.

                    Here are some common examples of what happens when you’re feeling tired:[3]

                    • Trouble focusing because memory and learning functions may be impaired.
                    • Experience mood swings and an inability to differentiate between what’s important and what’s not.
                    • Dark circles under your eyes and/or your skin make look dull and lackluster in the short term and over time your skin may get wrinkles and show signs of aging because your body didn’t have time to remove toxins during sleep.
                    • Finding it more difficult to exercise.
                    • Immune system may weaken, causing you to pick up infections more easily.
                    • Overeating because not getting enough sleep activates the body’s endocannabinoids, even when you’re not hungry.
                    • Metabolism slows down, so what you eat is more likely to be stored as belly fat.

                    Why Are You Feeling Tired All the Time?

                    Leading experts are starting to recognize that there are three primary reasons people feel tired on a regular basis: sleep deprivation, fatigue, and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS).

                    Here’s a quick overview of each common cause of fatigue and feeling tired all of the time:

                    1. Tiredness occurs from sleep deprivation when you don’t get high-quality sleep consistently. It typically can be solved by changing your routine and getting enough deep, restorative sleep.
                    2. Fatigue occurs from prolonged sleeplessness, which could be triggered by numerous health problems, such as mental health issues, long-term illness, fibromyalgia, obesity, sleep apnea, or stress. It typically can be improved by changing your lifestyle and using sleep aids or treatments, if recommended by your physician.
                    3. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is a medical condition also known as Myalgic Encephalomyelitis that occurs from persistent exhaustion that doesn’t go away with sleep.

                    The exact cause of CFS is not known, but it may be due to problems with the immune system, a bacterial infection, a hormone imbalance, or emotional trauma. It typically involves working with a doctor to rule out other illnesses before diagnosing and treating CFS.[4]

                    Always consult a physician to get a personal diagnosis about why you are feeling tired, especially if it is a severe condition.

                    You can learn more about some causes of fatigue in this video:

                    Feeling Tired Vs Being Fatigued

                    If lack of quality sleep doesn’t seem to be the root cause for you, then it’s time to explore fatigue as the reason you are frequently feeling tired.

                    Until recently, tiredness and fatigue were thought to be interchangeable. Leading experts now realize that tiredness and fatigue are different.

                    Advertising

                    Tiredness is primarily about lack of sleep. However, fatigue is a perceived feeling of being tired that is much more likely to occur in people who have depression, anxiety, or emotional stress and/or are overweight and physically inactive[5].

                    Symptoms of fatigue include:

                    • Difficulty concentrating
                    • Low stamina
                    • Difficulty sleeping
                    • Anxiety
                    • Low motivation

                    These symptoms may sound similar to those of tiredness, but they usually last longer and are more intense.

                    Unfortunately, there is no definitive reason why fatigue occurs because it can be a symptom of an emotional or physical illness. However, there are still a number of steps you can take to reduce difficult symptoms by making a few simple lifestyle changes.

                    How Much Sleep Is Enough?

                    The number one reason you may feel tired is because of sleep deprivation, which means you are not getting enough high-quality sleep.

                    Research suggests that most adults need 7 to 9 hours of high-quality, uninterrupted sleep per night[6]. If you’re sleep deprived, the amount of sleep you need increases.

                    Get the right amount of sleep to stop feeling tired.

                      The key to quality sleep is being able to get long, uninterrupted sleep cycles throughout the night. It typically takes 90 minutes for you to reach a state of deep REM sleep where your body’s healing crew goes to work.

                      Ideally, you want to get at least 3 to 4 deep REM sleep cycles in per night. That’s why it’s so important to stay asleep for 7 or more hours.

                      Research also shows that people who think they can get by on less sleep don’t perform as well as people who get at least seven hours of sleep a night[7]

                      If you are not getting 7 hours of high-quality sleep regularly, then sleep deprivation is the most likely reason you feel tired all the time. That is actually good news because sleep deprivation is much simpler and easier to address than the other root causes.

                      It’s also a good idea to rule out sleep deprivation as the reason why you are tired before moving on to the other possibilities, such as fatigue or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, which may require a doctor for diagnosis and treatment.

