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2 Things to Avoid if You Want to Live Longer

2 Things to Avoid if You Want to Live Longer

The first and most reliable choice for guidance when making changes to your lifestyle is that from your primary care physician (PCP). Establishing a solid relationship with your doctor has been proven to improve both quality of life and lifespan. However, according to the Centers for Disease Control, nearly 17% of Americans have had zero contact with a healthcare professional in the past twelve months. If you learn nothing else from this guide, understand that consulting your doctor prior to following the advice listed below is highly advised. If it’s been more than twelve months since your last check-up, call your PCP and schedule an appointment. You’ll have peace of mind knowing that your medical needs are being addressed, and you can always double-check the information you read online. As I’ll point out below, the information you receive from friends and strangers on the internet can be less than reliable. Let’s go ahead and start dispelling some of the pervasive rumors.

1. Vaping is Dangerous

There’s a growing number of people in the US and abroad that feel e-cigarettes are as dangerous as traditional tobacco cigarettes. I have a few friends in the industry so my views may be biased based on my personal experiences, but I’ll share what one of my friends shared told me at a party last week. My friend, Dan Merchant and his business partner, Vlad Vassilieve are the managing directors of Vape Club. Dan pointed out to me that, “With Public Health England stating that vaping is at least 95% safer than smoking and an endorsement from the Royal College of Physicians, it is clear that the scientific community is able to see the enormous harm-reduction benefits for smokers who switch to vaping. It is a crying shame that the political powers are not so astute- particularly with tobacco harm reduction being one of the most problematic areas of public health for decades. As a result, the industry is now faced with disproportionate regulations dreamed up in Brussels with illegitimate help from big Pharma and big tobacco.” This is clearly a statement made by someone in the industry, but let’s look at some of the studies performed by organizations on both sides of the issue. In the United States, the government has launched an entire website dedicated to discouraging e-cigarette use. One of the major points that everyone seems to agree upon is that e-cigarettes should not be sold or used by minors. Adults, however, should be able to make their own informed decisions. It appears the UK-based studies are ahead of the US in regards to smoking cessation, or the attempt to eventually quit smoking by switching from tobacco cigarettes to e-cigarettes. As Dan points out, the UK’s health agency, Public Health England, states on their website, “An expert review of the latest evidence concludes that e-cigarettes are around 95% safer than smoked tobacco and they can help smokers to quit.” In the US the government has published an interesting counter-claim. “Any e-cig brand could go through the clinical trials to become an FDA-approved cessation device, but so far none of them have announced that they’ve submitted an application to do so.” If this is true, which appears to be the case based on the FDA’s current publication on cessation methods, then there are questions that linger in regards to why e-cig companies in the US haven’t attempted to validate their claims with the government. Is vaping bad for you? Is it worse for you than smoking tobacco cigarettes? I think the studies overseas and the comments from some industry insiders point to it being a healthier alternative to traditional tobacco cigarettes. It’s my hope that the e-cig industry in the US begins to validate some of their claims with the government so that the smoke clears a bit here at home.

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2. Vitamin Supplements and Energy Pills Are Regulated

I think this will come as a shock to the people shopping in the vitamin and supplement aisle at their local drug store. All of the claims and assertions made on the packaging of the vitamin supplements and energy pills available for purchase are largely unverified. There may be private testing that points to the benefits of a specific product, but the entire supplement industry is unregulated in the U.S. The first time I learned about this I was stunned. I grew up taking a multivitamin. I always assumed the claims made on the label were verified truths. I’m not saying that everything we’re reading on the sides of bottles is a lie, but I know I’d feel a lot better if the FDA actually verified the claims made. The American Council on Science and Health points out that the $30 billion supplement industry in the US became completely unregulated as a result of the Dietary Supplement Health and Educational Act of 1994. This means that they are not regulated in the same way as prescription drugs or food. The FDA actually outlines what parts of the industry they do monitor and regulate on the Dietary Supplements page of their website. The part that sticks out the most for me is the section where the FDA states, “Firms are responsible for evaluating the safety and labeling of their products before marketing to ensure that they meet all the requirements of DSHEA and FDA regulations.” My interpretation of this statement is that firms are responsible for regulating themselves. If I’m understanding this correctly, it means that the main mechanism for enforcement of nutritional standards and public health is the use of lawsuits and legal claims against faulty manufacturers.

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From vaping to supplements and energy pills, there are a lot of misconceptions floating around. Some are based on intentional misinformation and others are based on a lack of government action. The good news is that your PCP can help guide you in the right direction about many things floating around on the web. Talk to your doctor and find out about the supplements you’re taking, and if the efforts you’re making to quit smoking are right for you.

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Featured photo credit: conysturm via flickr.com

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Ahmed Raza

CEO of Samurais.co

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Published on June 7, 2019

10 Lower Body Workouts Anyone Can Try at Home

10 Lower Body Workouts Anyone Can Try at Home

Having a hard time going to the gym? Fear no more!

In this article, we’ll be breaking down 10 in home lower body workouts anyone can try at home and their exercises. No gear needed for these workouts, just some space and a cup water waiting for your disposal.

There’re 3 main parts in this article:

If you’re familiar with the basic lower body exercises, just get into the first section 10 Lower Body Workouts That Can Be Done Anywhere right away.

