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9 Things You Need To Stop Doing After College

9 Things You Need To Stop Doing After College

Your life after college is going to be a lot different from before and making the transition can be difficult for those of us that have grown used to certain habits. There are a few things that you need to get used to doing after college and a few things that you need to get used to not doing.

1. Stop procrastinating.

In college, it was no big deal to stay up until two am and get that paper done or spend Sunday night cramming for that exam on Monday morning. But I’m afraid in the real world the procrastination just doesn’t fly. Your boss is going to know if you spent two hours on a report that should have taken ten hours. And after college you have to juggle many more responsibilities. If you’re procrastinating, those are going to feel like a stampede.

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2. Stop hanging out with people who are going nowhere.

Your life after college is 95% based on the people that you surround yourself with. If you’re spending all weekend drinking around a keg of stale beer at your buddy’s house then you might want to change your game plan up a little bit. It’s not tough to meet people after college who are looking to do big things, they might not be in your tiny hometown, but there are dreamers out there. You’ve just got to find them.

3. Stop making excuses…like for anything.

Making excuses is a dangerous habit to fall in to because when you start rationalizing your mistakes in one aspect of your life, then you’re going to start doing it throughout your day. The best way to cut down on the routine is to just kill it all together. Don’t make sorry excuses to your spouse, family or your boss. Hell, don’t make excuses to your dog either.

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4. Stop going rogue.

It’s time to put that calendar app on your iPhone to use. After college you’re going to have to juggle a lot of stuff so you better get organized. Soon, you’ve got to worry about health insurance, taxes (and how to write them off), and something called a 401k.

5. Stop eating like a fast-food junkie.

I spent my entire life in great shape, I had the six-pack of a Spartan and then suddenly I graduated and the abs turned to flab. I was still working out constantly but I realized I had to cut down on the meatball subs and Starbucks Lattes. Your metabolism slows to a crawl after college so eat all the fries you can now.

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6. Stop drinking like a fish.

Okay, it’s Cinco de Mayo, after you turn twenty-two that’s really not a good enough reason to buy a sombrero and get blasted on Jose Cuervo at the shifty dive bar two neighborhoods over. Who do you think you are, Johnny Manziel? The hangovers after college feel like somebody is beating you with a tire iron, and suddenly drinking can be a dangerous habit. The National Institute of Health stated in a report that nearly half of all college students binge drink. After graduation I’m afraid you’re going to have to abandon the Natural Light marathons.

7. Stop being discontent.

In school I was always telling myself “things are going to be so great” and “I’m going to meet a beautiful woman and surf every day and write the next great American novel”. I wasn’t exactly happy in the situation I was in. After college you still have to be hungry, looking for new jobs but you also need to realize that you don’t live in North Korea and your life is just fine the way it’s going right now. Everything you need to happen, will happen.

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8. Stop buying more and more stuff.

I’m not a big gadgets guy but I love clothes and shoes. It’s nearly impossible for me to walk past the Thomas Pink store without stopping in for a shirt. After you graduate you’re going to have to ease up on your spending. Your iPhone 5 works just fine and it’s okay if you only have two surfboards. Track your spending like a mafia boss and be thrifty.

9. Stop acting like a fool on social media.

Your social media accounts are huge after you graduate. All that time that you thought you were just screwing around on Instagram and Facebook could come back to haunt you if there are pictures of you doing kegstands. I can’t tell you how many friends I have who’ve gotten in hot water over their online life. And half of the time I apply for a job they want to know what my Twitter handle is.

Essentially, you can sum it up by figuring that after college you’re going to have to get your act together. There’s still fun to be had but you have to do a lot more juggling of responsibilities and you need to get better at it.

Featured photo credit: Picjumbo via picjumbo.com

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Last Updated on January 21, 2020

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

Creating a vision for your life might seem like a frivolous, fantastical waste of time, but it’s not: creating a compelling vision of the life you want is actually one of the most effective strategies for achieving the life of your dreams. Perhaps the best way to look at the concept of a life vision is as a compass to help guide you to take the best actions and make the right choices that help propel you toward your best life.

your vision of where or who you want to be is the greatest asset you have

    Why You Need a Vision

    Experts and life success stories support the idea that with a vision in mind, you are more likely to succeed far beyond what you could otherwise achieve without a clear vision. Think of crafting your life vision as mapping a path to your personal and professional dreams. Life satisfaction and personal happiness are within reach. The harsh reality is that if you don’t develop your own vision, you’ll allow other people and circumstances to direct the course of your life.

