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Why Women Suffer From Insomnia More Often Than Men (And Ways To Help!)

Why Women Suffer From Insomnia More Often Than Men (And Ways To Help!)

Men lose weight faster and easier than women, they don’t ever have to experience pregnancy hormones, the pain of childbirth or the craziness of menopause, and they need less sleep than women do. As if these statements aren’t enough, scientists also know that women are far more likely to suffer from insomnia than men.

In fact, when it comes to sleep disorders and disturbances, women beat men in every category except one – sleep apnea. At least we don’t have to sleep with a loud machine strapped to us, but at this point, there are a lot of women out there who would gladly put up with a sleep apnea machine if it meant they could sleep!

So why are women not sleeping? There can be many causes of insomnia, and some are specific to women. Here are some of the main causes of insomnia in women and what you can do to combat them and get some shut-eye:

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Hormones Are One of the Causes of Insomnia in Women

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    Your monthly cycle, perimenopause and menopause can all cause sleep disturbances and leave you tossing and turning. Not to mention the night sweats! Sometimes the hormones that show up during your period can make you feel more emotional or sensitive than usual and this can keep you awake at night as well.

    What to do: Talk to your doctor about your options for treatment during menopause. It could be a long time before sleep stops evading you and for some, it lasts for many years. If it’s period symptoms that keep you from sleeping well, try taking ibuprofen before bed, sleeping with a fan or applying a hot water bottle if you’re experiencing cramps.

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    Being A Light Sleeper Doesn’t Help Insomnia

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      There’s nothing worse than being woken up in the night and not being able to get back to sleep. Women know this feeling more than anyone because they are typically lighter sleepers than men. Whether its the kids, the dog, the snoring husband or the sounds of traffic outside, women tend to wake up to anything. This does not help when battling insomnia.

      What to do: Unless you have small children, try wearing ear plug at night to block out sounds. If you can’t stand sleeping with ear plugs, you can also try putting a loud fan on or turning on a white noise machine. These types of sounds usually help people to focus in on them instead of other sounds (like your partner’s snoring) and will help you to sleep. If you have reallu good hearing, you may want to get the loudest fan you can find!

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      Pregnancy Can Cause Insomnia

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        The closer you get into your pregnancy, the harder it is to fall asleep and stay asleep. It’s almost like your body is preparing you for the first few months of your baby’s life when sleep will be but a distant memory! Pregant women are tired and need sleep though, and not being able to get comfortable at night is very frustrating. (Especially when you can’t drink a pot of coffee in the morning.)

        What to do: The more pregnant you become, the harder it will be, but you can still try! Get another pillow or two so you can put one under your belly and behind your back for added support if you need it. If you have room, you can also try investing in a larger bed, because you will be grateful for the extra space as the baby continues to grow. You may also benefit from a fan at night when hot flashes start kicking in. These tips may or may not continue to work as you grow, so if you ever have the opporunity to nap, always, always take it, because you never know what the next night will bring with it!

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        Your Lifestyle May be the Culprit

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          “A woman’s job is never done.” This cliche is all too true for so many women. Between your, kids, work, spouse and home, the day always seems to end with a list of things you haven’t been able to get to. While men seem to be able to forget about a to-do list, and drift off easily at night, women have a much harder time going to sleep with things left undone. When you are this busy, it is extra hard for your brain to relax at night and allow sleep to take over. When you lay your head on your pillow at night, your mind should not be going a hundred miles an hour!

          What to do: Keep bedtime sacred and start winding down for the night at least an hour before you’d like to be asleep. If there are things on your mind, write them down before you get in bed. This signals your brain that it will be taken care of and it might actually let you sleep for a change!

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          Last Updated on December 2, 2018

          7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

          7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

          When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

          You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

          1. Connecting them with each other

          Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

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          It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

          2. Connect with their emotions

          Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

          For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

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          3. Keep going back to the beginning

          Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

          On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

          4. Link to your audience’s motivation

          After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

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          Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

          5. Entertain them

          While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

          Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

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          6. Appeal to loyalty

          Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

          In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

          7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

          Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

          Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

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