If you want more guidance on the basics, check out the second section Lower Body Exercises Breakdown.

And the last section is about what you should do before and after working out.

10 Lower Body Workouts That Can Be Done Anywhere

If you’re familiar with the basic lower body exercises, just read on this section.

If you’d like to have more guidance on each exercise listed in these 10 workouts, take a look at the following part Lower Body Exercises Breakdown.

1. The Starter Workout

3 sets of 8-12 reps of:

  • Squat
  • Single Leg Deadlift
  • Glute Bridge

(30 sec to 2 min rest in between each set)

2. The 7 Minute Workout

3 rounds of 30 seconds of each exercise:

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  • Walking Lunges
  • Quarter Squat
  • Step Up
  • Single Leg Deadlift

(1 min rest in between each round)

3. The Unilateral Workout

4 sets of 16 reps of:

  • Reverse Lunges
  • Single Leg Deadlift
  • Skater Squat
  • Single Leg Glute Bridge

(30 sec to 1 min rest in between each set)

4. The Endurance Workout

2 sets of 20-50 reps of:

  • Squat
  • Walking Lunge
  • Single Leg Deadlift
  • Glute Bridge

(1-2 min rest in between each set)

5. The Back To Back Lower Body Workout

5 rounds of 10 to 20 seconds of each exercise:

  • Skater Squat
  • Step Up
  • Single Leg Deadlift
  • Single Leg Glute Bridge
  • Quarter Squat

(30 min rest in between each round)

6. Strength Lower Body Workout

5 to 10 sets of 4 reps of:

  • Walking Lunge
  • Single Leg Deadlift
  • Squat

(30 sec to 2 mins of rest time in between set)

7. Glute Burner Workout

4 sets of 10-30 reps of:

  • Walking Lunge
  • Single Leg Deadlift
  • Single Leg Glute Bridge
  • Quarter Squat

(1 min of rest time in between set)

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8. The Advance Lower Body Workout

3 rounds of 20 seconds of:

  • Squat
  • Walking Lunge
  • Skater Squat
  • Reverse Lunge
  • Glute Bridge
  • Single Leg Deadlift

(2 mins of rest time in between set)

9. The Quick Lower Body Workout

2 sets of 10 reps of:

  • Reverse Lunge
  • Step Up
  • Single Leg Deadlift

10. The 100 Repetition Challenge

2 sets of 50 reps on each leg of:

  • Walking Lunge
  • Single Leg Deadlift

(4 mins of rest time in between set)

Lower Body Exercises Breakdown

Here’s the breakdown of the lower body exercises[1] that you found in the workouts listed in the first section of this article.

1. Squat

    A squat is a compound movement which entails the recruitment of a majority of your lower body (quadriceps, hamstrings, gluteal muscles, spinal erectors).

    How to squat:

    Feet shoulder width apart or a little wider. Toes pointed slightly out, arms out in front of you. Sit into your heels till you hit parallel with your butt and knee, drive through the heels, return to starting position and repeat.

    2. Walking Lunges

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      A lunge is a complex movement which recruits mainly the lower body.

      The walking lunges are a harder version of a split squat which is stationary and then adds the component of stepping and keeping balance which engages the gluteus medius as well as allowing a larger range of motion.

      3. Reverse Lunge

        A reverse lunge is very similar to the split squat but instead, after every rep, you are returning to the starting position and stepping back.

        By reverse stepping, you are allowing for a better emphasis on the hamstrings and gluteal muscles as opposed to the quadriceps muscles in a forward stepping lunge.

        4. Quarter Squat

          A quarter squat is the top ¼ movement of a squat. This will work mainly the gluteal muscles as it emphasizes the hip extension and not a lot of range of motion on the quadriceps muscles.

          5. Skater Squat

            A skater squat is a unilateral variation of the squat, this squat really engages the gluteus medius and hamstrings as it works unilateral stability and hip flexion which fires both the hamstrings and glutes.

            6. Step Up

              The Step Up is the greatest balance of getting the glutes and quadriceps muscles firing. Doing Step Ups will not only get the glutes going, but the quadriceps as well.

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              7. Glute Bridge

                Glute Bridges are a great way to nearly isolate the glutes and build a great butt. This entire movement works through hip extension which the main movement of the gluteal muscles.

                8. Single Leg Glute Bridge

                  Single leg glute bridge ensures that we are evenly building the glutes and not relying too heavily on our dominant leg and symmetrical butt. The step up can be done in a chair or a step in the stairs

                  9. Single Leg Deadlift

                    Single Leg RDL’s engage that entire booty and hamstrings, especially the gluteus medius due to its unilateral stability property. This is a great way to spice up some routine deadlifts.

                    Before & After Working Out

                    Before engaging in any physical activity, consult a doctor if you have not worked out in years. However, if you want to go at it without consulting a doctor, start slow and build your way up. Even though it’s home workout, use dynamic stretching or some light jogging[2] as a warm up before starting the lower body workouts.

                    Finally, at the end of the lower body workout, use static stretching to reduce injuries and to calm down your heart rate gradually.

                    Featured photo credit: Gesina Kunkel via unsplash.com

                    Reference

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