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    How to Create Your Life Vision

    Don’t expect a clear and well-defined vision overnight—envisioning your life and determining the course you will follow requires time, and reflection. You need to cultivate vision and perspective, and you also need to apply logic and planning for the practical application of your vision. Your best vision blossoms from your dreams, hopes, and aspirations. It will resonate with your values and ideals, and will generate energy and enthusiasm to help strengthen your commitment to explore the possibilities of your life.

    What Do You Want?

    The question sounds deceptively simple, but it’s often the most difficult to answer. Allowing yourself to explore your deepest desires can be very frightening. You may also not think you have the time to consider something as fanciful as what you want out of life, but it’s important to remind yourself that a life of fulfillment does not usually happen by chance, but by design.

    It’s helpful to ask some thought-provoking questions to help you discover the possibilities of what you want out of life. Consider every aspect of your life, personal and professional, tangible and intangible. Contemplate all the important areas, family and friends, career and success, health and quality of life, spiritual connection and personal growth, and don’t forget about fun and enjoyment.

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    Some tips to guide you:

    • Remember to ask why you want certain things
    • Think about what you want, not on what you don’t want.
    • Give yourself permission to dream.
    • Be creative. Consider ideas that you never thought possible.
    • Focus on your wishes, not what others expect of you.

    Some questions to start your exploration:

    • What really matters to you in life? Not what should matter, what does matter.
    • What would you like to have more of in your life?
    • Set aside money for a moment; what do you want in your career?
    • What are your secret passions and dreams?
    • What would bring more joy and happiness into your life?
    • What do you want your relationships to be like?
    • What qualities would you like to develop?
    • What are your values? What issues do you care about?
    • What are your talents? What’s special about you?
    • What would you most like to accomplish?
    • What would legacy would you like to leave behind?

    It may be helpful to write your thoughts down in a journal or creative vision board if you’re the creative type. Add your own questions, and ask others what they want out of life. Relax and make this exercise fun. You may want to set your answers aside for a while and come back to them later to see if any have changed or if you have anything to add.

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    What Would Your Best Life Look Like?

    Describe your ideal life in detail. Allow yourself to dream and imagine, and create a vivid picture. If you can’t visualize a picture, focus on how your best life would feel. If you find it difficult to envision your life 20 or 30 years from now, start with five years—even a few years into the future will give you a place to start. What you see may surprise you. Set aside preconceived notions. This is your chance to dream and fantasize.

    A few prompts to get you started:

    • What will you have accomplished already?
    • How will you feel about yourself?
    • What kind of people are in your life? How do you feel about them?
    • What does your ideal day look like?
    • Where are you? Where do you live? Think specifics, what city, state, or country, type of community, house or an apartment, style and atmosphere.
    • What would you be doing?
    • Are you with another person, a group of people, or are you by yourself?
    • How are you dressed?
    • What’s your state of mind? Happy or sad? Contented or frustrated?
    • What does your physical body look like? How do you feel about that?
    • Does your best life make you smile and make your heart sing? If it doesn’t, dig deeper, dream bigger.

    It’s important to focus on the result, or at least a way-point in your life. Don’t think about the process for getting there yet—that’s the next stepGive yourself permission to revisit this vision every day, even if only for a few minutes. Keep your vision alive and in the front of your mind.

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    Plan Backwards

    It may sound counter-intuitive to plan backwards rather than forwards, but when you’re planning your life from the end result, it’s often more useful to consider the last step and work your way back to the first. This is actually a valuable and practical strategy for making your vision a reality.

    • What’s the last thing that would’ve had to happen to achieve your best life?
    • What’s the most important choice you would’ve had to make?
    • What would you have needed to learn along the way?
    • What important actions would you have had to take?
    • What beliefs would you have needed to change?
    • What habits or behaviors would you have had to cultivate?
    • What type of support would you have had to enlist?
    • How long will it have taken you to realize your best life?
    • What steps or milestones would you have needed to reach along the way?

    Now it’s time to think about your first step, and the next step after that. Ponder the gap between where you are now and where you want to be in the future. It may seem impossible, but it’s quite achievable if you take it step-by-step.

    It’s important to revisit this vision from time to time. Don’t be surprised if your answers to the questions, your technicolor vision, and the resulting plans change. That can actually be a very good thing; as you change in unforeseeable ways, the best life you envision will change as well. For now, it’s important to use the process, create your vision, and take the first step towards making that vision a reality.

    Featured photo credit: Matt Noble via unsplash.com

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