                      Advertising

                      4 Simple Changes to Reduce Fatigue

                      Personally, I’m a big believer in upgrading your lifestyle to uplift your life. I overcame chronic stress and exhaustion by making these four changes to my lifestyle:

                      1. Eating healthy, home-cooked meals versus microwaving processed foods or eating out
                      2. Exercising regularly
                      3. Using stressbusters
                      4. Creating a bedtime routine to sleep better

                      After I made the 4 simple changes in my lifestyle, I no longer felt exhausted all of the time.

                      I was so excited that I wanted to help others replace stress and exhaustion with rest and well-being, too. That’s why I became a Certified Holistic Wellness Coach through the Dr. Sears Wellness Institute.

                      Interestingly enough, I discovered that Dr. Sears recommends a somewhat similar L.E.A.N. lifestyle:

                      • L is for Lifestyle and means living healthy, including getting enough sleep.
                      • E is for Exercise and means getting at least 20 minutes of physical activity a day, ideally for six days a week.
                      • A is for Attitude and means thinking positive and reducing stress whenever possible.
                      • N is for Nutrition and means emphasizing a right-fat diet, not a low-fat diet.

                      The L.E.A.N. lifestyle is a scientifically-proven way to reduce fatigue, get to the optimal weight, and to achieve overall wellness.[8]

                      Living Healthy

                      Getting enough high-quality sleep every day is the surefire way to help you feel less fatigued, more rested, and better overall.

                      In fact, if you aren’t getting enough sleep, your body isn’t getting the time it needs to repair itself; meaning that if you are suffering from an illness, it’s far more likely to linger. In fact, long-term sleep deprivation has been linked to an increase in Alzheimer’s later in life[9].

                      As unlikely as it sounds, though, fatigue can sometimes make it difficult to sleep. That’s why I’d recommend taking a look at your bedtime routine before you go to bed and optimize it based on sleep best practices.

                      Here are 3 quick and easy tips for creating a pro-sleep bedtime routine:

                      1. Unplug

                      Many of us try to unwind by watching TV or doing something on an iPhone or tablet. However, tech can affect your melatonin production due to the blue light that they emit, fooling your body into thinking it’s still daytime. This won’t help you stop feeling tired all the time.

                      Try to turn off all tech one hour before bed and create a tech-free zone in your bedroom.

                      2. Unwind

                      Use the time before bed to do something you find relaxing such as reading a book, listening to soothing music, meditating, or taking an Epsom salt bath.

                      Advertising

                      3. Get Comfortable

                      Ensure your bed is comfortable and your room is set up for sleep.

                      Make sure you room is cool. 60-68 degrees is the ideal temperature for most people to sleep. Also, it’s ideal if your bedroom is dark and there is no noise.

                      Finally, make sure everything is handled (e.g., laying out tomorrow’s clothes) before you get into your nice, comfy bed. If your mind is still active, write a to-do list to help you fall asleep faster.[10]

                      This article also offers practical tips to build a bedtime routine: How to Build a Good Bedtime Routine That Makes Your Morning Easier

                      Exercise

                      Many people know that exercise is good for them, but they just can’t figure out how to fit it into their busy schedules.

                      That’s what happened in my case, but when my chronic stress and exhaustion turned into systemic inflammation (which can lead to major diseases like Alzheimer’s), I realized it was time to change my sedentary lifestyle.

                      I decided to start swimming because it was something I had always loved to do. Find an exercise you love and stick to it to stop feeling tired all the time. Ideally, get a combination of endurance training, strength training, and flexibility training during your daily 20-minute workout.

                      If you haven’t exercised in a while and have a lot of stress in your life, you may want to give yoga a try as it will increase your flexibility and lower your stress.

                      Attitude

                      Stress may be a major reason why you aren’t feeling well all of the time. At least that was the case with me.

                      When I worked 70 hours per week as a High-Tech Executive, I felt chronically stressed and exhausted, but there was one thing that always worked to help me feel calmer and less fatigued: Breathing.

                      But not just any old breathing. It was a special form of deep Yogic breathing called the “Long-Exhale Breathing” or “4-7-8 breathing” (or “Pranayama” in Sanskrit).

                      Here’s how you do Long-Exhale Breathing:

                      Advertising

                      1. Sit in a comfortable position with your spine straight and your hand on your tummy.
                      2. Breathe in deeply and slowly from your diaphragm with your mouth closed while you count to 4 (ideally until your stomach feels full of air).
                      3. Hold your breath while you mentally count to 7 and enjoy the stillness.
                      4. Breathe out through your mouth with a “ha” sound while you count to 8 (or until your stomach has no more air in it).
                      5. Pause after you finish your exhale while you notice the sense of wholeness and relaxation from completing one conscious, deep breath.
                      6. Repeat 3 times, ensuring your exhale is longer than your inhale so you relax your nervous system.

                      This type of “long-exhale breathing” is scientifically proven to reduce stress.

                      When your exhale is twice as long as your inhale, it soothes your parasympathetic nervous system, which regulates the relaxation response.[11]

                      Nutrition

                      Diet is vital for beating fatigue if you’re feeling tired all the time – after all, food is your main source of energy.

                      If your diet is poor, then it implies you’re not getting the nutrients you need to sustain healthy energy levels, which may lead to daytime sleepiness.

                      Eating a diet for fatigue doesn’t need to be complicated or time-consuming though. For most people, it’s just a case of swapping a few unhealthy foods for a few healthier ones, like switching from low-fiber, processed foods to whole, high-fiber foods.

                      Here’re 9 simple diet swaps you can make today:

                      1. Replace your morning coffee with Matcha green tea and drink only herbal tea within six hours of bedtime.
                      2. Add a healthy fat or protein to any carb you eat, especially if you eat before bed.
                      3. Fill up with fiber, especially green leafy vegetables.
                      4. Replace refined, processed, low-fiber pastas and grains with zucchini noodles and whole grains such as buckwheat, quinoa, sorghum, oats, amaranth, millet, teff, brown rice, and corn.
                      5. Swap natural sweeteners for refined sugars, and try to ensure you don’t get more than 25g of sugar a day if you are a woman and 30g of sugar a day if you are a man.
                      6. Replace ice cream with low-sugar alternatives.
                      7. Swap omega-6, partially-hydrogenated oils such as corn, palm, sunflower, safflower, cotton, canola and soybean oil for omega-3 oils such as flax, olive, and nut oils.
                      8. Replace high-sugar yoghurts with low-sugar, dairy-free yoghurts.
                      9. Swap your sugar-laden soda for sparkling water with a splash of low-sugar juice.

                      Also, ensure your diet is giving you enough of the daily essential vitamins and minerals. Most of us don’t get enough Vitamin D, Vitamin B-12, Calcium, Iron, and Magnesium. If you are low on any of the above vitamins and minerals, you may experience fatigue and low energy.

                      That’s why it’s always worth having your doctor check your levels. If you find any of them are low, then try to eat foods rich in them.

                      Alternatively, you might consider a high-quality multivitamin or specific supplement.

                      The Bottom Line

                      If you are tired of feeling tired all the time, then there is tremendous hope.

                      If you are tired because you are not getting enough high-quality sleep, then the best remedy is a bedtime routine based on sleep best practices. If you are tired because you have stress and fatigue, then the best remedy are four simple lifestyle changes discussed above.

                      Overall, adopting a healthier lifestyle is the ideal remedy for feeling more rested and energized.

                      More Tips to Stop Feeling Tired All the Time

                      Featured photo credit: Cris Saur via unsplash.com

                      Reference

                      [1] YouGov: Two-fifths of Americans are tired most of the week
                      [2] National Safety Council: Is Your Company Confronting Workplace Fatigue?
                      [3] The New York Times: Why Are We So Freaking Tired?
                      [4] Mayo Clinic: Chronic fatigue syndrome
                      [5] Very Well Health: Differences Between Sleepiness and Fatigue
                      [6] Advanced Sleep Medicine Services: NEW Guidelines: How much sleep do you need?
                      [7] Mayo Clinic: Lack of sleep: Can it make you sick?
                      [8] Ask Dr. Sears: The L.E.A.N. Lifestyle
                      [9] National Institute on Aging: Sleep loss encourages spread of toxic Alzheimer’s protein
                      [10] American Psychological Association: Getting a Good Night’s Sleep
                      [11] Yoga International: Learning to Exhale: 2-to-1 Breathing

                      Read Next